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The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


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#9931    Oniomancer

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:15 PM

View Postzoser, on 21 March 2013 - 05:50 PM, said:

You amaze me Mr O:

Andesite is the most common volcanic rock after basalt. It is porphyritic, that is, consists of coarsecrystals (phenocrysts) embedded in a granular or glassy matrix (groundmass). Having a silica content of 57%, it is in the intermediate category (526% silica) of the silicicafic scale.

http://www.enotes.co...erence/andesite

This is why even though I have respect for you I don't really believe what you say without checking up.

Want to retract your statement?

All quartz is silica but all silica is not quartz. Silicates include a wide variety of minerals besides quartz. From wiki: The mineral assemblage is typically dominated by plagioclase plus pyroxene and/or hornblende. Magnetite, zircon, apatite, ilmenite, biotite, and garnet are common accessory minerals.[1] Alkali feldspar may be present in minor amounts. The quartz-feldspar abundances in andesite and other volcanic rocks are illustrated in QAPF diagrams.

Not even enough quartz to rate mentioning. But let's check that QAPF diagram: http://en.wikipedia....canic_field.gif

Note where andesite sits on the Q scale.

But wait, what's this? "embedded in a granular or glassy matrix." What's that bolded word there?

Edited by Oniomancer, 21 March 2013 - 06:20 PM.

"Apparently the Lemurians drank Schlitz." - Intrepid "Real People" reporter on finding a mysterious artifact in the depths of Mount Shasta.

#9932    Oniomancer

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:19 PM

View Postzoser, on 21 March 2013 - 05:54 PM, said:

The precision work in quartz bearing stone is the biggest single enigmatic feature of ancient cultures in Peru, Egypt and Bolivia.  It can be seen on a smaller scale in Turkey as well.

This fact is highly significant, and modern archaeology simply fails to explain it, preferring instead to brush it under the carpet.

They could have used softer stone and made their lives considerably easier.  Quartz bearing rock was obviously highly significant to them.

Again, quartz content in some of these rocks is highly questionable. I'll wager these rocks have quite a few characteristics in common. You're picking one out of a hat that isn't even significant in the way you claim.

"Apparently the Lemurians drank Schlitz." - Intrepid "Real People" reporter on finding a mysterious artifact in the depths of Mount Shasta.

#9933    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:34 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 21 March 2013 - 06:15 PM, said:

All quartz is silica but all silica is not quartz. Silicates include a wide variety of minerals besides quartz. From wiki: The mineral assemblage is typically dominated by plagioclase plus pyroxene and/or hornblende. Magnetite, zircon, apatite, ilmenite, biotite, and garnet are common accessory minerals.[1] Alkali feldspar may be present in minor amounts. The quartz-feldspar abundances in andesite and other volcanic rocks are illustrated in QAPF diagrams.

Not even enough quartz to rate mentioning. But let's check that QAPF diagram: http://en.wikipedia....canic_field.gif

Note where andesite sits on the Q scale.

But wait, what's this? "embedded in a granular or glassy matrix." What's that bolded word there?

I think you are trying too hard Mr O.  This is simply not going to work.

All sources point to the same conclusion:

intermediate igneous rocks containing between 52 - 63% SiO2 (example andesite and dacite)

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Igneous_rock

Posted Image


#9934    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:44 PM

An intriguing photograph showing evidence of stone moulding.  These anomalies can be found all over the rock outcrops in Peru.  The walls at Cuzco and Sacsayhuaman also bear unexplainable moulding marks.

Posted Image

Edited by zoser, 21 March 2013 - 06:45 PM.

Posted Image


#9935    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:48 PM

Here is an excellent video containing scores of images of precision stonework, moulding and vitrification.

The only problem is that the stills tend to come and go a little quickly.

Get ready on the pause button!



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#9936    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:51 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 21 March 2013 - 06:19 PM, said:

Again, quartz content in some of these rocks is highly questionable. I'll wager these rocks have quite a few characteristics in common. You're picking one out of a hat that isn't even significant in the way you claim.

The significant feature is that they are both highly rich in crystals.  Exactly what purpose those crystals played in the function of the walls has still to be discovered.

That remains the key to the mystery.

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#9937    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:12 PM

An interesting reflection apparently from Protzen himself:

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http://books.google....ftening&f=false

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#9938    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:46 PM

Moulding not chiselling or pounding:

Posted Image

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#9939    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:02 PM

Maybe the answer lies here:

This needs looking into but Hutchinson demonstrates:

1) Anti-gravity technology.
2) Electrical energy from stone (shades of the Great Pyramid?)



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#9940    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:07 PM

An iron bar is softened and distorted:



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#9941    zoser

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:31 PM

Hutchinson discusses the effects of the technology.

If this energy were directed it could explain the stone anomalies; precision and moulding.



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#9942    Oniomancer

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 09:07 PM

View Postzoser, on 21 March 2013 - 06:34 PM, said:

I think you are trying too hard Mr O.  This is simply not going to work.

All sources point to the same conclusion:

intermediate igneous rocks containing between 52 - 63% SiO2 (example andesite and dacite)

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Igneous_rock

No, you're not trying hard enough.:

"The lack of quartz, and so no mineral which has a hardness of over 5.5, makes it possible to distinguish andesite..."
- Field Book of Common Rocks and Minerals, Frederic B. Loomis

" Contains little quartz but is rich in ferromagnesian minerals..."
- Rocks and Minerals, Joel Abram

SiO2 is just plain silicon dioxide. Plain old silica. All but 3 of the component minerals listed by wiki are silicates, meaning they contain silica. None are peizoelectric. All rocks contain crystals, except obsidian.

Since when did Protzen start referring to himself in the third person like Scruffy from Futurama?

The so-called  hutchinson effect isn't anywhere near as impressive as the Copperfield Effect:



So, to recap, No significant quartz, so no peizoelectricity, which doesn't work that way in the first place, so no power plant, so no advanced machinery.
Plus all that other AA stuff which is nonexistent or wrong, so no theory and no argument.



"Apparently the Lemurians drank Schlitz." - Intrepid "Real People" reporter on finding a mysterious artifact in the depths of Mount Shasta.

#9943    seeder

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 10:58 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 21 March 2013 - 09:07 PM, said:



The so-called  hutchinson effect isn't anywhere near as impressive as the Copperfield Effect:


David Copperfield?  See some REAL MAGIC and levitation...  with no strings







.

Edited by seeder, 21 March 2013 - 10:59 PM.

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#9944    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 09:15 AM

we're watching a doco on Britain, and they're talking about "beerstone" (spelling??) and how if worked in the underground qusrry it's realtively soft and great for fine detail work, but exposed to the air it hardens to something so hsrd it's used for cathedeals andvthe Rimans loved it forvit's durability.

is it possible the "softened" rock is similar, and what we're seeing is the now hardened and exposed rock from old mines (ie once they were underground, but are now exposed and have hardened) there's some evidence to support this with the tunnels Zoser's enamoured with showing signs of being excavated

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#9945    Norbert the Incredible

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 09:25 AM

Ah, that'll be stone from here. --> http://en.wikipedia....er_Quarry_Caves


But there's no incredible Precision I'm afraid. :(

Edited by Lord Vetinari, 22 March 2013 - 09:29 AM.

Life is a hideous business, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous.

H. P. Lovecraft.


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