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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#3256    Abramelin

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 12:00 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 29 March 2013 - 11:11 AM, said:

Interesting too.

So, is W a separate letter? Maybe not. Maybe it's just showing the double ligature version of it's use, VV as what appears as W in the letter list - which might not actually be a W - as well as regular V as V. The same letter no-id-ea mentioned. The W that is on the manuscript pages could be from sheer laziness to lift your ink pen, unneeding to dip again. Being a lazyish person, I'd do that, not take my pen off while joining 2 V's. It's just a running writing/cursive step without being officially cursive.

I showed you how "Wralda" was written around the Yule wheel: -W- is one of the 6 letters making up the name Wralda:

Posted Image



And -W- does not appear in the letter list, like the letter for -NG- .


.

Edited by Abramelin, 29 March 2013 - 12:05 PM.


#3257    Apol

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 12:36 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 29 March 2013 - 11:10 AM, said:

They may have not been interested in their own history that much, but they sure must have felt the need to copy all those laws and regulations?

So someone living in a burgt like Münster, Buda, Kattenburch and so on would at least copy those laws and regulations, and others after him or her.

They did surely copy the texts from the burghs, but probably on some paper or the like.
It would have vanished anyway.


#3258    Abramelin

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 12:39 PM

View PostApol, on 29 March 2013 - 12:36 PM, said:

They did surely copy the texts from the burghs, but probably on some paper or the like.
It would have vanished anyway.

Copied and copied and copied.

You can't expect to use the same book of laws for centuries.


#3259    Apol

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 12:58 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 29 March 2013 - 12:00 PM, said:


And -W- does not appear in the letter list, like the letter for -NG- .
.

That's true. In fact, I hadn't noticed it.
That's a strong indication that the W is a double V. They made it a W because then they didn't have to lift the pen between the V's, which meet up right and left anyway.

Edited by Apol, 29 March 2013 - 12:59 PM.


#3260    Abramelin

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:08 PM

View PostApol, on 29 March 2013 - 12:58 PM, said:

That's true. In fact, I hadn't noticed it.
That's a strong indication that the W is a double V. They made it a W because then they didn't have to lift the pen between the V's, which meet up right and left anyway.


Posted Image
Here they had all the time in the world to lift their pen, but didn't because they considered the -W- to be a unique, separate letter:

.

Edited by Abramelin, 29 March 2013 - 01:14 PM.


#3261    The Puzzler

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 29 March 2013 - 01:08 PM, said:

Posted Image
Here they all the time in the world to lift their pen, but didn't because they considered the -W- to be an unique, separate letter:
So where is it in the letter list? ... as you said and I said, it's not or at least it doesn't look like that, so it could be a double V.

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#3262    The Puzzler

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 01:44 PM

I wonder if instead of touching the bottom of her garment/tunic they touched the back of her neck. hnecca in English is quite like tohnekka, without the t sound

From Middle English nekke, nakke, from Old English hnecca, *hnæcca (“neck, nape”), from Proto-Germanic *hnakkô (“nape, neck”), from Proto-Indo-European *knog-, *kneg- (“back of the head, nape, neck”). Cognate with Scots nek ("neck"), North Frisian neek, neeke, Nak ("neck"), Saterland Frisian Näcke ("neck"), West Frisian nekke ("neck"), Dutch nek ("neck"), Low German Nakke ("neck"), German Nacken ("nape of the neck"), Danish nakke ("neck"), Swedish nacke ("neck"), Icelandic hnakki ("neck"), Tocharian A kñuk ("neck, nape"). Possibly a mutated variant of *kneug/k (cf. Old English hnocc 'hook, penis', Welsh cnwch 'joint, knob', Latvian knaūķis 'dwarf', Ancient Greek knychóō 'to draw together'). More at nook.
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/neck

Edit: I see it's the slyp of her tohnekka so maybe neck is not good, maybe slyp has a meaning I'm unaware of, yet.

What is it to hem? Like slip, undergarment type womens slip? So, not really a hem, more her slip.

This seems to make it sure seem like tunic. It's not made of linen anyway.

Hira hemeth is linnen, hira tohnekka wol, thaet hjv selva spon aend wêvade.[OLB]
Haar hemd is linnen, haar tunica wol, dat zij zelve spon en weefde.[Dutch]
Her shirt/skirt is of linnen, her tunic (?) is of wool, that she herself spun and wove.[English/me]
Her garments of linen and wool she spun and wove herself.[Sandbach

Edited by The Puzzler, 29 March 2013 - 01:59 PM.

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#3263    The Puzzler

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 02:22 PM

Saxon dress mentions this: A linen undertunic (worn under the outer woollen tunic)

Her undertunic is possibly what they touched - her slip type tunic, probably the linen one under her woollen one.

Still tunic though I know, just defining that part above.

What's interesting though, is the word in Latin is a possible borrowing from Etruscan.  http://en.wiktionary...ki/tunica#Latin

I always defend the possibility too that while in Near Krekaland/Italy their language was with them and their is no reason they did not impart certain words into Etruscan or Latin at that time.

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#3264    NO-ID-EA

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:25 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 29 March 2013 - 11:11 AM, said:

Interesting too.

So, is W a separate letter? Maybe not. Maybe it's just showing the double ligature version of it's use, VV as what appears as W in the letter list - which might not actually be a W - as well as regular V as V. The same letter no-id-ea mentioned. The W that is on the manuscript pages could be from sheer laziness to lift your ink pen, unneeding to dip again. Being a lazyish person, I'd do that, not take my pen off while joining 2 V's. It's just a running writing/cursive step without being officially cursive.

Thats what i am thinking Puzzler , the original run and stand script did not forget the W , they did not have it at that time , they just had V or VV , maybe the W was only updated useage in the 13th C copying of the wet wridden book .........another little thing the so-called forgers would have had to know in order to fake it


#3265    NO-ID-EA

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:32 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 29 March 2013 - 11:06 AM, said:

See bolded text: no, I don't think so.

Here is part of the original letter sheet:

(click to enlarge)

Attachment OLB_NM.jpg

And every people from around the Med and the Middle East had a separate letter for -N- and -M-  for thousands of years already.

yes you are probably right Abe, M is the pyramid shape and NN would not do it , its not the upside down u , as in nn , and i can see for the same reason W is double V rather than double U , strange they called it double U in English ,and not double V

Edited by NO-ID-EA, 29 March 2013 - 08:35 PM.


#3266    Apol

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 06:30 AM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 29 March 2013 - 08:32 PM, said:

yes you are probably right Abe, M is the pyramid shape and NN would not do it , its not the upside down u , as in nn , and i can see for the same reason W is double V rather than double U , strange they called it double U in English ,and not double V

In general, Scandinavians have problems with pronouncing the W when talking English. Most people give it the same sound as the V. Even if the W exists in the Scandinavian alphabets, it is a foreign letter to us, only used for foreign words and for some family names changed by affectation.

In fact, the OLB shows us why the letters V and W are different in pronounciation - it is two V's, and should be pronounced as that.

I wouldn't say that the W emerged from laziness. It emerged from practical and visual reasons.
Astoundingly, in the wheel (jol) the W is regarded as being one letter - even if it doesn't exist as a letter in the alphabet.

Edited by Apol, 30 March 2013 - 06:56 AM.


#3267    NO-ID-EA

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 07:24 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 29 March 2013 - 12:00 PM, said:

I showed you how "Wralda" was written around the Yule wheel: -W- is one of the 6 letters making up the name Wralda:

Posted Image



And -W- does not appear in the letter list, like the letter for -NG- .


.

Whenever you put up that image of the wheel Abe , there is a feint stroke by the letter W , is this a modern image or a copy of an old one , and if its old why was it there ?, i am presuming its just a modern error at the moment  !!


#3268    The Puzzler

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 11:53 AM

Here's Vearalden: http://en.wikipedia....ki/VÀraldarade

and Waralden...

Waralden Olmai, also known as Maylmen Olmai, Radien-attje, Jubmel or Vearalden Olmai, was a major Sami god. Sami people come from Sápmi, or modern day Finland, Sweden, and Norway. These ancient Nordic people were polytheistic and "Waralden Olmai" was their "world-god". Waralden Olmai is also an epithet for the Germanic Freyr. Today Waralden Olmai is a mythologic figure in Nordic countries.
http://en.wikipedia..../Waralden_Olmai

and here the Magi of the North...

In Lapland, the Saami shaman (called the Magi of the North) is believed to have the power to raise the wind and storms.

The Saami shaman, or noid (also spelled nojd, noyde and noajdde), was believed to have the gift of second sight, invisibility, shape-shifting, weird visions and the capability to create false apparitions. Because of this power, Martin Luther called Lapland the home of the devil. Missionaries to Lapland believed that the noid were literally possessed by demons, and the shaman's drum was a powerful "instrument and tool of the devil." The regions and peoples of the extreme North have always held a special fascination for peoples in the temperate zones. The excessive cold, the winter darkness and the reputed mystical powers of the Hyperborean people have long attracted the imagination of writers, adventurers and seekers of mystic powers. Surely, Santa Claus lives in the North because, like a holy Magi, he holds the great supernatural power of the noid.

http://www.laweekly....a-wildman/full/

Edited by The Puzzler, 30 March 2013 - 12:06 PM.

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#3269    Knul

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 12:19 PM

This is how the OLB should look like if it were a manuscript from the 13th century.

Posted Image


#3270    The Puzzler

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 12:54 PM

View PostKnul, on 30 March 2013 - 12:19 PM, said:

This is how the OLB should look like if it were a manuscript from the 13th century.

Posted Image

You truly think Hiddo would have written it like that?

OKKE MY SON—
You must preserve these books with body and soul. They contain the history of all our people, as well as of our forefathers. Last year I saved them in the flood, as well as you and your mother; but they got wet, and therefore began to perish. In order not to lose them, I copied them on foreign paper.
In case you inherit them, you must copy them likewise, and your children must do so too, so that they may never be lost.
Written at Liuwert, in the three thousand four hundred and forty-ninth year after Atland was submerged—that is, according to the Christian reckoning, the year 1256.
Hiddo, surnamed Over de Linda.—Watch

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