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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#4081    The Puzzler

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 12:51 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 13 June 2013 - 06:34 PM, said:

The OLB uses a word, "atha", for 'friends', and it uses it all over the MS.

So I go by that.

-

"You showed it meant juryman yourself back a few posts."

Really??

+++

EDIT:

I checked, and I can't find the post where I did, according to you.



.
Post #4047.

Quote

In reality it means something entirely different:

a-th-th-a 40, a-t-t-a, e-t-t-a* (2), afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Geschworener; ne.
juryman
; Vw.: s. dik-, *e-, un-e-, ze-r-k-, -man-n; Hw.: s. ê-th-a (1); Q.: R, W, S,
Schw; E.: s. ê-th; W.: nfries. aita

I don't disagree it ' means'  friend and is used as such - but it's not really 'friend' coming from friend etymology but a friend must have been someone you took oath with originally and used as such in that form in the language of the OLB, which means the definition for atha as friend would be somewhat different than ' friend' so could be utilised in the language in more than one form of what we know as ' friend'.

You can actually find the true word  'friend'  in the OLB:

They said they were his friends
Thahwila Jes-us lêre vr irtha for, gvngon tha falxe prestera nêi-t lând sinra berta sin dâd avbêra, hja sêidon thaet hja fon sinum frjundum wêron

Edited by The Puzzler, 14 June 2013 - 12:52 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4082    Abramelin

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 07:25 PM

Ah, that's the one. No wonder I forgot about that post because I really didn't agree with that etymology myself.

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Yes, the OLB also uses a very Germanic word for friend, but it also uses "âtha" (friends) when it tries to explain the name "Athens".

I don't know about you, Puzz, but I still haven't found any Old Frisian (or any other Old Germanic) source using "âtha" in the meaning of 'friends'.


My father was born in Brabant, one of the two southern provinces of the Netherlands, and when he spoke in his dialect, he used "atte" or "atta" when he was talking about his father.

As you can see here, it dates from quite ancient times (Gothic) :

http://en.wikipedia....nguage#Examples


There's this Frisian boy's name, "Atte", and it means 'noble':

http://www.allebabyn...ensnamen/a/atte

But then there is also a (Frisian/German) boy's name, "Atta", and it means 'father'.

http://www.allebabyn...ensnamen/a/atta


Btw: the modern Frisian word for 'father' is "heit"


#4083    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 06:07 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 14 June 2013 - 07:25 PM, said:

Ah, that's the one. No wonder I forgot about that post because I really didn't agree with that etymology myself.

-

Yes, the OLB also uses a very Germanic word for friend, but it also uses "âtha" (friends) when it tries to explain the name "Athens".

I don't know about you, Puzz, but I still haven't found any Old Frisian (or any other Old Germanic) source using "âtha" in the meaning of 'friends'.


My father was born in Brabant, one of the two southern provinces of the Netherlands, and when he spoke in his dialect, he used "atte" or "atta" when he was talking about his father.

As you can see here, it dates from quite ancient times (Gothic) :

http://en.wikipedia....nguage#Examples


There's this Frisian boy's name, "Atte", and it means 'noble':

http://www.allebabyn...ensnamen/a/atte

But then there is also a (Frisian/German) boy's name, "Atta", and it means 'father'.

http://www.allebabyn...ensnamen/a/atta


Btw: the modern Frisian word for 'father' is "heit"
You're right,  couldn't find any atha as friends. (juryman speaks/works etc under oath imo - so is relative in that way)

That is when I looked elsewhere for the word and it's etymology, based in Frisian and my conclusion is the word atha is connected to oath. Which in the paragraph about Athens imo could be construed as an oath of friendship and protection. This subject is a big part of Critias (Plato) ending, to whit I see a similarity in the way people were 'friends' - they made oaths.

The word 'friend' is related to love, free etc - it's a different type of friendship and may not indicate the way the Athenians were, not ' friends'  but ' friends/oath kin)

atta as father and associated words is an enigma of it's own, but Huns use the same word.

Edited by The Puzzler, 15 June 2013 - 06:09 AM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4084    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 06:38 AM

atta as father could be a form of alt imo.

Thinking also that the OLB says salt became sat for those who spoke like the Greeks, and the sailors I think.

alta would be 'atta'  meaning at all times - highest.

Then to the word father would be a natural thing since he would have been the highest member of an immediate family and God the Father in Heaven, which is high-up.

Somehow I'd not be surprised if atta is a form of alta.

Another obscure etymology is atoll, a protection or barrier, a shield, which in itself sounds like a father and sounds relative to Atlas in his Atlantis mention.

Edited by The Puzzler, 15 June 2013 - 06:42 AM.

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#4085    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 June 2013 - 06:53 AM

Something caught my eye here:

Etymology

From Middle English ooth, oth, ath, from Old English āþ (“oath”), from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz (“oath”), from Proto-Indo-European *oyt- (“oath”). Cognate with Scots aith, athe (“oath”), North Frisian ith, iss (“oath”), West Frisian eed (“oath”), Dutch eed (“oath”), German Eid (“oath”), Swedish ed (“oath”), Icelandic eið (“oath”), Latin ūtor (“use, employ, avail”), Old Irish óeth (“oath”).
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/oath

salt-atha could be people employed to work for salt.

Related terms
:w00t:

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4086    NO-ID-EA

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 10:41 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 June 2013 - 06:53 AM, said:

Something caught my eye here:

Etymology

From Middle English ooth, oth, ath, from Old English āþ (“oath”), from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz (“oath”), from Proto-Indo-European *oyt- (“oath”). Cognate with Scots aith, athe (“oath”), North Frisian ith, iss (“oath”), West Frisian eed (“oath”), Dutch eed (“oath”), German Eid (“oath”), Swedish ed (“oath”), Icelandic eið (“oath”), Latin ūtor (“use, employ, avail”), Old Irish óeth (“oath”).
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/oath

salt-atha could be people employed to work for salt.

Related terms :w00t:
Or to work producing salt , wasn't that island next to Gadiz on the old map (cant remember which one though ) but the one where Abe was pre-occupied with Al Jazeira showing on it , called salt ?, but my memory is really bad i am afraid !

found the other day that the king of Palmyra circ 258/267 CE , was Oden-Athus , his wife was Zenobia Julia Aurelia Septima , Athenasius states she was Jewish in the "Historia Arianorum ad Monachus) which is also stated by Theodoret and Photius, .......after Odenathus was murdered , she procaimed herself Augustus ,and claimed the state of Palmyra (which included Governance of Syria , Egypt and Palestine at that time ) to be independant of Rome and Persia.
but Oden-atha makes you wonder if his God was Odin . ie friend of Odin


#4087    Abramelin

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 11:00 AM

Lucius Septimius Odaenathus, Odenathus or Odenatus (..), the Latinized form of the Syriac Odainath

(...)

His full name was Lucius Septimius Odainath. some opinion says that his name was of Aramaic origin., while another opinion says that his name is derived from the Arabic word "Odaina" which means "Little Ear". His gentilicium Septimius shows that his family received the Roman citizenship under an emperor of the Severan dynasty, and thus it was the leading family in Palmyra since the 190s. He was the son of Lucius Septimius Herod (Hairān), the "senator and chief of Tadmor", the son of Vaballathus (Wahballath), the son of Nasor.

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Odaenathus

I already know what other 'Germanic' name you will recognize in that quote, lol (hint: it starts with a -W-...)


And, btw.... you know what the island of Rhodes is called in the OLB? It's "Hrodus".  Herod is called "Herodes" in Greek and Dutch.


"Glass of water for Mr. Grainger!!" (= Jaylemurph, lol)


#4088    Abramelin

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 11:04 AM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 18 June 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

Or to work producing salt , wasn't that island next to Gadiz on the old map (cant remember which one though ) but the one where Abe was pre-occupied with Al Jazeira showing on it , called salt ?, but my memory is really bad i am afraid !


View PostAbramelin, on 10 April 2013 - 07:34 AM, said:

Ah ok, I see it now:

Posted Image

I got a bit distracted by the "Al-Gézira" name.

http://www.unexplain...65#entry4730375

The name of the island appears to be Saltis with a diacritic on top of the S.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 June 2013 - 11:07 AM.


#4089    The Puzzler

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 02:21 PM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 18 June 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

Or to work producing salt , wasn't that island next to Gadiz on the old map (cant remember which one though ) but the one where Abe was pre-occupied with Al Jazeira showing on it , called salt ?, but my memory is really bad i am afraid !

found the other day that the king of Palmyra circ 258/267 CE , was Oden-Athus , his wife was Zenobia Julia Aurelia Septima , Athenasius states she was Jewish in the "Historia Arianorum ad Monachus) which is also stated by Theodoret and Photius, .......after Odenathus was murdered , she procaimed herself Augustus ,and claimed the state of Palmyra (which included Governance of Syria , Egypt and Palestine at that time ) to be independant of Rome and Persia.
but Oden-atha makes you wonder if his God was Odin . ie friend of Odin
If they were soldiers and soldiers were paid in salt, they may have originally been known as salt-atha because they were employed for salt, which is what the part in the OLB is about.

(“use, employ, avail”),  (oath)

salt-atha = salt 'friend' = employee paid in salt

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4090    Abramelin

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 03:40 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 18 June 2013 - 02:21 PM, said:

If they were soldiers and soldiers were paid in salt, they may have originally been known as salt-atha because they were employed for salt, which is what the part in the OLB is about.

(“use, employ, avail”),  (oath)

salt-atha = salt 'friend' = employee paid in salt

The OLB clearly hints at a connection with the word "salt", just by the way the word "salt-atha" is split up.

Now, if the OLB would have been truely ancient as it purports to be, then "friends of salt" or something similar would not only have been the original meaning, but also the then current meaning.

In that case people who risked their lives at sea in a battle would get paid in salt.....

How likely you think that is?

In case you forgot: the sea IS salty.  It's like getting paid in sand when you work in the desert, lol.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 June 2013 - 04:10 PM.


#4091    lilthor

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:02 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 June 2013 - 03:40 PM, said:


In that case people who risked their lives at sea in a battle would get paid in salt.....

How likely you think that is?

In case you forgot: the sea IS salty.  It's like getting paid in sand when you work in the desert, lol.
.

Perhaps quite likely if processed salt was bartered or commonly used as a medium of exchange (money).

Getting paid in gold if you work in a gold mine doesn't sound too far off-kilter either


#4092    Abramelin

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 06:15 PM

View Postlilthor, on 18 June 2013 - 06:02 PM, said:

Perhaps quite likely if processed salt was bartered or commonly used as a medium of exchange (money).

Getting paid in gold if you work in a gold mine doesn't sound too far off-kilter either

My point was that salt could easily be extracted from a bowl of sea water.

What you do is this: collect sea water in a large bowl, and let it stand in the sun (could be done on a ship, but using a deeper vase or something). After a day in the sun, you'll have your salt, and for free, assuming you do it in the Med during summer, when it's bloody hot.

You can collect ore from some mine, but you can wait till hell freezes over if you think gold will magically precipitate.

In short: it is much more easy to get salt from the sea than gold from a mine.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 June 2013 - 06:16 PM.


#4093    Othar Winis

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 07:06 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 June 2013 - 03:40 PM, said:

In that case people who risked their lives at sea in a battle would get paid in salt.....

How likely you think that is?

In case you forgot: the sea IS salty.  It's like getting paid in sand when you work in the desert, lol.


"It is commonly believed that Roman soldiers were at certain times paid with salt. (They say the soldiers who did their job well were "worth their salt.") The word 'salary' derives from the Latin word salārium, possibly referring to money given to soldiers so they could buy salt. The Roman Republic and Empire controlled the price of salt, increasing it to raise money for wars, or lowering it to be sure that the poorest citizens could easily afford this important part of the diet.

It was also of high value to the Hebrews, Greeks, the Chinese, Hittites and other peoples of antiquity."

etc.

source: http://en.wikipedia....History_of_salt

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4094    Abramelin

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 07:34 PM

View Postgestur, on 18 June 2013 - 07:06 PM, said:

[/size]

"It is commonly believed that Roman soldiers were at certain times paid with salt. (They say the soldiers who did their job well were "worth their salt.") The word 'salary' derives from the Latin word salārium, possibly referring to money given to soldiers so they could buy salt. The Roman Republic and Empire controlled the price of salt, increasing it to raise money for wars, or lowering it to be sure that the poorest citizens could easily afford this important part of the diet.

It was also of high value to the Hebrews, Greeks, the Chinese, Hittites and other peoples of antiquity."

etc.

source: http://en.wikipedia....History_of_salt

And that is about people living on the land (farmers), not about SAILORS.

And it is also too late for anything OLB.

Well, if we have to believe the OLB isn't a fake MS...... which I think it is.


#4095    lilthor

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 08:16 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 June 2013 - 07:34 PM, said:

And that is about people living on the land (farmers), not about SAILORS.

And it is also too late for anything OLB.

Well, if we have to believe the OLB isn't a fake MS...... which I think it is.

Not to belabor the point, but humans have likely valued, collected, and traded salt since before the dawn of history.





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