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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#3451    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:35 PM

Puzz, your Wiki link also says this:

The name derives from the Latin tunica, the basic garment worn by both men and women in Ancient Rome, which in turn was based on earlier Greek garments.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunic

And how did those Greeks call these garments?

CHITON.

χιτών, khitōn

Posted Image

Edited by Abramelin, 09 April 2013 - 05:46 PM.


#3452    Jan Ott

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:38 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2013 - 12:27 PM, said:

you sure you're not Otharus?

When a student is mistaken for her teacher, it is a compliment.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#3453    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:38 PM

View Postgestur, on 09 April 2013 - 05:34 PM, said:

Many allright, certainly not all and besides seperate words I do whole fragments too.
Remember the Frisia maps?

Here's something else, for the shortsighted paper research team:


Source: wikipedia/Cai_Lun

Posted Image

Frisia maps. Are they really ancient, like 4000 to 3000 years old? I thought not.


#3454    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:43 PM

View Postgestur, on 09 April 2013 - 05:38 PM, said:

When a student is mistaken for her teacher, it is a compliment.

It means she blindly copies what her teacher told her.

Or - in this case - the two are one and the same person.


#3455    Jan Ott

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:45 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2013 - 05:10 PM, said:

Apparently you didn't click the links about metathesis:

I know that sounds can change, but I have seen more beliefworthy examples.

If it would be the only available option, I would be willing to consider it, but I just said and still say, that the Oldfrisian option is more plausible.
It does not need the metathesis-explanation which is more far-fetched.

I repeat: this thread has an overwhelming number of Oldfrisian (and other Nordic) etymologies that are much better than the oldschool ones.
It can no longer be denied that a new way of looking at etymology will have to be seriously considered.

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#3456    Jan Ott

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:46 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2013 - 05:38 PM, said:

Frisia maps.

That was a reply to your BS remark "most if not all of your posts are about dissecting words".

Posted Image "Saved from the Flood" ~ Oera-Linda studies ~ http://fryskednis.blogspot.com

#3457    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:51 PM

View Postgestur, on 09 April 2013 - 05:45 PM, said:

I know that sounds can change, but I have seen more beliefworthy examples.

If it would be the only available option, I would be willing to consider it, but I just said and still say, that the Oldfrisian option is more plausible.
It does not need the metathesis-explanation which is more far-fetched.

I repeat: this thread has an overwhelming number of Oldfrisian (and other Nordic) etymologies that are much better than the oldschool ones.
It can no longer be denied that a new way of looking at etymology will have to be seriously considered.

Your point of view will become more acceptable when you provide us with truly ancient sources.

The Old Frisian dictionaries we all here use are from the 10th to the 13th century. Much older sources are the Greek and Roman ones, even the Phoenician ones.

And if you think the metathesis explanation is far-fetched, then you don't know how words are being adopted and changed.


#3458    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 05:52 PM

View Postgestur, on 09 April 2013 - 05:46 PM, said:

That was a reply to your BS remark "most if not all of your posts are about dissecting words".

But they are, lol.

I think Puzz and I are the only ones in this thread who quote from really ancient sources and archeology.


#3459    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 06:25 PM

Gestur, I'd like you to read this thread I started a couple of days ago:

http://www.unexplain...howtopic=245911

It's about an unknown civilization, and notice how old it is...

I am not averse of accepting evidence of an unknown ancient civilization, quite the opposite, but I prefer archeological finds above nitpicking about words.


#3460    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 06:50 PM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 09 April 2013 - 01:35 PM, said:

i would say in three stages , 1st just the king and his court ,in 597 bc , the 2nd en-masse in 587 bc , and the 3rd in 582 bc



from page 123 of Tresoar .......that is thruch tha Dorra Wostena , that is thruch et land that Irtha upheid uta sea .  tha hiu hiv strete after usa ETHELA up heide as hia Inna Rade se kemon..

That is through the land that irtha had heaved up out of the sea , when she had raised up the strait as soon as OUR FOREFATHERS had passed into the Red Sea ..( They seem to think they are jewish ethnicity at this point )

and then Cy-RUS eventually overcame the Babylonians and set them free .


The Jews were the slaves in Slavia , working for the  Babylonians is my guess ,

that is thruch tha Dorra Wostena = that is through the arid desert (DU: "dorre woestijn").

They seem to think they are jewish ethnicity at this point - No, it's just that their forefathers passed through the Strait and entered the Red Sea..

=

The name Cyrus is a Latinized form derived from a Greek form of the Old Persian Kūruš. The name and its meaning has been recorded in ancient inscriptions in different languages. The ancient Greek historians Ctesias and Plutarch noted that Cyrus was named from Kuros, the Sun, a concept which has been interpreted as meaning "like the Sun" (Khurvash) by noting its relation to the Persian noun for sun, khor, while using -vash as a suffix of likeness.

http://en.wikipedia....Cyrus_the_Great

.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 April 2013 - 06:51 PM.


#3461    NO-ID-EA

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 08:11 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2013 - 06:50 PM, said:

that is thruch tha Dorra Wostena = that is through the arid desert (DU: "dorre woestijn").

They seem to think they are jewish ethnicity at this point - No, it's just that their forefathers passed through the Strait and entered the Red Sea..

=

The name Cyrus is a Latinized form derived from a Greek form of the Old Persian Kūru¨. The name and its meaning has been recorded in ancient inscriptions in different languages. The ancient Greek historians Ctesias and Plutarch noted that Cyrus was named from Kuros, the Sun, a concept which has been interpreted as meaning "like the Sun" (Khurvash) by noting its relation to the Persian noun for sun, khor, while using -vash as a suffix of likeness.

http://en.wikipedia....Cyrus_the_Great

.
.......Come on .... they are deffinately alluding to the time the strait was raised as SOON as their ETHELA had passed through ,( as per the Sandbach translation ) and so they are claiming the same ethnicity as those in the biblical story .............and not just that their forefathers passed through it at sometime .

Edited by NO-ID-EA, 09 April 2013 - 08:18 PM.


#3462    The Puzzler

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 02:56 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2013 - 05:21 PM, said:

Gadir and Gades have no etymological relationship. Gades is nothing but the way the Romans start calling Gadir after Scipio conquered the city.

And why did the Romans give it the name "Gades"? Most likely because the Phoenicians considered it to be a 'holy city', Qadesh, and used that word in daily use.

-

I can't remember right now what Old Frisian word you used, but the closest Old Frisian word to "Gadir" I found is "gaderia", or 'gathering'. Like I said a while back, it had everything to do with "people/things close together within one area".

No, the word was more like tohnekka, with mixed consonants, it's OK, I'll search the topic here.

Greeks called it Gadeiros, so my guess is Roman Gades is a variation of this word, a shorter form.

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#3463    The Puzzler

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 04:08 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2013 - 05:35 PM, said:

Puzz, your Wiki link also says this:

The name derives from the Latin tunica, the basic garment worn by both men and women in Ancient Rome, which in turn was based on earlier Greek garments.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunic

And how did those Greeks call these garments?

CHITON.

χιτών, khitōn

Posted Image

I know what you're saying but I think there are enough allowances for it to be a different word.

That is cotton, coat, probably even curtain - I do not think it is tunic. Tunica in Latin could come from Fryan, is my stance.

The khiton was a tunic type garment though.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#3464    Abramelin

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 05:39 AM

View PostNO-ID-EA, on 09 April 2013 - 08:11 PM, said:

.......Come on .... they are deffinately alluding to the time the strait was raised as SOON as their ETHELA had passed through ,( as per the Sandbach translation ) and so they are claiming the same ethnicity as those in the biblical story .............and not just that their forefathers passed through it at sometime .

Kêmon wi anda muda thêre Êuphrat, sa machton wi thêr en stêd kiasa jeftha omkêra, vs lân skold vs êvin blyd to dêlath wrde. An tha nya skêpa, thêr tha brônd vntkvma wêron, let-er Johniar aend Krêkalandar gâ. Hi selva gvng mith sin ôra folk allingen thêre kâd thrvch tha dorra wostêna, thaet is thrvch et land thaet Irtha vphêid hêde uta sê, tha hju thju strête after vsa êthela vphêide as hja inna Râde sê kêmon.
Tha wy to ny Gêrtmanja kêmon...


When we arrived at the mouth of the Euphrates, we might either choose a place to settle there or come back. Our pay would be guaranteed to us the same in either case. Upon the new ships which had been saved from the fire he embarked the Joniers and the Greeks. He himself went with the rest of his people along the coast, through the barren wilderness; that is, through the land that she had heaved up out of the sea when she had raised up the strait as soon as our forefathers had passed into the Red Sea.
When we arrived at New Gertmania...


http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bp

Posted Image

He went from the mouth of the Euphrates to New Geertmania (Carmania on the map). The land he passed had been heaved out of the sea, at the same time as when the Suez Strait had been heaved up out of the sea after their forefathers had passed through it.


#3465    Abramelin

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 05:49 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 10 April 2013 - 04:08 AM, said:

I know what you're saying but I think there are enough allowances for it to be a different word.

That is cotton, coat, probably even curtain - I do not think it is tunic. Tunica in Latin could come from Fryan, is my stance.

The khiton was a tunic type garment though.

So the Romans adopted a garment from the Greeks, a garment the Greeks called khiton, and which the Romans called tunica.

For me it's a simple and clear example of metathesis.





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