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#31    Grey14

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 06:43 PM

My favorite character that I played was a paladin that had horrible luck. I mean I would roll incrediably bad at times when I needed it to count. Such as one time when he was trying to save some peasants from an orge/goblin  cave he rolled so bad on a roll that he fell through a rotten floor into what served as a flushing channel for the waste water of the cave (ie outhouse) and got flushed out of the cave and into a small river along with the rest of his party. Needless to say the peasants didnt make it and my character took it to heart as a failure on his part. And there were lots of situations he ran it that had outcomes like that, kind of like he almost would get to the end and save the day but invaraibly something stops him and he falls short. So it added to his character since in his eyes any failure to protect the weak reflected on him. Now on the flipside there were several times when the situation was so dire(twice in this characters life) he was able to call to his diety and his rolls were so perfect that his diety would intervine and aid him. So in all though he was flawed he was also blessed and it was fun to play him. Even had a good name if i say so myself. Elsaheed Sabban Sadot Rushdin.

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#32    Taun

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 07:27 PM

One of the things I like best about our game is that there are no Classes...

You are just people (of whatever type)...  Classes (we feel) are too restrictive... In real life I can learn just about anything I want, so why would I want to limit my fantasy to a select few skill sets?...

If I want my character to be a sword weilding priest who knows a lot of mage type spells - so be it...

Plus we have open ended skills...


#33    Insanity

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:02 AM

One reason I like Battlelords is that there are no classes, and no levels.  There are a lot of skills, and your character is defined by what skill he/she has.  Some races are better at some skills then others, and there are few restrictions.  Experience points earned go to skill points, which are used to increase skills.  A character is usually described in terms of how many experience points they've earned vs. class levels.

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#34    DieChecker

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:09 AM

I do like class-less games, but it sometimes makes it uneven if some Players make their Characters much better then the others. This happens all the time in various super hero games where it is all based on points and managing your points.

We one time worked up characters in Hero System, I think, that were to represent our own selves. It is interesting how some people think they are super intellegent and other thing they are super diplomatic and both are wrong. I got mondo skills because I had finished my Bachelor Degree and also been 4 years in the Army, while other Players had only done Sales since they were 20.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#35    DieChecker

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:10 AM

I do like the way the old *** (Chtulu) let your skills increase the more you used them. If you did well on a skill roll, your ability in that skill advanced.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

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#36    Insanity

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:16 AM

Yep, in Cthulhu I've had a few players get a few skills as starting characters in the 80s, knowing that when they get them above 90, they get some Sanity points back right away.

One thing I've never really cared about with D&D is the spell slots, and having to memorized such spells as "Indentify" just on the off chance the need may arise for it.  I did like in 4E were many of the 'non-combat' spells were made into rituals, and a wizard always had some spell or magic at his disposal, rather then using the last prepared spell slot and then switching to a light crossbow or staff.

Edited by Insanity, 04 October 2012 - 03:16 AM.

"We see things only as we are constructed to see them, and can gain no idea of their absolute nature. With five feeble senses we pretend to comprehend the boundlessly complex cosmos, yet other beings with wider, stronger, or different range of senses might not only see very differently the things we see, but might see and study whole worlds of matter, energy, and life which lie close at hand yet can never be detected with the senses we have." - H.P. Lovecraft, "From Beyond" Published 1934

#37    Taun

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 12:46 PM

In our game we have defined General Skills (like Mathematics, Bladed Weapons, Scavenging...etc)... we have no defined specific skills....

A player opens a General Skill - lets say "Scavenging" - it's Success Chance is based on the characters Governing Attribute and Talent (All General Skills have one of each) and modified by the Skills Difficulty Factor (DF)... We call these "Blue SKills" becasue on the Character Sheet (An Excel Spreadsheet) the Skills are in a Blue colored cell...

The "Blue Skill" also has a factor called "Blocks"... Scavenging happens to have 30 blocks... To open a subskill (specific skill ) under Scavenging (say - "Technical" - scavenging for usefull bits of scrap technology) you would have to study and/or practice the skill for enough time (successful die roles - or study period) to reduce the 30 "Blocks" to 0 then you open the Sub skill to rank 1 (10 is MAX) - you remove various numbers of blocks by way of various levels of success...

Since there are no clearly defined Specialty Skills - the Players create their own and the Success Chances are derived from the Blue Skill.... (with GM approval of course)... A person has no "Level" but is defined by their skill level in specific (or general) knowledge...

Raising a Skill is through practice/study or use... We have 3 levels of Success...  Regular Success (RS) - which earns the specific skill 1d20 Learning Points (LPs), Critical Success (CS) which earns 1 Experience Point (XP) and Heroic Success (HS) which earns 2 XPs... There are also 3 levels of Failure: RF (1d10 LPs because you can learn from failure) CF and HF which bring dire consequences...

When a skill has 100 LP's they are converted to 1 XP... When the skill has 1 more XP than it's level the skill level goes up and all XP's LPs are erased...

Magic/Psionics works more or less the same way except you only increase through Success (no LP's for RF)...  Also there are no "Blue Spells"... All spells are created by the Player Characters (though they are then added to the Spell List and incorporated into the game)... Subject to GM approval and modification of course...

It really involves the players not only in story telling but in Game Design - and allows for some very interesting and fun tailoring of the Characters...


#38    Taun

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 01:01 PM

Here is an excerpt from a character's skill sheet:

Posted Image
Everything is rolled for on d100 and yes you can have a Success Chance higher than 100 - remember it is modifed by the Difficulty Factor (DF) - the first Blue Number after the Blue SKill Name each DF subtracts 5 from the Success Chance to a minimum of 5...

The Red number on the Right end of the Blue line is the Block Number for each subskill... Under that number is where you would keep track of Blocks remaining - or if you know the Skill, LPs...
The XPs are kept track of in the Left hand column...  The first block with an abbreviated word in it is the Governing Talent (natural ability of the Character - gained at birth), the next name is the Players Governing Attribute for that Skill...

Skill Level is the third number from the right and the second from the right is the Success Chance...

We put this on a spreadsheet so we don't have to constantly calculate formulae...

Edited by Taun, 04 October 2012 - 01:05 PM.


#39    DieChecker

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:55 PM

Looks pretty cool Taun. I played in a sci-fi game with my friends that one of them home-brewed that had skills much like that. But how we improved the skill was by logging time in training. So if you wanted to go from 3 to 4, it might take 80 hours of study, and then 200 hours to go from 4 to 5. But... the amount of time varied according to how specific the skill was. Having a skill at Super Mario Brothers would be a lot quicker to learn then a general Video Games skill. Thus most of us ended up with a few general skills and lots of specific skills that were developed over the game time.

Starship Maintenance might take 500 hours to go from 2 to 3, and Starship Engine Maintenance might take only 200 hours from 2 to 3, but Starship Engine (Mark V Venture Industries) would only take 20 hours to go from 2 to 3. And then usually there was bleed over depending on how specific the skill was, so having a level 6 in that one starship engine would give you a 4 in all starship engines, and maybe a 3 in overall maintenance. But the time to get to level 6 on that one engine would be more then what was needed for level 4 general engines, so there was no loophole that way.

The thing was that usually we also had Projects that we were working on at the same time, like improving the said Venture Industries engine, or working on the data for a new hyperspace route, or in direct adventuring, so you had to plan your Down Time with some care, so that your projects got done, but your skills also improved. (Since we were the Heros of the story, the story kept constantly moving toward bigger bosses and more dangerous activities, not increasing skills was a sure way to fail.)

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#40    Night Walker

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 09:57 PM

I played some D&D in high school but in order to turn individual games into lengthy campaigns I had to run the game myself. Afterwards I did the same for Call of Cthulu (which is just such a cool genre) and Vampire: The Masquerade. However, running games and campaigns takes a LOT of preparation time and work.

To get the role-playing experience (ie to become absorbed with your character) I joined a LARP (live action role playing) group based on Vampire: The Masquerade which is more about Machavellian supernatural politics in which the characters are monsters struggling to hold on to their own humanity. My character was a crazy prankster vampire and I suspect that I was able to get away with much mischieve simply because I was good fun to have around. I found that I had most enjoyment playing the character when I cut loose, focused solely on the character's story, and lived in the moment rather than worried about what I should do in order to stay alive. It was a character that lasted until the End of the World (ie when international story arc came to an end).

I haven't done any RPGs or LARPs for a while but would love to explore Changeling: The Lost or Deadlands (love the steampunk genre and Doomtown is my favourite CCG). Has anyone played these?

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#41    Insanity

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 11:30 PM

One of my favorite characters was a gnome rogue.  When we started playing it was AD&D 2E, and eventually we converted over to 3rd when it came out.

In short, the gnome was a b******.  More a cat burglar, most notably, he had murdered a family of elves once when a job went bad.  Then the crime was framed onto another gnome by the guild he belonged too.

Additionally, our group was on some quest, I think to find pieces of a broken rod.  An evil wizard wanted it, and somehow I was kidnapped by him, and after some torturous nights in his tower, I was given a choice of spying on the group for him, or death.  I chose to spy.

"We see things only as we are constructed to see them, and can gain no idea of their absolute nature. With five feeble senses we pretend to comprehend the boundlessly complex cosmos, yet other beings with wider, stronger, or different range of senses might not only see very differently the things we see, but might see and study whole worlds of matter, energy, and life which lie close at hand yet can never be detected with the senses we have." - H.P. Lovecraft, "From Beyond" Published 1934

#42    MissMelsWell

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:40 AM

How geeky is this? I have one group of friends who have essentially been playing the same D&D game for ... 33 years.

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#43    Taun

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:34 AM

View PostMissMelsWell, on 05 October 2012 - 04:40 AM, said:

How geeky is this? I have one group of friends who have essentially been playing the same D&D game for ... 33 years.

We tend to retire our characters after a few years... Usually they become too powerful after a while... or too beat up...


#44    Insanity

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 12:55 PM

View PostMissMelsWell, on 05 October 2012 - 04:40 AM, said:

How geeky is this? I have one group of friends who have essentially been playing the same D&D game for ... 33 years.

That gnome was part of a game that lasted for about 13 years.

"We see things only as we are constructed to see them, and can gain no idea of their absolute nature. With five feeble senses we pretend to comprehend the boundlessly complex cosmos, yet other beings with wider, stronger, or different range of senses might not only see very differently the things we see, but might see and study whole worlds of matter, energy, and life which lie close at hand yet can never be detected with the senses we have." - H.P. Lovecraft, "From Beyond" Published 1934

#45    DieChecker

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 11:39 PM

View PostMissMelsWell, on 05 October 2012 - 04:40 AM, said:

How geeky is this? I have one group of friends who have essentially been playing the same D&D game for ... 33 years.
That is Absolutely Fantastic. I love these games that keep good friends together forever.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker




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