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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#10336    Otharus

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:35 PM

View PostVan Gorp, on 18 February 2012 - 06:16 AM, said:

Menapii -> Me-Na-By -> Mee Nabij -> onze buren die met ons zijn -> Allied Neighbours (Doornik region)
Chauci  -> Ga-Houck -> Hoekig gaan, binnenvallen -> Tsjokken (to shock, see Choques in Frans Vlaanderen) -> to be shocked

And to make the movie complete we have
Germani -> Geer-mannen -> Samenkomen (vergaren, vergaderen, guerre)
Alemani -> Hale-mannen -> Allemant is a village in Frans Vlaanderen
Gaulen  -> Ga-Halen -> We gaan het halen, wat ze ons hebben afgepakt!
Thank you VG, good to see you're busy with some older pages of the thread.

OLB provides an etymology for GERMANI and ALEMANI, I wonder if CHAUCI can be related to this fragment:

"MEN KAVCH IS ÁK WAN FRYAS ÀND MOT KÁP WÉSA" (p.146).

Gaules are called GOLA in OLB, but the meaning is not clear.
It is suggested that was the name of the sent priests from Sion. (p.60).


#10337    Otharus

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:45 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 February 2012 - 09:56 AM, said:

I cried my eyes out because I thought she would never come back...and drown at sea!! And that I can remember very clearly.
The first dream about me dying was also about drowning. I was 11, had never thought about how it would be, but it was very realistic. I was deep down, trying to reach the surface, when I ran out of air and could no longer hold my breath. When my lungs filled with kold, salt water, I sank down, and that surprised me, because I had never realised by then that that is what would actually happen.

The oldest dream (when I was 4 or 5) was really bizarre. I was a grown up man, lying in bed with princess (now queen) B.


#10338    Otharus

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:52 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 February 2012 - 10:22 AM, said:

And then there are those 2 letters, -W- and -GS- , that are left out of the Yule wheel table on page 46 of the manuscript.
Although usually written as if it is one letter, I think W was officially seen as double V. COdL also explains this in one of his diaries (things he had learnt from his father, appearantly), and in English the letter is also called double-U.

Why GS (or Gz) is missing, I don't know. Maybe the letter was 'modern' and not official.


#10339    Otharus

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 08:59 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 February 2012 - 02:25 PM, said:

I have been very busy with ancient North-Frisian legends I found a 19th century online account of. It was copied with OCR (Optical Character Reading) and thus contained a multitude of errors.

The legend (or the interpretation thereof) talks about what can only be Three Goddesses (but no names), a supreme spirit called The Old One, or "Uald", and some 'lost race'.
This surely sounds interesting, but what is said about the source of this info?


#10340    Abramelin

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 09:38 PM

View PostOtharus, on 18 February 2012 - 08:13 PM, said:

Interesting.
Fian = vijand (enemy)

Oudnederlands Woordenboek (sorry, too lazy to translate today):

fīunt
Woordsoort: znw., m.
Modern lemma: VIJAND
Oudste attestatie: 901-1000
Frequentie: totaal: 26, appellatieven: 26
Etymologie: Cognaten: Oudfries  fiānd, fiūnd.
Morfologie: ongeleed. Oorspronkelijk het tegenwoordig deelwoord van het ww. dat overeenkomt met Ohd. fīēn, Got. fijan 'haten', dat in het Ndl. niet meer bekend is.


http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...emmodern=vijand

Otharus, I have lot more to tell you all about these "Fin", but I better wait till next day, heh.

I do not want to post something that makes me look like a dork again.

Well, if you don't want to wait, Google "Paabo" AND "Boat-people" AND "Inuit", all that together in one Google search.

Swede once said the guy who created that 'Paabo' website was 'just' an artist, but I can tell you here and now: the Paabo guy (a Finn) may not be a scientist, but sure as hell he is not stupid.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 February 2012 - 10:02 PM.


#10341    Otharus

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:16 AM

View PostOtharus, on 18 February 2012 - 08:35 PM, said:

Gaules are called GOLA in OLB, but the meaning is not clear.
It is suggested that was the name of the sent priests from Sion. (p.60).
GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)

In Jewish folklore, a golem (ɡoʊləm/ goh-ləm; Hebrew: גולם‎) is an animated anthropomorphic being, created entirely from inanimate matter. The word was used to mean an amorphous, unformed material in Psalms and medieval writing.
[...]
The word golem occurs once in the Bible in Psalm 139:16, which uses the word גלמי, meaning "my unshaped form".


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golem

Posted Image


#10342    Abramelin

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:43 AM

View PostOtharus, on 19 February 2012 - 10:16 AM, said:

GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)

In Jewish folklore, a golem (ɡoʊləm/ goh-ləm; Hebrew: גולם‎) is an animated anthropomorphic being, created entirely from inanimate matter. The word was used to mean an amorphous, unformed material in Psalms and medieval writing.
[...]
The word golem occurs once in the Bible in Psalm 139:16, which uses the word גלמי, meaning "my unshaped form".


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golem

Posted Image

Gola in Hebrew refers to the Jewish diaspora

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gola


The Jewish diaspora (or simply the Diaspora) is the English term used to describe the Galut גלות (Yiddish: 'Golus'), or 'exile', of the Jews from the region of the Kingdom of Judah and Roman Iudaea and later emigration from wider Eretz Israel.

http://en.wikipedia....Jewish_diaspora


====


Calais << Kales << Caled/Calad << Caletum

Although the early history of habitation in the area is obscure, the Romans called the settlement Caletum. Julius Caesar mustered 800 to 1000 sailing boats and 5 legions and some 2000 horses at Calais due to its strategic position to attack Britannia.[1] Later, in medieval times, the settlement was inhabited by people who spoke Dutch, and who called it Kales. It is mentioned in Welsh documents as Caled, in Irish documents as Calad, and in Breton documents as Kaled. It is at the western edge of the early medieval estuary of the River Aa.

Kalta? Celts?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calais

I think this etymology is why Iman Wilkens said the Pillars of Hercules were the white cliffs of the Street of Dover. Her-Cules.

>> It is possible that the name Herne may originate from the Old English hyrne, the O.E. for 'horn' or 'corner' [13][14][15] At any rate it is clearly derived from the same Indo-European root, *ker-n-, meaning bone or horn.

http://en.wikipedia....erne_the_Hunter

"Horn/Corner of Kales"? Hern-Kales? LOL.


+++++++++++++

EDIT:

The reader of the writing was
Freso, and he the wanderers chose
to be their king, or visible Uald.
But their troubles were by no
means at an end, and they had
many adventures before passing
through the Pillars of Hercules,
which the Frisians call "dit Nau."
Then they entered the Atlantic,
which they call "the Spanish sea."


http://oeralinda.blo...le-of-sylt.html

.

Edited by Abramelin, 19 February 2012 - 11:11 AM.


#10343    Abramelin

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:56 AM

View PostOtharus, on 18 February 2012 - 08:13 PM, said:

Interesting.
Fian = vijand (enemy)

Oudnederlands Woordenboek (sorry, too lazy to translate today):

fīunt
Woordsoort: znw., m.
Modern lemma: VIJAND
Oudste attestatie: 901-1000
Frequentie: totaal: 26, appellatieven: 26
Etymologie: Cognaten: Oudfries  fiānd, fiūnd.
Morfologie: ongeleed. Oorspronkelijk het tegenwoordig deelwoord van het ww. dat overeenkomt met Ohd. fīēn, Got. fijan 'haten', dat in het Ndl. niet meer bekend is.


http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...emmodern=vijand

fiend
O.E. feond "enemy, foe," originally prp. of feogan "to hate," from P.Gmc. *fijæjan (cf. O.Fris. fiand "enemy," O.S. fiond, M.D. viant, Du. vijand "enemy," O.N. fjandi, O.H.G. fiant, Goth. fijands), from PIE base *pe(i)- "to blame, revile" (cf. Goth. faian "to blame;" see passion). As spelling suggests, it was originally the opposite of friend, but the word began to be used in O.E. for "Satan" (as the "enemy of mankind"), which shifted its sense to "diabolical person" (early 13c.). The old sense of the word devolved to foe, then to the imported word enemy.

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none


vijand zn. ‘tegenstander’ (opponent)
Onl. fīunt, fīant ‘tegenstander’ in uuanda of fiunt flukit mi ‘want als de vijand mij vervloekte’ [10e eeuw; W.Ps.], ande sint auor thine uiande ‘het zijn echter je vijanden’ [ca. 1100; Will.]; mnl. viant ‘tegenstander; (de) duivel’ in hare uiande ‘hun tegenstanders’ [1236; VMNW]; vnnl. vijand, vyand.
Het al vroeg in alle Germaanse talen zelfstandig gebruikte teg.deelw. van Proto-Germaans *fijēn- ‘haten’.(=to hate)

Os. fiand, fiond (mnd. viant); ohd. fīant (nhd. Feind); ofri. fiand, fiund (nfri. fijân < nl.); oe. fēond (ne. fiend); on. fjándi (nzw. fiende); got. fijands; alle (oorspr.) ‘tegenstander, vijand’, ook wel ‘(de) duivel’; < pgm. *fijēnd-, letterlijk ‘de hatende’, bij het werkwoord *fijēn- ‘haten’, waaruit: ohd. fīēn; oe. fēōn; on. fjá; got. fijan.

http://www.etymologi...refwoord/vijand

Well, maybe "Fian" was the name of some people who became the enemies of later invaders?


#10344    Otharus

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:19 AM

View PostOtharus, on 19 February 2012 - 10:16 AM, said:

GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)
Dutch Wiki (translated):

"Golem (Jewish legend)" was an anthropomorphic figure made of clay and animated by a rabbi [priest].
The word golem is probably derived from the Hebrew word 'gelem'(גלם), which means raw material.


Posted Image

OLB, translation Sandbach p.139:

"Among Finda's people there are false teachers, who, by their over-inventiveness, have become so wicked that they make themselves and their adherents believe that they are the best part of Wr-alda, that their spirit is the best part of Wr-alda's spirit, and that Wr-alda can only think by the help of their brains.

That every creature is a part of Wr-alda's eternal being, that they have stolen from us; but their false reasoning and ungovernable pride have brought them on the road to ruin. If their spirit was Wr-alda's spirit, then Wr-alda would be very stupid, instead of being sensible and wise; for their spirit labours to create beautiful statues, which they afterwards worship."


Edited by Otharus, 19 February 2012 - 11:21 AM.


#10345    Abramelin

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:29 AM

The word "GOLA" dates from about the 6th century BC, while "GOLEM" is from medieval times, but anyway, centuries more recent then GOLA.

You should also not forget that the Hebrews and Phoenicians spoke closely related languages, and that very often Hebrews travelled along with the Phoenicians to settle along the coasts of the Mediterranean.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 19 February 2012 - 11:31 AM.


#10346    Otharus

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:33 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 19 February 2012 - 11:29 AM, said:

The word "GOLA" dates from about the 6th century BC, while "GOLEM" is from medieval times, but anyway, centuries more recent then GOLA.
The oldest sources for the word "golem" may be from medieval times, but the folklore may have been much older.

Anyway, a relationship with "GOLA" (as used in OLB) makes sense.


#10347    Abramelin

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:38 AM

View PostOtharus, on 19 February 2012 - 11:33 AM, said:

The oldest sources for the word "golem" may be from medieval times, but the folklore may have been much older.

Anyway, a relationship with "GOLA" (as used in OLB) makes sense.

I think you make it difficult for yourself.

Tha Gola, alsa heton tha saendalinga prestera Sydon-is.
De Gola, alzo heten de zendeling priesters of Sydon.
The Gola, as the missionary priests of Sydon were called
.

You do not need "GOLEM", the word "GOLA" could be a Hebrew/Phoenician word for people who spread out from their homeland (Lebanon/Judea).

Even the date the Greeks first settled in what was later to become Marseilles fits the word "GOLA": the Hebrews also travelled along with Greek merchants, and the date the Greeks settled in Marseilles is more or less the date the Hebrews started using the word "GOLA".

.

Edited by Abramelin, 19 February 2012 - 11:45 AM.


#10348    Otharus

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:45 AM

View PostOtharus, on 19 February 2012 - 10:16 AM, said:

GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)
correction:

Sídon priests


#10349    Alewyn

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 12:36 PM

View PostOtharus, on 18 February 2012 - 08:35 PM, said:

Gaules are called GOLA in OLB, but the meaning is not clear.
It is suggested that was the name of the sent priests from Sion. (p.60).
Some thoughts on the Gola from Sidon in Phoenicia:

OLB: The book of Adela’s followers (Chapter 25):

The Gola, as the missionary priests from Sidon were called, had noticed that the land there (Southern France) was sparsely populated and far from the Mother. In order to make themselves look good, they had themselves called in our language “truth devotees” (trowe widena); but they had better have been called “truth avoiders” (trowe wendena) or in short, “Triuwenden,” as our seafaring people afterwards called them.

Survivors of the Great Tsunami (Second Edition), Chapter 3, page 127:

The "Gola" called themselves "Trowe Widena" or "Treow-Wits" (Adherents or knowers of the Truth). The Frisians did not trust them at all and nicknamed them "Trowe Wendena" (truth avoiders) or "Truiwenden"  in short.

The pagan religions from the East now had the Fryan Federation in a pincher with the Magy and his Magyarar priests in the north and north-east and the Treowit priests with their Gola missionaries in the south and west. The "Gola" later become known as the "Gauls" and the name "Treowits" evolved into "Druids" – the mysterious leaders in ancient Gaul that destroyed Fryan monotheism and held sway over the people in Gallic religion.

(Druids: From Treow+Wit, literally meaning Knower of the truth.
See:  Treow (Old English, Anglo Saxon), Triuwi (Old Frisian) = Truth, and
Wit (Old English and Old Frisian) = Knowledge, understanding)


The Golan Heights, bordered by present-day Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, sounds suspiciously as though it may have been the origin of the ancient Gola priests (the Gola from Golan?) in nearby Sydon. "Golan" means "Captive" in Hebrew. The refuge town Golan is mentioned in the Bible in Deuteronomy 4:41-43 (RSV). If this supposition is correct, it would mean that the ancient Gauls had ties with the Golan Heights, which was annexed by Israel in 1981.


Edited by Alewyn, 19 February 2012 - 12:36 PM.


#10350    Otharus

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 12:36 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 19 February 2012 - 11:38 AM, said:

I think you make it difficult for yourself.
I like difficult, that's why I chose to study the OLB.

This idea, that started this morning, will lead to a breakthrough.

Give me some time to make my point.