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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#4171    Othar Winis

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 06:23 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 24 June 2013 - 11:23 PM, said:

Do you have any etymology for "bukja"?

You haven't, right?

Nothing at all that comes close to anything meaning "girl".
Simple.

If BUK (buik) can mean "mother's body" (moederlijf), then the diminutive BUKJA can mean "young mother's body" => girl

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4172    Othar Winis

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 07:23 AM

View PostFrom 24 June 2013 - 11:34 PM:

Right, not exactly the same as 'friend',  and NOT the opposite of 'enemy'.

If you google the combination enemies and allies, you'll see that they are often used as opposites, which of course they are (just like enemies and friends, or friends and foes).

Posted Image

Edited by gestur, 25 June 2013 - 07:29 AM.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4173    The Puzzler

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 11:41 AM

View Postgestur, on 24 June 2013 - 05:29 PM, said:

WTF are you talking about?

"Buik, in onze bet., in 't mnl. ook balch geheeten; ook in die van moederlijf" (http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik) => belly, mother's body

Your attempts to ridicule the OLB (through its language) don't favor your credibility.

I found these:

būk 23, bū-k, afries., st. M. (a): nhd. Bauch, Rumpf; ne. belly, trunk; ÜG.: lat. venter AB (9, 27); Vw.: s. -fest, -fest-e, -lam-ithe, -wu-n-d-e; Hw.: vgl. got. *būks, an. būkr, ae. būc, anfrk. būk, ahd. būh, plattd. buuk; Q.: S, W, E, AB (9, 27); E.: germ. *būka-, *būkaz, st. M. (a), Bauch, Leib; s. idg. *beu- (2), *bu-, *bʰeū̆-, *bʰū̆-, V., blasen, schwellen, Pokorny 98; W.: nfries. buwck; W.: saterl. buc; L.: Hh 13a, Rh 673a
būkfest 1 und häufiger, bū-k-fest, afries., Adj.: nhd. „bauchfest“, mannbar; ne. marriageable; E.: s. bū-k, fest (2); L.: Hh 13a
būkfeste 1 und häufiger, bū-k-fest-e, afries., F.: nhd. Mannbarkeit; ne. puberty; E.: s. bū-k, *fest-e (3); L.: Hh 13a
http://www.koeblerge...s/afries_b.html

All relating to what appears to be a girls journey to womanhood, with her swollen belly, possibly meaning a pregnant girl - or a young girl of marriageable age.

Edited by The Puzzler, 25 June 2013 - 11:43 AM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4174    Othar Winis

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 04:02 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 24 June 2013 - 11:31 PM, said:

And when are you going to admit you are "Otharus"?
Why אברהם, so you can backstab me like you did him?

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4175    Othar Winis

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 04:09 PM

What has not been noted yet, is that the word for soldiers SALT.ÁTHA, is not used for warriers/ defenders of the Fryans themselves.

It can therefore originally be like a sobriquet (mocking-/ scoffing-word):

'friends'/ 'allies' as long as they get paid (with salt).

Fragments:

1. Gértmen

[073/14]
SALT.ATHA FON THA WILDE BERCHFOLKUM

[073/18]
DRÉI AS HJA THJU HÁVA INNOMTH HÉDE.
WILDON THA WILDA SALT.ÁTHA THŔT THORP ŔND VSA SKIPA BIRÁWA.
ÉN SALT.ÁTHE HÉDE AL EN BUKJA SKŔND.

[074/25]
THENE KÉNING FON THÍRHIS ŔFTERNÉI SJANDE
THAT SIN ALDERBESTA STJURAR WÉI BRIT WÉREN
SAND AL SIN SKIPA MITH SINA WILDE SALT.ÁTHA
VMBER DÁD JEFTA LÉVAND TO FÁTANE

2. Ljudgért I

[121/25]
NW GVNG.ER [:ALEXANDRE] TO ŔND KÁS ALTHAM UT SIN FOLK ŔND UT SINA SALT.ATHA
THÉR WENATH WÉRON WR.NE SÉ TO FÁRANE

[122/05]
HI [:ALEXANDRE] HÉDE SINA SALT.ATHA BÁMA KAPJA LÉTA

[122/10]
THACH THA SALT.ATHA THÉR FON THET BERG.LAND KÉMON WÉRON ANG TO FARA SÉ.

[122/19]
HI WILDE THA SALT.ATHA THRVCH SIN AJN FOLK OMBRENSA LÉTA

[123/20]
THA WI BI THÉRE ÉUPHRAT KÉMON.
GVNG NÉARCHUS MITH THA SALT.ATHA ŔND FÉLO FON SIN FOLK WAL VP

[125/03]
FORTH GVNGON WI SALT.ÁTHA LIFTOCHTA ŔND WÉPNE FÁRA

[125/18]
DÉMÉTRIUS WN THÉRE KÉSE.
THA NAVT THRVCH SINA SALT.ÁTHA

[125/25]
AFTERNÉI GVNG DÉMTRIUS LÁS VP HRODUS.
THÉR HINNE BROCHTON WI SINA SALT.ÁTHA ÁND LIFTOCHTA WR

3. Ljudgért II

[165/11]
THISA MINSKA SIND WÉRENTLIK ÍRA BONAR.
THÉR AMMER MITH HJARA HORSA VP OVERA FJELDA DWÁLA.
THÉR AMMER JÁGJA ŔND RÁWA
ŔND THÉR HJARA SELVA ALS SALT.ÁTHA FORHÉRA ANTHA OMHÉMMANDE FORSTA

4. Rika's letter

[190/22]
FORI THENE SKŔT THAM THÉROF KÉM
HÉRADON HJA VRLANDISKA SALT.ÁTHA.

5. Black Adel

[197/11]
HÉMIS DÉGA SEND HJA MITH VSA VRBRUDA BROTHARUM ŔND HJARA SALT.ÁTHUM
AL OVERA SKELDA KVMEN.

[197/26]
THA GOLA MÉJEATH THEN THA NITHER LÉGA
FON HJARA HELPAR AND SALT.ÁTHUM VPPA VSA FJELDUM SKRÍWA
MITH.ET BLOD THŔT UT HJARA WNDUM DRJUPTH

[201/19]
THŔT FOLK WÉRMITH HI WITH THA SALT.ÁTHUM THERA GOLUM KŔMPED HÉDE
HÉD.ER UT.A SAXANA.MARKUM LVKTH
MITH LOFTE FON GRÁTE HÉRA.RÁVE ŔND BUT

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4176    Othar Winis

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 08:27 AM

Notice that only in the three fragments from the text about Black Adel, the plural is spelled SALT.ÁTHUM.

In the other (older) ones it is SALT.ÁTHA / SALT.ATHA (singular: SALT.ÁTHE is used only once in fragment 1.2).

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4177    donaldon

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 11:54 PM

P43 "When our land was submerged I was in Schoonland. It was very bad there. There were great lakes which rose from the earth like bubbles, then burst asunder, and from the rents flowed a stuff like red-hot iron. The tops of high mountains fell and destroyed whole forests and villages. I myself saw one mountain torn from another and fall straight down. When I afterwards went to see the place there was a lake there.    

Similar lake eruptions were recorded in Ireland by the authors of Annals of the Four Masters.
In 505 BC Lough Melvin in Co. Donegal burst forth.
In 1409 BC several lakes burst forth and the sea flooded coastal lands in Donegal Bay.
In 1448 BC Lough Erne burst forth.
These eruptions could have ben caused by melting of subterranean ice and permafrost left as residue from the Ice Age.
Is it possible that Schoonland was Iceland?

The book Atlantis of the North by Jurgen Spanuth  (Sidgwick and Jackson 1976) discusses evidence for the flooding of the Heligoland 'Peninsula'.
P212 "The tradition of Asgard contains memories of a Holy Island that sank into the sea about 1200 BC".
There is abundant archaeological evidence that much of the North Sea was dry land much earlier, in the Mesolithic about 8000 years ago.

I have just come across OLB and first impressions are that it could provide further insight into the Classical world; of course it needs careful cross-checking against  semi-mythical annals and sagas and especially withother more reliable Classical sources.
Attached File  AtlantisScan-130630-0001.jpg   130.62K   1 downloads


#4178    Othar Winis

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 06:30 AM

View Postdonaldon, on 29 June 2013 - 11:54 PM, said:

I have just come across OLB and first impressions are that it could provide further insight into the Classical world; of course it needs careful cross-checking against  semi-mythical annals and sagas and especially withother more reliable Classical sources.

Thank you for writing Donaldon, and welcome to the forum.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4179    Abramelin

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 10:53 PM

View Postgestur, on 25 June 2013 - 06:23 AM, said:

Simple.

If BUK (buik) can mean "mother's body" (moederlijf), then the diminutive BUKJA can mean "young mother's body" => girl

And we all know that is bs.


#4180    Abramelin

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 10:55 PM

View Postdonaldon, on 29 June 2013 - 11:54 PM, said:

P43 "When our land was submerged I was in Schoonland. It was very bad there. There were great lakes which rose from the earth like bubbles, then burst asunder, and from the rents flowed a stuff like red-hot iron. The tops of high mountains fell and destroyed whole forests and villages. I myself saw one mountain torn from another and fall straight down. When I afterwards went to see the place there was a lake there.

Similar lake eruptions were recorded in Ireland by the authors of Annals of the Four Masters.
In 505 BC Lough Melvin in Co. Donegal burst forth.
In 1409 BC several lakes burst forth and the sea flooded coastal lands in Donegal Bay.
In 1448 BC Lough Erne burst forth.
These eruptions could have ben caused by melting of subterranean ice and permafrost left as residue from the Ice Age.
Is it possible that Schoonland was Iceland?

The book Atlantis of the North by Jurgen Spanuth  (Sidgwick and Jackson 1976) discusses evidence for the flooding of the Heligoland 'Peninsula'.
P212 "The tradition of Asgard contains memories of a Holy Island that sank into the sea about 1200 BC".
There is abundant archaeological evidence that much of the North Sea was dry land much earlier, in the Mesolithic about 8000 years ago.

I have just come across OLB and first impressions are that it could provide further insight into the Classical world; of course it needs careful cross-checking against  semi-mythical annals and sagas and especially withother more reliable Classical sources.
Attachment AtlantisScan-130630-0001.jpg

I have been cut off from gas/electricity, so I am using the computer of my neighbour now.

If you want to discuss Irish legends, ask Cormac. He's of Irish descent.

This has been discussed before.


#4181    Abramelin

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 10:56 PM

View Postgestur, on 25 June 2013 - 04:02 PM, said:

Why אברהם, so you can backstab me like you did him?

I never did, and you are nothing but his sockpuppet.


#4182    Othar Winis

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 02:41 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 01 July 2013 - 10:53 PM, said:

And we all know that is bs.

Speak for yourself. Puzzler and I see it.
You must be the only one who does not get it.

BUKJA is diminutive from BUK.

ONW (Oudnederlands Woordenboek, Olddutch dictionary):
http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik

būk - Modern lemma: buik
Moederschoot, baarmoeder, buik
=> (mothers-) womb, uterus, belly

MNW (Middelnederlands Woordenboek, Middledutch dictionary):
http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik

BUUC - Varianten: buyc, buke, buc - Modern lemma: buik
Buik, in onze bet., in 't mnl. ook balch geheeten; ook in die van moederlijf
=> can mean mothers body

Conlusion: BUKJA for young woman is plausible, as it already was from the context.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#4183    The Puzzler

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:10 PM

View Postgestur, on 02 July 2013 - 02:41 PM, said:

Speak for yourself. Puzzler and I see it.
You must be the only one who does not get it.

BUKJA is diminutive from BUK.

ONW (Oudnederlands Woordenboek, Olddutch dictionary):
http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik

būk - Modern lemma: buik
Moederschoot, baarmoeder, buik
=> (mothers-) womb, uterus, belly

MNW (Middelnederlands Woordenboek, Middledutch dictionary):
http://gtb.inl.nl/iW...&lemmodern=buik

BUUC - Varianten: buyc, buke, buc - Modern lemma: buik
Buik, in onze bet., in 't mnl. ook balch geheeten; ook in die van moederlijf
=> can mean mothers body

Conlusion: BUKJA for young woman is plausible, as it already was from the context.

Here's an interesting word link:

Middle Low German

Etymology

From Old Saxon būk, from Proto-Germanic *būkaz (“belly, body”). Cognate with German Bauch (“belly”).

Synonyms
  lif (body, figurative for belly)
NOTE mage (stomach)

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian maga, from Proto-Germanic *magô. Compare English maw, Low German mage, Dutch maag, German Magen, Danish mave, Swedish mage, Icelandic magi.
Noun

mage
  • stomach

  • http://en.wiktionary...ddle_Low_German

    If I'm not mistaken this is probable to why women are called Maagden and such in Germanic...?? Women who are pregnant, mothers with a belly.

    Etymology 2

    From Proto-Germanic *magô, from Indo-European *mak- ‘bag, belly’. Cognate with Old Frisian maga (West Frisian mage), Old Saxon mago (Low German mage), Middle Dutch maghe (Dutch maag), Old High German mago (German Magen), Old Norse magi (Swedish mage). The Indo-European root is also the source of Celtic *makno- (Welsh megin ‘bellows’), Slavic *mošьnā (Old Church Slavonic мошьна, Russian мошна (“pocket, bag”)), Baltic *maka- (Lithuanian mãkas ‘purse’).
Etymology 3

From Proto-Germanic *mēgô (“relative, in-law”), from Proto-Indo-European *mag'- (“to be able, help”). Cognate with Old Frisian mēch (“relative, kinsman”), Old Saxon māg (“a relation”), Old High German māg (“relative, kinsman”), Old Norse mágr (“father-in-law”), Gothic �������� (megs, “son-in-law”). More at may.

http://en.wiktionary...aga#Old_Frisian

Same page into Spanish -

Spanish

Noun

maga f (plural magas)


Edited by The Puzzler, 04 July 2013 - 12:15 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4184    The Puzzler

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:22 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 01 July 2013 - 10:53 PM, said:

And we all know that is bs.
Why would it be? I showed this, maybe you missed it...

I found these:

būk 23, bū-k, afries., st. M. (a): nhd. Bauch, Rumpf; ne. belly, trunk; ÜG.: lat. venter AB (9, 27); Vw.: s. -fest, -fest-e, -lam-ithe, -wu-n-d-e; Hw.: vgl. got. *būks, an. būkr, ae. būc, anfrk. būk, ahd. būh, plattd. buuk; Q.: S, W, E, AB (9, 27); E.: germ. *būka-, *būkaz, st. M. (a), Bauch, Leib; s. idg. *beu- (2), *bu-, *bʰeū̆-, *bʰū̆-, V., blasen, schwellen, Pokorny 98; W.: nfries. buwck; W.: saterl. buc; L.: Hh 13a, Rh 673a
būkfest 1 und häufiger, bū-k-fest, afries., Adj.: nhd. „bauchfest“, mannbar; ne. marriageable; E.: s. bū-k, fest (2); L.: Hh 13a
būkfeste 1 und häufiger, bū-k-fest-e, afries., F.: nhd. Mannbarkeit; ne. puberty; E.: s. bū-k, *fest-e (3); L.: Hh 13a
http://www.koeblerge...s/afries_b.html

Sounds to me related to women and girls, particularly towards pregnancy.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4185    The Puzzler

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:32 PM

View Postdonaldon, on 29 June 2013 - 11:54 PM, said:

P43 "When our land was submerged I was in Schoonland. It was very bad there. There were great lakes which rose from the earth like bubbles, then burst asunder, and from the rents flowed a stuff like red-hot iron. The tops of high mountains fell and destroyed whole forests and villages. I myself saw one mountain torn from another and fall straight down. When I afterwards went to see the place there was a lake there.

Similar lake eruptions were recorded in Ireland by the authors of Annals of the Four Masters.
In 505 BC Lough Melvin in Co. Donegal burst forth.
In 1409 BC several lakes burst forth and the sea flooded coastal lands in Donegal Bay.
In 1448 BC Lough Erne burst forth.
These eruptions could have ben caused by melting of subterranean ice and permafrost left as residue from the Ice Age.
Is it possible that Schoonland was Iceland?

The book Atlantis of the North by Jurgen Spanuth  (Sidgwick and Jackson 1976) discusses evidence for the flooding of the Heligoland 'Peninsula'.
P212 "The tradition of Asgard contains memories of a Holy Island that sank into the sea about 1200 BC".
There is abundant archaeological evidence that much of the North Sea was dry land much earlier, in the Mesolithic about 8000 years ago.

I have just come across OLB and first impressions are that it could provide further insight into the Classical world; of course it needs careful cross-checking against  semi-mythical annals and sagas and especially withother more reliable Classical sources.
Attachment AtlantisScan-130630-0001.jpg
Hi, thanks for your contribution. Schoonland appears to be Sweden in the OLB.

I'd never heard of the Irish Lake eruptions and will check them out more in comparison with what the OLB describes. I really always wished I had a copy of Spanuths book too, sounds very interesting read.

The tradition of Asgard might imo have some relation to the impact of Kaali into Saaremaa, Estonia, which is Asaland country in that timeframe, it's not really known when it hit but it is plausible it was in the Bronze Age or early iron age imo and sent many people who lived in that area south with stories of the impact, maybe they used the iron after that, stories which then made it into Greek myths and possible early Celtic connections, maybe these people became Celts when they moved south after the impact.

Why do the Celts know the story so well? Baltic amber found in Mycenaean graves...

At these words, Dionysos rejoiced in hope of victory; then he questioned Hermes and wished to hear more of the Olympian tale which the Celts of the west know well: how Phaethon tumbled over and over through the air, and why even the Heliades (Daughters of Helios) were changed into trees beside the moaning Eridanos, and from their leafy trees drop sparkling tears into the stream [the source of amber]
http://www.theoi.com...n/Phaethon.html


Scholars maintain that the event figured prominently in regional mythology. It was, and still is, considered a sacred lake. There is archaeological evidence that it may well have been a place of ritual sacrifice. At some point during the early Iron Age, the lake was surrounded by a stone wall 470 meters long, with a median width of about 2.5 meters and an average height of 2.0 meters.[citation needed]
Finnish mythology has stories that may originate with the formation of Kaali. One of them is in runes 47, 48 and 49 of the Kalevala epic: Louhi, the evil wizard, steals the Sun and fire from people, causing total darkness. Ukko, the god of the sky, orders a new Sun to be made from a spark. The virgin of the air starts to make a new Sun, but the spark drops from the sky and hits the ground. This spark goes to an "Aluen" or "Kalevan"[5] lake and causes its water to rise. Finnish heroes see the ball of fire falling somewhere "behind the Neva river" (the direction of Estonia from Karelia). The heroes head that direction to seek fire, and they finally gather flames from a forest fire.
According to a theory first proposed by Lennart Meri, it is possible that Saaremaa was the legendary Thule island, first mentioned by ancient Greek geographer Pytheas, whereas the name "Thule" could have been connected to the Finnic word tule ("(of) fire") and the folklore of Estonia, which depicts the birth of the crater lake in Kaali. Kaali was considered the place where "The sun went to rest."

http://en.wikipedia....ki/Kaali_crater

Edited by The Puzzler, 04 July 2013 - 12:34 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...




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