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[Merged] Gobekli Tepe


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#271    docyabut2

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:23 AM

Posted Image

Gremlin if you looked at the baskets there are animals going into them.

Edited by docyabut2, 07 October 2012 - 01:25 AM.


#272    The Gremlin

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:26 AM

View Postdocyabut2, on 07 October 2012 - 01:23 AM, said:

Posted Image

Gremlin if you looked at the baskets there are animals going into them.

versatile baskets, can keep your chicken fresh too.....they would only be completely closed/stitched along the left side (using the pic above) the top and right would be open, perhaps sealable with a catch or tie.

Im trying to find a vid that demonstrates what i mean.

modern berry pickers are a more specialised (less versatile) version of what i mean....
Posted Image

Imagine one of these crossed with a thick leather game-bag.
Im sure ive seen Australian aborigines using them, amongst others.

Edited by The Gremlin, 07 October 2012 - 01:53 AM.

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#273    docyabut2

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:51 AM

There are three sets of hands on the statue, one of the bird god, the hands of the mother who is giving birth and the last is of the baby`s.




Posted Image

Edited by docyabut2, 07 October 2012 - 02:00 AM.


#274    docyabut2

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:01 AM

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#275    Harte

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 04:19 AM

View Postlightly, on 06 October 2012 - 11:16 PM, said:

I don't know ..  i wish i knew what  both scenes represent. What do you say, or think?
Read this here.

Quote

...it seems clear that the bucket and cone were associated with purification, for they are known respectively as banduddu (bucket) and, significantly, mullilu (purifier)...
From "Gods, Demons and Spirits of Ancient Mesopotamia," by Jeremy Black and Anthony Green.

Those two fellows are very well known in certain (small) circles.

The passage linked above refers to the Assyrian use of the symbol.  I believe the figure in the link provided by Ove is Assyrian.  All their figures look squat and muscled up.

The same iconography, however, appears in Babylonian and Sumerian works.  I've read that in those cases, it is thought that the Apkallus holding the cone and bucket are actually providing fertility.   You sometimes see these Apkallu (who later turned into what we now call genies in Islam and angels in Judeo-Christian, but started out as the "seven Sages" of Sumerian myth - sent here by Anu to teach us) anointing a human figure, invariably a king.  In those, it's interpreted as the Apkallus backing up the king's claim that it is he that provides the fertility, through agents of Isis, or Ishtar, (IIRC) to the crops in the fields.

Harte

Posted Image
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#276    lightly

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:29 PM

Thank you Harte.      i think yourself, and  kmt_sesh,  have offered me explanations of the depicted scenes before...  And i have read the ideas elsewhere.. that the "cone"  represents either a fir or pine cone  OR  male flowers of the Date Palm.
      It says in your linked book that the buckets contain water OR pollen. (depending on the stylized tree?)
So,  it's either a scene of Purification.. or possibly, fertilization ?..   depending on the culture depicting it.

  I've wondered if the scene may have started out more simply,  as an act of collecting (something),   but got more grandiose through repetition...  as many ideas tend to do.
  I just thought it would sound silly if i tried to explain or expound on it with my limited understanding.   .. and it does :)


*

Edited by lightly, 07 October 2012 - 12:33 PM.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#277    Ove

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:37 PM

View Postlightly, on 06 October 2012 - 11:16 PM, said:

I don't know ..  i wish i knew what  both scenes represent. What do you say, or think?

... i just noticed the  V  on the neck of the bird on the column ,above,  that the puzzler posted.

Wikpedia : "The Assyrian Tree of Life was represented by a series of nodes and criss-crossing lines. It was apparently an important religious symbol, often attended to by eagle-headed gods and priests, or the King. Assyrilogists have not reached consensus as to the meaning of this symbol. It is multi-valent. The name "Tree of Life" has been attributed to it by modern scholarship; it is not used in the Assyrian sources. In fact, no textual evidence pertaining to the symbol is known to exist."

I have no idea what Men with feathers (bird men) do ? The basket, the pine cone, the bush or tree,  I have no idea ?

Her you have the V-neck on a Gobekli Tepe statue



Posted Image

Edited by Ove, 07 October 2012 - 12:44 PM.


#278    lightly

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:41 PM

but started out as the "seven Sages" of Sumerian myth - sent here by Anu to teach us) anointing a human figure, invariably a king.  

Harte



blessings.jpg


Ok, someone take us  back to Gobekli tepe......  

* Ah,  Ove already did .    I remember you showing images of priestly V neck vestments in the
past..... reminiscent of wings .

Edited by lightly, 07 October 2012 - 01:00 PM.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#279    Ove

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:48 PM

View PostEarl.Of.Trumps, on 06 October 2012 - 11:41 PM, said:


this one here - I get the impression it is a pregnant woman with her hands around her belly-bulge. great art.
http://www.google.co...r:15,s:15,i:173

http://www.unexplain...howtopic=235334

Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Ove, 07 October 2012 - 12:51 PM.


#280    Abramelin

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:57 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 07 October 2012 - 01:51 AM, said:

There are three sets of hands on the statue, one of the bird god, the hands of the mother who is giving birth and the last is of the baby`s.




Posted Image

And the baby is a bit large for a baby, and it looks like it's holding a pot or something.


#281    Abramelin

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:00 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 07 October 2012 - 12:33 AM, said:

The temples of Gobekli Tepe no where resemble the steps, latters or mountain tops of the Tibetan sky-burials

Who said they should? It's about the idea of sky burials.

And how old are these Tibetan constructions anyway?


#282    docyabut2

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:16 PM

This article says,

Hauptmann's site also features a unique floor relief of a squatting woman--perhaps giving birth--


http://www.ancient-w...rkeygobekli.htm

Any one have any pictures of the floor reliefs.


#283    docyabut2

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:50 PM

I would say the temples were brithing centers, but for what reasons still can`nt figure out:)


#284    Abramelin

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:06 PM

View Postdocyabut2, on 07 October 2012 - 01:16 PM, said:

This article says,

Hauptmann's site also features a unique floor relief of a squatting woman--perhaps giving birth--


http://www.ancient-w...rkeygobekli.htm

Any one have any pictures of the floor reliefs.


The World's First Sheela-na-gig at the World's Oldest Temple

by LYDIA RUYLE

The motif of a female is found only in a drawing carved into a stone slab on the floor of the Löwenpfeilergebäude. The naked woman is depicted in a sitting position with straddled legs, obviously representing a sexual scene (Fig. 35) Schmidt sees similarities to figures known as “dejenoun” in the rock art of North Africa.”
--p. 80, Neolithic in Turkey:The Cradle of Civilization: New Discoveries, edited by Mehmet Ozdogan/Nezih Basgelen, 1999.

In 2006, I created a Goddess Icon Banner of the image and named her Göbekli Tepe. She has been flying around the world ever since. My banner description states:

Göbekli Tepe is a Neolithic Sheela-na-gig incised into stone on the floor of a rock cut temple which appeared to have ritual purposes.Two standing pillars with lions sculpted in relief protect one of the earliest known Sheelas. Göbekli Tepe, which means navel mountain, is in eastern Turkey near the source of the Euphrates River. Emmer wheat was domesticated in the area. All life comes from and returns to the mother.
Source: Incised rock. 9600 BCE. Göbekli Tepe. Near present day Urfa, Turkey


http://medusacoils.b...-at-worlds.html

Here she is:

GT_sheela.jpg

And this is Sheela-na-gig:

https://www.google.n...7D6a_0QXOtICwBw

.

Edited by Abramelin, 07 October 2012 - 02:12 PM.


#285    Macroramphosis

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 02:39 PM

It's interesting to wonder whether we jump to conclusions, sometimes. If, for example, we had discovered these pillars in north America, we would be calling them stone totem poles, most likely devoid of religious significance, but instead depicting a vertical pictogram of tribal or cultural history, and most likely used and associated with rituals and ceremonies. And the vultures would probably be interpreted in the same way as eagles atop "real" wooden totem poles are. It also seems the culture in Anatolia at this time were just as keen as carving out all the different animals around them as the Native Indians were.

However, assuming that the site was used for religious purposes, I'm wondering whether the pillars supported a wooden pillar for the laying out of bodies - a pillar that could have been removed (and the wood used for other purposes) when the site was buried ? I'd put money on the reason for the burial, as against destruction of the site, was simple too - the culture was moving on, spiritually and religiously, but out of respect for the "old", they refrained from destruction and interred the site as a form of preservation. I suspect therefore that even after "burial", the site maintained a great deal of significance for many years and continued to be visited by generations of people. I'd very much doubt 100% of the population involved at the time would instantly forget such an important site.

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