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STS-122 MCC Status Reports


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#16    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:54 PM

02.15.08
Friday, February 15, 2008 - 4:00 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-16


STS-122 MCC Status Report #16


HOUSTON – The seven-member crew of space shuttle Atlantis is just one spacewalk away from finishing the installation of the new Columbus research module and its exterior experiment facilities.

The crew’s day started at 2:45 a.m. Their wake up call from the Mission Control Center featured Drafi Deutscher’s song “Marmor Stein und Eisen Bricht.” The song’s title translates as “Marble Breaks and Iron Bends.” It was played for Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel, a European Space Agency astronaut from Germany.

The mission’s third spacewalk is scheduled to begin at 7:40 a.m. At that time, the space station’s robotic arm will transfer the first of two external experiment facilities – an observatory used to monitor the sun, called SOLAR – to the Columbus module for installation. That task should take Mission Specialists Rex Walheim and Stanley Love about three hours.

On its way back to the shuttle’s cargo bay to retrieve the second experiment facility to be installed, the robotic arm will pick up a failed control moment gyroscope that was replaced in August and take it back to Atlantis to be returned to Earth.

After dropping that gyroscope off, the robotic arm will pick up the European Technology Exposure Facility – or EuTEF, a facility that will allow scientists to expose experiments to space. Love and Walheim are scheduled to spend about an hour and 45 minutes on that task, which should begin around 11:50 a.m.

If there’s any time left in the 6 hour and 25 minute-long spacewalk, the astronauts will inspect a damaged handrail on the Quest Airlock that may be the source of recent spacesuit glove cuts and take another look at the station’s right Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, which began experiencing problems last fall. The spacewalk is scheduled to end at 2:05 p.m.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued this evening or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #16

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#17    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 08:33 AM

02.15.08
Friday, February 16, 2008 - 5:00 p.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-17


STS-122 MCC Status Report #17


HOUSTON – Astronauts Rex Walheim and Stan Love today spent seven hours and 25 minutes completing the third and final spacewalk of the STS-122 mission. Walheim and Love worked to transfer the first of two external experiment facilities – an observatory used to monitor the sun, called SOLAR – to the Columbus module for installation. Pilot Alan Poindexter worked to guide Walheim and Love from inside the International Space Station, while Mission Specialist Leland Melvin operated the station’s robotic arm to guide the astronauts and experiments to the proper locations.

After the installation of SOLAR, the crew transferred a failed gyroscope that controls the orientation of the ISS into Atlantis’ payload bay so it can be returned to Earth. The two astronauts completed the final major objective of the mission by installing a second experiment onto the outside of Columbus, the European Technology Exposure Facility (EuTEF). This experiment will allow scientists to expose experiments to the vacuum and elements of space.

Once this work was completed, Walheim and Love examined a damaged handrail on the outside of the station’s Quest airlock. They used an improvised tool covered with spacewalk overglove material to rub the area to see if it could be the source of some glove abrasions that have been noticed on recent activity outside the station. Mission managers in Houston will discuss the results to determine if the area is indeed the source of the issue.

Tomorrow at 6:17 a.m., the shuttle will fire its propulsion system for 31 minutes and 13 seconds in order to re-boost the orbit of the ISS. This will allow the station to achieve the proper alignment needed in advance of next month’s arrival of Endeavour on the STS-123 mission.

A crew news conference is scheduled for 7:40 a.m. tomorrow, with all 10 crew members participating in a question-and-answer session with media from the United States and Europe.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued after crew wake-up tomorrow morning, which is scheduled for 1:45 a.m.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #17

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#18    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:14 AM


02.16.08
Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 6 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-18


STS-122 MCC Status Report #18


HOUSTON – The 10 crew members aboard the International Space Station/space shuttle Atlantis complex today will continue with the outfitting of the new Columbus research module, give the station a reboost to get it ready for its next visitors and spend some time talking with reporters on Earth.

The crew was allowed to sleep in about 30 minutes after Friday’s long spacewalk. This morning's wake-up call – “I Believe I Can Fly,” performed by Yolanda Adams and Kenny G and played for Mission Specialist Leland Melvin – came at 2:20 a.m. CST.

Columbus outfitting and transfer operations will continue throughout the day, and the crew will be reconfiguring the tools and suits used during Friday’s spacewalk.

At 6:16 a.m., the shuttle will fire its propulsion system for 36 minutes to reboost the orbit of the space station. This will allow the station to achieve the proper alignment needed in advance of next month’s arrival of Endeavour on the STS-123 mission.

And then at 7:40 a.m., all 10 members of the shuttle and station crews will participate in the traditional joint crew news conference. Reporters at Johnson Space Center in Texas, Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the European Space Agency's European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, and the French Space Agency Headquarters in Paris will be participating in the question-and-answer session.

Toward the end of the day, Pilot Alan Poindexter and mission specialists Rex Walheim and Stanley Love will have some off-duty time. Walheim and Love performed Friday’s spacewalk, and Poindexter worked inside as their intravehicular officer.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued this afternoon or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #18

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#19    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:16 AM

02.16.08
Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 1 p.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-19


STS-122 MCC Status Report #19


HOUSTON – Outfitting of the International Space Station Columbus module experiment racks continued today with all 10 crew members working to complete the activation and initialization of the newest addition to the station.

Earlier in the day, space shuttle Atlantis’ propulsion system was used to reboost the station’s altitude by about 1.4 miles (2.2 kilometers) – the first reboost of the station using shuttle thrusters since 2002.

The altitude adjustment lasted 36 minutes and used four of the shuttle’s vernier jets that produced about 28 pounds of thrust each to gently raise the orbit. The increased altitude will allow the station to be in the proper orbit for next month’s arrival of Endeavour on the STS-123 mission.

Early Saturday, all 10 members of the shuttle and station crews held their traditional news conference with media in the United States and Europe. Today set the stage for the final transfer of cargo between the shuttle and station early on Sunday. The crews will bid farewell to one another and close the hatches between the shuttle and station shortly after 11 a.m. Sunday. Atlantis’ departure remains scheduled for early Monday.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued tomorrow morning after crew wake-up or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #19

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#20    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 12:48 PM

02.17.08
Sunday, February 17, 2008 - 1:15 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-20


STS-122 MCC Status Report #20


HOUSTON – The seven-member crew of Atlantis will complete the final cargo transfers, wrap up their part in the installation and activation of the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory, and then bid farewell to the Expedition 16 crew this morning.

Farewells are scheduled to begin at 11:15 a.m., followed by hatch closing at 11:30 a.m.

The wakeup call for the crew’s final docked day came at 12:45 a.m. Mission Specialist Stan Love was treated with “Hail Thee, Harvey Mudd,” the Harvey Mudd College anthem written by Amy Lewkowicz. Love is a 1987 graduate of the Claremont, Calif., private math, science and engineering college.

Overnight Atlantis’ transferred 92 pounds of oxygen to the station’s Quest airlock tank. In addition, a final leak check of the vestibule between the Harmony and Columbus modules was done.

The most important transfer completed is the return of astronaut Dan Tani. Tani, who joined the station’s Expedition 16 crew in October, is being replaced by European Space Agency Astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who arrived at the station with the STS-122 crew. Eyharts will finish commissioning Columbus.

In addition to delivering the Columbus laboratory to the orbital outpost, Atlantis’ astronauts performed three spacewalks to prepare the module for its scientific work, replaced an expended nitrogen tank on the station and retrieved a failed control moment gyroscope for return to Earth.

Atlantis’ crew is scheduled to leave the space station on Monday, with undocking slated for 3:26 a.m. that day.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued this afternoon after the mission status briefing or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #20

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#21    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:10 PM

02.17.08
Sunday, February 17, 2008 - 1p.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-21


STS-122 MCC Status Report #21


HOUSTON – The ten spaceflight crew members parted ways to their respective spacecraft today. After farewells were said, hatches between the space shuttle Atlantis and International Space Station were closed at 12:03 p.m. CST.

Atlantis’ crew is scheduled to leave the space station on Monday, with undocking slated for 3:27 a.m. The departure sets up Atlantis for its scheduled landing at the Kennedy Space Center, Wednesday at 8:07 a.m.

Before closing hatches, the seven-member crew of Atlantis completed the final cargo transfers between the two spacecraft. Atlantis launched with one of heaviest middecks in the history of the shuttle program and will land with the heaviest middeck ever, weighing 2,040 pounds.

The most important transfer completed is the exchange of astronaut Daniel Tani for European Space Agency Astronaut Leopold Eyharts. Tani joined the station’s Expedition 16 crew in October and is being replaced by Eyharts, who arrived at the station with the STS-122 crew. Eyharts will finish commissioning the Columbus laboratory.

In addition to delivering Columbus to the orbital outpost, Atlantis’ astronauts performed three spacewalks to prepare the module for its scientific work, replaced an expended nitrogen tank on the station and retrieved a failed control moment gyroscope for return to Earth.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued Monday morning or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #21

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#22    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 10:44 PM

02.18.08
Monday, February 18, 2008 - 12:45 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-22


STS-122 MCC Status Report #22


HOUSTON – Space shuttle Atlantis is set to undock from the International Space Station at 3:27 a.m. after nine days of joint operations carrying the seven-member crew that successfully commissioned the European Space Agency’s new Columbus science laboratory.

Today’s wake-up song, played for STS-122 crew member Dan Tani, at 11:53 p.m. was “Over the Rainbow/What a Wonderful World,” sung by Hawaiian-Japanese vocalist Israel Kamakawiwo'ole, accompanied by his ukulele.

With their delivery of the new laboratory, Atlantis' STS-122 astronauts will leave a larger space station and one with increased science capabilities. The Columbus Research Module adds nearly 1,000 cubic feet of habitable volume and affords room for 10 experiment racks, each an independent science lab.

Atlantis also left behind new Expedition 16 crew member Leopold Eyharts, 95 pounds of oxygen and nearly 1,400 pounds of water.

After undocking, Atlantis will move in front of the station to a range of 400 feet, and then Pilot Alan Poindexter will begin a full one lap fly around so his crewmates can get video and digital still imagery of Columbus docked to Harmony’s right-side port.

When the shuttle again crosses directly in front of the station, Poindexter will fire the reaction control system jets to begin Atlantis’ separation. He’ll make the final separation jet firing at 5:10 a.m. to start the crew’s trip home.

The crew will conduct a final inspection of the shuttle’s thermal protection system using the Orbiter Boom Sensor System at 7:20 a.m. The crew will re-examine the reinforced carbon-carbon panels on both wings and the nose cap for any evidence of damage from orbital debris.

As the other crew members prepare for landing, Tani, who has been in space since his launch to the space station in October, is scheduled for exercise to help prepare his body to feel the pull of gravity again. Atlantis is targeted to land at the Kennedy Space Center Wednesday at 8:07 a.m.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued this evening or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #22

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#23    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 10:47 PM

02.18.08
Monday, February 18, 2008 - 11 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-23


STS-122 MCC Status Report #23


Space shuttle Atlantis undocked from the International Space Station at 3:24 a.m. CST after nine days of joint operations.

Atlantis and the seven-member crew left behind the station’s new European Space Agency (ESA) Columbus laboratory and ESA astronaut Leopold Eyharts to prepare science experiments inside for operation.

After undocking, Atlantis Pilot Alan Poindexter completed a full fly around so his crewmates could obtain video and digital still imagery of Columbus docked to Harmony’s right-side port.

The crew is performing a final inspection of the shuttle’s thermal protection system in preparation for return to Earth. The Orbiter Boom Sensor System is used to search for any evidence of damage from orbital debris. That data will be reviewed by engineers over the next day.

Astronaut Daniel Tani, who has been in space since his launch to the space station in October, exercised to help prepare his body to feel the pull of gravity again.

Atlantis is targeted to land at the Kennedy Space Center Wednesday at 8:07 a.m. The weather forecast is favorable.

Today the crew is scheduled to go to sleep at 3:45 p.m. and awaken at 11:45 p.m.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued Tuesday morning or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #23

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#24    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 07:41 PM

02.19.08
Tuesday, February 19, 2008 - 2 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-24


STS-122 MCC Status Report #24


Atlantis’ seven-member crew will complete the final preparations today for their return home, wrapping up their 13-day mission with a scheduled early Wednesday morning landing at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The crew’s 11:45 p.m. CST Monday wake-up call was the Spamalot rendition of “Always Look on the Bright Side” played for STS-122 Commander Steve Frick.

The crew is expected to begin routine de-orbit preparations and cabin stowage at 2:45 a.m. Then, at 4:10 a.m., Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialist Rex Walheim will power up an auxiliary power unit to check out the orbiter’s flight control surfaces. At 5:20 a.m. they will start a test firing of each of the shuttle’s reaction control system jets.

Late Monday afternoon, the heaters on Atlantis’ four aft vernier engines, part of the reaction control system, failed. Those jets, located near the Orbiter Maneuvering System pods, are the small attitude control jets used to tweak a shuttle’s position in orbit and are not used during de-orbit maneuvers.

The shuttle astronauts will take a break from packing at 7:35 a.m. to talk about the flight with ABC News, CNN and WRIC-TV in Richmond, Va., near the home of Mission Specialist Leland Melvin.

At 12:15 p.m. Walheim and returning Expedition 16 Flight Engineer Dan Tani will set up a recumbent seat on the middeck for Tani to use during entry and landing. Melvin and Mission Specialist Hans Schlegel will stow the Ku-band communications antenna at 12:35 p.m.

The International Space Station’s crew is enjoying a day off-duty before starting a heavy schedule. They are preparing for the delivery of the first section of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s Kibo laboratory and the Canadian Space Agency’s multi-armed dexterous robotic system, Dextre, on the STS-123 mission targeted for launch March 11.

Atlantis is scheduled to land at the Kennedy Space Center Wednesday at 8:07 a.m. The weather forecast is favorable. Today the crew is scheduled to go to sleep at 3:45 p.m. and awaken at 11:45 p.m.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued this afternoon or earlier if events warrant.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #24

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#25    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 04:47 AM

02.19.08
Tuesday, February 19, 2008 - 5 p.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-25


STS-122 MCC Status Report #25


HOUSTON – After a check of all of the systems they will use for a return to Earth, Atlantis’ seven-member crew packed up today in preparation for landing Wednesday.

Atlantis is planned to land at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 8:07 a.m. CST with the forecast of near perfect weather at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The shuttle would fire its engines to begin a descent to Florida at 7 a.m.

Atlantis has three additional opportunities to land Wednesday if needed. A second opportunity to land in Florida would begin with an engine firing at 8:35 a.m. leading to touchdown at 9:42 a.m.

Opportunities also are available to land at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The first opportunity to land at Edwards would begin with an engine firing at 10:05 a.m. leading to an 11:12 a.m. touchdown. A second opportunity to land in California would begin with an engine firing at 11:41 a.m. leading to a 12:47 p.m. touchdown.

Atlantis crew – Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Stan Love, Hans Schlegel and Dan Tani – began a sleep period at 3:45 p.m. and will awaken at 11:45 p.m. Tani is returning home after a four-month stay aboard the International Space Station.

The next STS-122 status report will be issued Wednesday morning.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #25

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#26    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 01:03 PM

02.20.08
Wednesday, February 20, 2008 - 1 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-26


STS-122 MCC Status Report #26


HOUSTON – The seven astronauts on space shuttle Atlantis are only hours away from a landing in Florida that will conclude a successful 13-day mission that delivered the European Space Agency’s science laboratory Columbus to the International Space Station. The wakeup song, “Hail to the Spirit of Liberty” by John Philip Sousa, was played at 11:55 p.m. Tuesday for Pilot Alan Poindexter. Deorbit preparations begin at 3:05 a.m. Then the crew will ready their seats and should get the okay to close the payload bay doors at 4:19 a.m. If the near perfect weather continues, Commander Steve Frick will conduct the deorbit burn at 6:59 a.m. That will slow Atlantis enough to fall out of orbit to begin its descent toward a landing at the Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility at 8:07 a.m. Atlantis has three additional opportunities to land today if needed. A second opportunity to land in Florida would begin with an engine firing at 8:35 a.m. leading to touchdown at 9:42 a.m. Opportunities also are available to land at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. The first opportunity to land at Edwards would begin with an engine firing at 10:05 a.m. leading to an 11:12 a.m. touchdown. A second opportunity to land in California would begin with an engine firing at 11:41 a.m. leading to a 12:47 p.m. touchdown. Atlantis’ crew – Commander Steve Fricke, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Stan Love, Hans Schlegel and Dan Tani – installed Columbus Feb. 11 and conducted three spacewalks to prepare the lab for its scientific work. They also replaced an expended nitrogen tank on the station’s P1 truss and retrieved a failed control moment gyroscope for return to Earth. The next STS-122 status report will be issued following landing.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #26

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#27    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 04:34 PM

02.20.08
Wednesday, February 20, 2008 - 9 a.m. CST
Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas

  
STATUS REPORT: STS-122-27


STS-122 MCC Status Report #27


Space shuttle Atlantis and its seven-member crew landed on Runway 15 at the Kennedy Space Center at 8:07 a.m. CST today, completing a 13-day journey of more than 5,296,842 miles. Atlantis touched down at exactly 8:07:10 a.m. with the nose gear touching down at 8:07:20 a.m. Wheels stop occurred at 8:08:08 a.m.

During 202 orbits of Earth, the crew of Atlantis, which includes Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Hans Schlegel, Stan Love and Dan Tani, installed the European Space Agency’s Columbus laboratory on the International Space Station. Columbus, Europe’s largest contribution to the station, adds more than 2,600 cubic feet to the station and a wide variety of experiments and research.

The astronauts conducted three spacewalks to install and set up Columbus. They also removed a spent nitrogen tank assembly and a failed gyroscope, both of which were returned to Earth. During the final spacewalk, the astronauts examined an area outside of the station’s air lock, where a small divot was discovered. The astronauts used an improvised tool comprising some material from an unused overglove to see if this area could be causing cuts and abrasions on the astronauts’ gloves. Engineers in Houston will examine the results.

Atlantis delivered European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts to the station, replacing Tani as a flight engineer aboard the complex. Tani spent 107 days in space as a resident of the station. He launched on Oct. 23, 2007, aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-120 mission.

Atlantis will be towed to its orbiter processing facility this afternoon, where it will begin preparations for its next mission, STS-125, which is targeted to launch Aug. 28 to service the Hubble Space Telescope for the final time.

As Atlantis landed, the astronauts saw out their left window space shuttle Endeavour standing ready at launch pad 39-A. Endeavour’s launch on mission STS-123 is scheduled for March 11. The crew of Atlantis is scheduled to return to Houston on Thursday. An arrival ceremony is planned for about 4 p.m. at NASA Hangar 276 at Ellington Field.

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Source: NASA - STS-122 MCC Status Report #27

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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