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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#4906    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:29 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 09:42 AM, said:


What you are trying to prove is that 'engine' is another word for 'washing machine' because well, a washing machine does have an engine, right? Like a wall has a gate, ergo, wall=gate.

And the only reason you start about it is because the Latin name for the Phoenician Gadir sounds like gate, and of course because you need a gate in your Atlantis theory...

Right, so Hades and his gates are not outside the Straits of Hercules...?


I don't NEED anything.

Did you notice I started a topic yesterday that now I already don't think is correct? If I was pushing stuff do you think that is the actions of someone who would do that?

Hardly.

A lost passage of Pindar quoted by Strabo was the earliest traceable reference in this context: "the pillars which Pindar calls the 'gates of Gades' when he asserts that they are the farthermost limits reached by Heracles."
http://www.answers.c...ars-of-hercules

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 10:30 AM.

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#4907    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:32 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 10:29 AM, said:

Right, so Hades and his gates are not outside the Straits of Hercules...?


I don't NEED anything.

Did you notice I started a topic yesterday that now I already don't think is correct? If I was pushing stuff do you think that is the actions of someone who would do that?

Hardly.

A lost passage of Pindar quoted by Strabo was the earliest traceable reference in this context: "the pillars which Pindar calls the 'gates of Gades' when he asserts that they are the farthermost limits reached by Heracles."
http://www.answers.c...ars-of-hercules


OK, now show us the connection with the OLB, aside from the city being mentioned in the OLB.


#4908    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:38 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 10:25 AM, said:

The important thing is that you seem to skip past the fact that the original name for Gades was Gadir.

And - well, I think - you started to talk about Gades/Cadiz because the city is supposed to show up in the OLB as Kadik.

All the rest would fit into one of your Atlantis threads a lot better.
I know, but I started one yesterday and it wouldn't fit into that one...maybe I'll just wait a day or so to start a new one... :ph34r:

I started the Gades thing here because I realised that Gades was gate and then it just flowed from there with Hades all through Baetea to Baiae at Rome with the exact same thing, it's the Underworld of Hades.

Aeneus even visits his father at this one in Rome at Baiae, that's how he communicates with him. This place was shut down c. 1st century AD when they felled the trees in the groves and blocked the tunnels to prevent any further underworld experiences.

The new one by National Geographic is a beauty, even on NBC this one, I'm watching intently as they uncover the mud flats near Gades - the gates of Gades that is.

----------

It's like delta and the hanging tent door that is really a way out, to liberate, which goes into A.DEL.A - the liberator of the people through the book as I said before. Well Kadik sounds like something to do with DIKE, so I'm pretty sure the same meaning is being made, I'll look into it.

It really has nothing to do with Atlantis except it also makes perfect sense.

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 10:47 AM.

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#4909    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:44 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 10:32 AM, said:

OK, now show us the connection with the OLB, aside from the city being mentioned in the OLB.
I'm getting to it, don't rush me...

Point behind it all, the Phoenicians of Tyre were speaking a language like the Frisians.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#4910    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:46 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 10:38 AM, said:

I know, but I started one yesterday and it wouldn't fit into that one...maybe I'll just wait a day or so to start a new one... :ph34r:

I started it because I realised that Gades was gate and then it just flowed from there with Hades all through Baetea to Baiae at Rome with the exact same thing, it's the Underworld of Hades.

Aeneus even visits his father at this one in Rome at Baiae, that's how he communicates with him. This place was shut down c. 1st century AD when they felled the trees in the groves and blocked the tunnels to prevent any further underworld experiences.

The new one by National Geographic is a beauty, even on NBC this one, I'm watching intently as they uncover the mud flats near Gades - the gates of Gades that is.

----------

It's like delta and the hanging tent door that is really a way out, to liberate, which goes into A.DEL.A - the liberator of the people through the book as I said before. Well Kadik sounds like something to do with DIKE, so I'm pretty sure the same meaning is being made, I'll look into it.

It really has nothing to do with Atlantis except it also makes perfect sense.

ADEL would translate as "Nobility".

Yep, and KADIK would be something like (in Dutch) KADE-(or Kaai, En: quay)DIJK (dike).

Btw, even if you start a thread about some topic, and then realize you had it wrong, then you correct yourself, say you made an error, and try again.... in the same thread.

Seems the thing to do, right? At least we have it all tucked together in one thread.


#4911    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:53 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 10:46 AM, said:

ADEL would translate as "Nobility".

Yep, and KADIK would be something like (in Dutch) KADE-(or Kaai, En: quay)DIJK (dike).

Btw, even if you start a thread about some topic, and then realize you had it wrong, then you correct yourself, say you made an error, and try again.... in the same thread.

Seems the thing to do, right? At least we have it all tucked together in one thread.
Yes, I added this yesterday when my mind started to slowly change again...

--Tartessos always sounded a good candidate, so why does Thera seem to convey what Plato speaks of also but it's not in the right spot?

Now I'm hoping the thread will just die.

I have added to the National Geographic thread on Atlantis though and added my thoughts to it today since it seemed the best one to add to regarding the area of Gades.

And no, ADEL actually means GOD IS NOBLE, which of course, like Aryan the meaning to noble, is free. God is Free is what ADEL means. The same thing. A message of his freedom.

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 10:54 AM.

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#4912    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:01 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 10:53 AM, said:

Yes, I added this yesterday when my mind started to slowly change again...

--Tartessos always sounded a good candidate, so why does Thera seem to convey what Plato speaks of also but it's not in the right spot?

Now I'm hoping the thread will just die.

I have added to the National Geographic thread on Atlantis though and added my thoughts to it today since it seemed the best one to add to regarding the area of Gades.

And no, ADEL actually means GOD IS NOBLE, which of course, like Aryan the meaning to noble, is free. God is Free is what ADEL means. The same thing. A message of his freedom.

Maybe I am missing something here, lol. You start another thread, you think you had it wrong, and now you use this already HUGE thread to tell us you were wrong in that other thread.

:blink:

==

ADEL means NOBILITY (noun) or NOBLE (adjective). There is no 'god' involved.


#4913    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:06 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 11:01 AM, said:

Maybe I am missing something here, lol. You start another thread, you think you had it wrong, and now you use this already HUGE thread to tell us you were wrong in that other thread.

:blink:

==

ADEL means NOBILITY (noun) or NOBLE (adjective). There is no 'god' involved.
I posted what I put int he other thread, it seemed you made some suggestion I should and I was telling you I already had. You missed it, yeah.

Adel \a-del\ as a boy's name (also used as girl's name Adel), is of Hebrew and Old German origin, and the meaning of Adel is "God is eternal; noble". More familiar as a part of other names.
http://www.thinkbaby.../meaning/1/Adel

It doesn't even matter if God is in the name or not really in the end, I was being picky - the meaning is NOBLE - FREE - It's the SAME WORD as DEL in delta. To free, to liberate. Or if you want Nobility - the free ones.

Hebrew and Old German, why doesn't that suprise me..?

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#4914    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:11 AM

The Sanskrit word ka is water.

ka dike - it's pretty obvious there it means - water gate.

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#4915    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:14 AM

or quay is also that, a water gate area for boats. The walled stronghold is probably the actual quay they built - the water gate (water dike) area. That is the Gadir, that is the Kadik.

Maybe the Phoenicians didn't even name it but called it that because it was already called that because as far as I'm concerned, the words are the same - Kadik is water dike, which is a quay, which is a water gate, which is what Gadir is named after, the walled stronghold (that ships entered through the gate), Gades.

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 11:18 AM.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#4916    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:20 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 11:06 AM, said:

I posted what I put int he other thread, it seemed you made some suggestion I should and I was telling you I already had. You missed it, yeah.

Adel \a-del\ as a boy's name (also used as girl's name Adel), is of Hebrew and Old German origin, and the meaning of Adel is "God is eternal; noble". More familiar as a part of other names.
http://www.thinkbaby.../meaning/1/Adel

It doesn't even matter if God is in the name or not really in the end, I was being picky - the meaning is NOBLE - FREE - It's the SAME WORD as DEL in delta. To free, to liberate. Or if you want Nobility - the free ones.

Hebrew and Old German, why doesn't that suprise me..?

Adel is "God is eternal; noble". So, NOT "God is noble".

The first meaning, "God is eternal" is the meaning of the Jewish name. "Noble" is the meaning of the German name.
Every 'baby-name' site copied the same line from the other, but apparently no one understands the line tells us that ADEL means two things, one in the Jewish language, the other in the German language.

That the name ADEL shows up in 2 different languages doesn't necessarily mean one came from the other.

It's like saying "JACK" comes from "Yitzak".

But no doubt Jews who have lived in English speaking countries may have changed their first name, Yitzak, into Jack.

Noble=Free ?? It has more to do with being respectable, royal or ruler, 'blue blood' as they say.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 16 May 2011 - 11:23 AM.


#4917    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:26 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 11:20 AM, said:

Adel is "God is eternal; noble". So, NOT "God is noble".

The first meaning, "God is eternal" is the meaning of the Jewish name. "Noble" is the meaning of the German name.
Every 'baby-name' site copied the same line from the other, but apparently no one understands the line tells us that ADEL means two things, one in the Jewish language, the other in the German language.

That the name ADEL shows up in 2 different languages doesn't necessarily mean one came from the other.

It's like saying "JACK" comes from "Yitzak".

But no doubt Jews who have lived in English speaking countries may have changed their first name, Yitzak, into Jack.

Noble=Free ?? It has more to do with being respectable, royal or ruler, 'blue blood' as they say.

.

Abe, it does not say that at all about one being Hebrew and one being German. They are one and the same in case you are missing it.

Surely you didn't miss all my noble, love about Priam...? Which I think is the name from the word here I bolded Sanskrit Priyah.

O.E. freo "free, exempt from, not in bondage," also "noble; joyful," from P.Gmc. *frijaz (cf. O.Fris. fri, O.S., O.H.G. vri, Ger. frei, Du. vrij, Goth. freis "free"), from PIE *prijos "dear, beloved," from base *pri- "to love" (cf. Skt. priyah "own, dear, beloved," priyate "loves;" O.C.S. prijati "to help," prijatelji "friend;" Welsh rhydd "free"). The adverb is from O.E. freon, freogan "to free, love."

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
Flagpole Sitta - Harvey Danger

#4918    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:37 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 11:26 AM, said:

Abe, it does not say that at all about one being Hebrew and one being German. They are one and the same in case you are missing it.

Surely you didn't miss all my noble, love about Priam...? Which I think is the name from the word here I bolded Sanskrit Priyah.

O.E. freo "free, exempt from, not in bondage," also "noble; joyful," from P.Gmc. *frijaz (cf. O.Fris. fri, O.S., O.H.G. vri, Ger. frei, Du. vrij, Goth. freis "free"), from PIE *prijos "dear, beloved," from base *pri- "to love" (cf. Skt. priyah "own, dear, beloved," priyate "loves;" O.C.S. prijati "to help," prijatelji "friend;" Welsh rhydd "free"). The adverb is from O.E. freon, freogan "to free, love."

Just think: in what way can one word mean "noble" and "joyfull". Noble has nothing to do with being joyfull.

Maybe the OE (= Old English) thought so, but from your quote I see it was only them.

I'll give you a modern example from Dutch.

We have a word, "wreed", and it used to only mean "cruel". But nowadays young people use the word when the mean "cool".

During the Dutch hippie days they often used the word "gaaf" (with that gutteral sound in the beginning you all live so much, lol), meaning: wow, cool. But it's original meaning (and still used) is "smooth", or "complete" or "without faults".

And I am not missing anything about your quote about ADEL. It's you - and many others - who are missing something.


#4919    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:42 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 11:37 AM, said:

Just think: in what way can one word mean "noble" and "joyfull". Noble has nothing to do with being joyfull.

Maybe the OE (= Old English) thought so, but from your quote I see it was only them.

I'll give you a modern example from Dutch.

We have a word, "wreed", and it used to only mean "cruel". But nowadays young people use the word when the mean "cool".

During the Dutch hippie days they often used the word "gaaf" (with that gutteral sound in the beginning you all live so much, lol), meaning: wow, cool. But it's original meaning (and still used) is "smooth", or "complete" or "without faults".

And I am not missing anything about your quote about ADEL. It's you - and many others - who are missing something.
joy
early 13c., "feeling of pleasure and delight," from O.Fr. joie, from L. gaudia, pl. of gaudium "joy," from gaudere "rejoice," from PIE base *gau- (cf. Gk. gaio "I rejoice," M.Ir. guaire "noble"). Joy-riding is Amer.Eng., 1908.

http://www.etymonlin...ex.php?term=joy

I think when the slaves were freed, from Babylon, say, they rejoiced quite a bit.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
Flagpole Sitta - Harvey Danger

#4920    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 11:54 AM

The word noble as in to know has no connection - what has connection in the form of noble is:

Nobility, a hereditary caste
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noble

Noble may be to know, as in famous, but nobility is always about class and distinction of caste as Wiki tells us above. Free or a slave. Slaves were not nobility.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
Flagpole Sitta - Harvey Danger