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Palo Mayombe: The Religion of the Spirits


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#46    Beany

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 03:51 PM

Thanks for info, eFelix. All of my experience with Ifa is with a couple of houses in California; I wasn't aware of the differences in practices or philosophies, and I have none with Palo. Ifa, like most spiritual traditions, has it's own set of rules & rituals, and is sometimes as dogmatic as other traditions. I would guess that practices vary from house to house, and region to region, and from lineage to lineage. My experiences with most spiritual traditions is that there are a lot of similarities of beliefs, but sometimes the differences instead of the commonalities become a focus. IMHO, there are many ways to live a sacred life. What I like about Ifa are the joyous celebrations, the dogma not so much.


#47    xFelix

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 04:10 PM

View PostBeany, on 19 May 2013 - 03:51 PM, said:

Thanks for info, eFelix. All of my experience with Ifa is with a couple of houses in California; I wasn't aware of the differences in practices or philosophies, and I have none with Palo. Ifa, like most spiritual traditions, has it's own set of rules & rituals, and is sometimes as dogmatic as other traditions. I would guess that practices vary from house to house, and region to region, and from lineage to lineage. My experiences with most spiritual traditions is that there are a lot of similarities of beliefs, but sometimes the differences instead of the commonalities become a focus. IMHO, there are many ways to live a sacred life. What I like about Ifa are the joyous celebrations, the dogma not so much.

The issue isn't with the traditional priesthood of ifa, the houses, the lineages, or even regions... The issue is that too many people are initiated into ifa and then become consumed with themselves thinking that they are Orunmila themselves. They can do and say as they please, and nobody can say a word.

My posts consist of my opinions, beliefs, and experiences, feel free to disagree in a respectful manner.

I have a right to my beleifs, just as you have a right to not agree with them.

So long as we respect each other's beliefs, we won't have a single problem.





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