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Global Maps of Saturns Moons


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19 replies to this topic

#16    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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    Oscar Wilde

Posted 07 August 2008 - 10:34 PM

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The Enceladus Atlas
August 6, 2008

Presented here is a complete set of cartographic map sheets from a high-resolution Enceladus atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

The map sheets form a 15-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Enceladus at a nominal scale of 1:500,000. An index for the atlas is included here, along with an unlabeled version of each terrain section. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Enceladus used for projection of the maps is 252.1 kilometers (156.6 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

***ERRATA (2008-02-13): Longitude System Discrepancy*** The maps presented here did not account for the most recent recommendations by the International Astronomical Union cartography working group as described in Seidelmann et al., 2007. There is a slight difference (about 0.9 degrees) between the longitudes given in this atlas and the IAU definition. With the new recommendations, crater Salih should have a fixed longitude of 5 degrees West. Crater Salih is hardly visible in the Cassini images therefore the exact consequences of preparation of these maps without the new recommendations is difficult to estimate. Crater Salih will be imaged with better resolution during the upcoming Enceladus flybys in 2008. The imaging team will use these coming images to determine the exact shift between the current atlas and the IAU definition and will release a corrected (shifted) version of this atlas in 2009.

References:

(1) Davies, M. E. and Katayama, F. Y., The control networks of Mimas and Enceladus, Icarus, 53, 332-340, 1983 (2) Seidelmann, P. K. and 14 co-authors, Report of the IAU/IAGWorking Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2006, Celestial Mech. Dyn. Astr., 98, 155-180, 2007.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#17    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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    Oscar Wilde

Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:09 PM

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The Iapetus Atlas
October 17, 2008

Presented here is a complete set of cartographic map sheets from a high-resolution Iapetus atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

The map sheets form a three-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Iapetus. As noted on the map, while both Saragossa Terra and Roncevaux Terra are bright regions on the moon's surface, they are distinct from each other in that the former has a slightly reddish color and the latter does not.

The map sheets cover the entire surface of Iapetus at a nominal scale of 1:3,000,000. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Iapetus used for projection of the maps is 736 kilometers (457 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#18    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:12 PM

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Map of Iapetus - May 2008
October 17, 2008

This global map of Saturn’s moon Iapetus was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

Iapetus is the moon of Saturn which, curiously, has one bright hemisphere and one dark.

The map is an equidistant (simple cylindrical) projection and has a scale of 803 meters (0.5 miles) per pixel at the equator. Some territory seen in this map was imaged by Cassini using reflected light from Saturn. The mean radius of Iapetus used for projection of this map is 736 kilometers (457 miles). The resolution of the map is 16 pixels per degree. This mosaic map is an update to the version released in January 2008 (See Map of Iapetus - Januarly 2008).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#19    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

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  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:15 PM

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The Mimas Atlas
October 17, 2008

Presented here is a cartographic map sheet which forms a high-resolution Mimas atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

Mimas, as imaged by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s, has a very large, distinguishing crater that makes it look like the “Death Star.” As shown in this map, that crater is named Herschel.

The map sheets form a three-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Mimas at a nominal scale of 1:1,500,000. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Mimas used for projection of the maps is 198.2 kilometers (123.2 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#20    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,180 posts
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  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:21 PM

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Map of Mimas - May 2008
October 17, 2008

This global map of Saturn’s moon Mimas was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

The moon's large, distinguishing crater, Herschel, is seen on the map at left.

The map is an equidistant (simple cylindrical) projection and has a scale of 432 meters (1,417 feet) per pixel at the equator. The mean radius of Mimas used for projection of this map is 198.2 kilometers (123.2 miles). The resolution of the map is 8 pixels per degree. This mosaic map is an update to the version released in January 2008 (See Map of Mimas - December 2006).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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