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Drunken teen eaten by stray dogs


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39 replies to this topic

#31    aztek

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 10:25 PM

View Postredhen, on 06 March 2013 - 09:41 PM, said:

Thus you see out of control diabetes, obesity, alcoholism and drug addiction. There simply are no jobs in many reserves and I can fully understand the frustration of the youth.
change reservations, to trailer parks, or projects, and your statment is still true.

RESIDENT TROLL.

#32    redhen

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 12:59 AM

View Postaztek, on 06 March 2013 - 10:25 PM, said:

change reservations, to trailer parks, or projects, and your statment is still true.

Very similar symptoms and causes. The Indians have land based rights though, which puts them into another category all together. Many federal and provincial laws either do not exist on Indian reserves, or they are just not enforced.  I think the American reserves are also similar. The media for the most part doesn't want to touch these stories. Pity.


#33    Ashotep

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 01:22 AM

I feel sorry for the young man that died.  Alcohol can do terrible things to you if you drink too much.

I know you can buy stuff on the Reservations here tax free.


#34    Goddess_Lilith

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 05:30 AM

Maybe he died from alcohol poisoning. The article said he'd been drinking for 24hrs, that might be a bit too much... I think there's a few more problems than the dogs going on there.


#35    Frank Merton

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 06:57 AM

Marginal cultures always have social problems -- alcoholism, unstable marriages, abandoned or abused children, radical politics and religious movements, apathy.  They don't want to join the majority culture and the majority culture has discriminatory prejudices that keep them apart anyway.  They have few if any economic opportunities and so are poor.  They are stuck.  Often they just die out.

Its a policy dilemma.  You want to overcome the majority culture's discrimination and get a money flow into their hands.  The casinos in the US are a try at that, probably causing as many problems as they solve.  Turning them into a tourist attraction is common -- my how cute the costumes and handicrafts and special dances that they never do except for tourists anyway.  Let's buy something to add to our collection of stuff.

Then comes the problem of their use of land that can be better be used other ways.  Vietnam has that problem in spades when it comes to coffee plantations.  The local tribes want to stay with their traditional agricultures, the national planners see foreign exchange from growing coffee in large plantations with professional (non-local) managers.  Which to do -- that which is best for the nation or that which is best for a small and vanishing local culture?

Finally, how hard do you push or discourage assimilation?  The majority culture is biased and sees them as primitive and even barbaric, and most in it think the only solution is assimilation -- forced if necessary -- hence special schools and taking children away from families.  That this is outrageous is realized generally too late.  Besides, the loss of these cultures is a loss to the nation in all sorts of artistic and cultural and historical ways.  Still, discouraging assimilation seems wrong too.  Why should those who want to join the majority culture not be helped by anti-discrimination laws?  Why should they be forced to stay in a trap?


#36    pallidin

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:05 AM

Look, the dogs only wanted to have a little tequila with their meal.  :w00t:




Edited by pallidin, 07 March 2013 - 08:11 AM.


#37    redhen

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 02:43 PM

View PostFrank Merton, on 07 March 2013 - 06:57 AM, said:

Finally, how hard do you push or discourage assimilation?  The majority culture is biased and sees them as primitive and even barbaric, and most in it think the only solution is assimilation -- forced if necessary -- hence special schools and taking children away from families.  

There are more Indian children in foster homes now than there ever was during the height of the residential schools program.

Quote

That this is outrageous is realized generally too late.  Besides, the loss of these cultures is a loss to the nation in all sorts of artistic and cultural and historical ways.

There are plenty of resources that promote indigenous language and culture. They are in no danger of going extinct. Like I said before, Indians are the fastest growing segment of the Canadian population.

Quote

Still, discouraging assimilation seems wrong too.  Why should those who want to join the majority culture not be helped by anti-discrimination laws?  Why should they be forced to stay in a trap?

There are also plenty of resources (that are not available to non-Indians) like free tuition and living allowances to promote post secondary education. Many Indians take advantage of these programs to gain higher education (I did), but many more drop out after a few weeks or months.

Money is not the solution. Besides huge sums of money dispersed directly from the federal government and casino revenue, many Indian bands receive substantial amounts from oil and gas leases. I suspect that these wealthy bands have the very same social problems.


#38    Frank Merton

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 02:54 PM

Well of course it is beyond question that throwing money at a problem will not solve it.

From what you say, I get the feeling the problems are mostly cultural -- tribes that are ethnically adapted to one kind of life are trying to live another, and that alongside a dominant culture that is substantially different.

You need some good luck.


#39    Thanato

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 03:54 PM

View Postredhen, on 07 March 2013 - 02:43 PM, said:

Money is not the solution. Besides huge sums of money dispersed directly from the federal government and casino revenue, many Indian bands receive substantial amounts from oil and gas leases. I suspect that these wealthy bands have the very same social problems.

I agree, look at the most famous of these situations, Attawapiskat (sp?). They receive 10s of millions a year from De Beers and look at the situation there, the band gets paid tons while the people live in squallier.

I believe the entire reservation system is obsolete.

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#40    Crashley

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 11:32 PM

I spent a week on a Blackfoot reservation years ago. It broke my heart. The dogs were very smart there, they would sneak up and grab your lunch off the work site. I certainly do not generalize them all, but there, some of those people were very cruel to their dogs. Noone takes care of them, they abandon them, and leave them to die. I thought they respected animals? Im quite sure no U.S. govt will deal with them. No animal control, county or city police intervene, they have their own laws and judicial system. Allthough sometimes they will step in to handle homicides, but animal abuse and neglect doesnt appear to be an issue for them.

Edited by Crashley, 13 March 2013 - 11:35 PM.





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