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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


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#2491    Abramelin

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:23 PM

The next old post is a reminder of that list of several Germanic tribes that ended up (or may have ended up) in Ireland, Scotland and England, tribes of whom we hear nothing of in the OLB, but who - as I said before - may have moved there because of the floods of around 360 BCE that hit the coasts of the Low Lands as mentioned by the Frisian historiographer Schotanus (or the 306 BCE flood from the OLB).

Add to that that the "Fresen" were known in Irish legends, plus that a British 19th century writer thought that the Gaelic "Lochlan" was nothing else but these low lands between Rhine and Weser. And add to that again that - at least according to one source -  the Irish "Land below the Seas" was these flooded areas of the "Low Lands" (in case of confusion, read the entry about the Irish in my OLB blog - see signature)


View PostAbramelin, on 17 September 2012 - 04:48 PM, said:

Menapii: a Germanic tribe living to the south west of the Frisii; spoke a language closely related to Frisian as we can see by the Lord's Prayer in the Menapian language in Overwijn's book about the OLB; probably moved to Ireland;

Chauci: a Germanic tribe to the east of the Frisians; were very civilized according to Tacitus and were being decribed almost like the OLB describes the Fryans; but they were also sea raiders and often hooked up with the Frisians; linguistic indications they went raiding and settling as far as Iberia ("Kaukaioi"); probably moved to Ireland too and were there the neighbours of the Menapii;

Parisi: a Celtic/Germanic (?) tribe living near the Seine; some say their name means Frisii; probably moved to Yorkshire, England. The Parisi in England had a different culture from the surrounding tribes (and in England their name is also explained as "of the wetlands, low pastures", "herdsmen", "commanders");

Belgae: a group of Celtic/Germanic (?) tribes living in present day Belgium and Northern France; probably they were the Fir Bolg of the Irish legends; the Parisi were probably one of them (??);

Taexali: a group of very probably Frisian settlers (lived near a bay in Scotland that was once called Frisian Bay); did they come from Texel (old name Texla) after the flood in 360 or 350 BC, a flood mentioned by the Frisian historiographer Schotanus? Same could be true for the aforementioned tribes. Some of their hillforts were called "Laws" (think OLB citadel on Texland; the etymology of Texla is based on a Germanic word for direction, "to the right". But 'right' has also another meaning aside from a direction...);

Firaesi: a tribe living in Scandia which was an island according to Ptolemy but was actually the southern part of Sweden:

The Firaesi (Latinization) or Phiraisoi (original Greek) are a people listed in Ptolemy’s Geography (2.10).

Ptolemy’s view of the region is not very precise, but he places them on the east side of what he believed to be an island, Scandia. The presence of the Goutai, or Goths, in the center, identifies Scandia fairly certainly as the southern portion of the Scandinavian peninsula. As to whether the east of it was the east coast of Sweden or the coast of Finland opposite, the latter is perhaps too remote for detailed knowledge by Ptolemy or his sources.

There is in fact a possible Germanic derivation of Phiraisoi. They are in the same region as the Favonae, who may have been residents of Småland. Old Norse and Old Icelandic firar, Old English firas, are fairly close to Firaesi and mean “men, human beings” or “Volk” in German. As it happens, Uppland was traditionally divived in Folkland, four provinces, which lost their jurisdictional importance in 1296.

Koebler’s Old Norse Etymological Database in the Indo-European Etymological Database online at Leiden University gives a Proto-Indo-European root of *perkwus, becoming Germanic *ferhwioz by Grimm's Law. The root meaning is “oak”, but the oak was regarded as a symbol of hardness, toughness and strength (see also Harudes).

With regard to people it means “life force” or especially “power”, in the sense of the collective power of the folk. It would be a descriptive epithet of the *teuta-, “tribe, people”. This connotation is probably not devoid of a military sense, as the root went into Hittite, a very early branch of Indo-European, as “army”. Uppland then would have been a densely populated and at the time fairly conservative remnant of Indo-European culture. If the Indo-European penetration of Europe can be regarded as a very slow invasion, its Schwerpunkt, or “heavy point”, came to rest in Uppland.

The Firaesi are not mentioned elsewhere in history, perhaps because of language changes and the preference of folk for firar. More information is undoubtedly to be gleaned from archaeology.


Firaesi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Posted Image Firaesi


According to accepted history, the Frisians originally came from the area of Denmark and Southern Sweden (around 1700 BC they went on the move). Does their name mean "men, folk, human beings, the people"? Also think about the Irish "Fir" which means the same...

Old Prussians: a Baltic tribe, aka "Aesti" according to Tactitus. Lived in an area near the "Friesisches Haff", Poland; spoke a language called "Pruteni" which was, again according to Tacitus, the same language as spoken in Brittain by the "Pretani". Now Google "Pruteni", and see where you end up, lol. Yes, Rutheni, Russ..

I once fabricated an original name for the Proto Frisians, "Phruisii", and suggested that from that name the others developed: Frisii, Fireasi, Prusi, Parisi (and there are those who'd like to add: Farsi or Parsi..).





And today I found this:

The Rise of the Celts - Henri Hubert

http://books.google....e Rhine&f=false

Posted Image

Never heard of these sources before, but it sort of proves my point.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 17 February 2013 - 04:43 PM.


#2492    Abramelin

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:36 PM

An old Celtic name for the North Sea is "Morimarusa", and is always said to mean "Dead Sea". This is then explained by saying that lots of river water can settle on the heavier salt sea water by which it calms down the waves, or make the sea appear 'dead'.

But if you consider my former post, it could simply mean "Sea of the Dead" or something, because of its many catastrophical floods that forced the surviving tribes to go on the move.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 17 February 2013 - 04:41 PM.


#2493    Abramelin

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 05:25 PM

I have called Overwijn's ideas, expressed in his book about the OLB - 1941/1951 - as 'somewhat' far out. And that's because his book was heavily influenced by Blavatsky's cooked up fantasies.

He was also influenced by Velikovsky's ideas, but to a much lesser degree. I have to look it up, but as far as I remember Overwijn did not use Velikovsky's extreme idea about planet Jupiter 'giving birth' to planet Venus around 3000 BCE and thereby causing all kinds of global disasters when it settled in its current orbit. If that had really happened, I think (but I am no astro-physicist) that all that would be left of our solar system would be the Sun and the gaseous planets, plus a newly formed huge asteroid belt and we would not be here discussing the OLB.

On the other hand, Overwijn did his best to use the Celtic languages to explain (much of) the OLB language/words. Considering what I posted just before, he may even have had a point there.



.

Edited by Abramelin, 17 February 2013 - 05:28 PM.


#2494    Abramelin

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 05:16 PM

Now this is more like it:


Dartmoor burial site gives up its 4,000-year-old secrets

An archaeological find on Dartmoor is exciting academics from around the world – Martin Hesp has been finding out why the 4,500-year-old remains have been given international importance.

When archaeologists unearthed the contents of a tomb in a remote part of Dartmoor 18 months ago they had no idea they were about to find an internationally important treasure trove.

But that is what the damp dank contents turned out to be. Now academics from all over the country and abroad are taking a big interest in what came out of the prehistoric cremation burial chamber from the lonesome heights of Whitehorse Hill.

The remarkably well-preserved items found inside are allowing historians one of the best glimpses of life in Southern England over 4,000 years ago that they’ve ever had.

The 18-month story from discovery to academic analysis is the subject of a BBC television programme being aired tonight – but the Western Morning News can reveal that the early Bronze Age organic remains and artefacts include prehistoric jewellery and finely executed tailoring.

What’s perhaps most remarkable of all is that the find included beads made of amber – a substance that doesn’t occur within 1,000 miles of Dartmoor.

[...]

Another feature of the cist’s contents might not excite a layman, but paleo-archaeologists from several countries have been fascinated by some layers of volcanic ash which were found.

“We know there was some volcanic activity back then, perhaps from Mount Hekla (in Iceland) – so all the geographers and climate change people are excited,” said Mrs Marchand. “It’s the first time we’ve found evidence of this on Dartmoor and it must have been pretty unpleasant to be out there at the time.”

http://archaeologyne...p-its-4000.html

Over 4000 years old, and then 4500 years old... what is it?

Amber hints at contact with the eastern North Sea

And they found proof of an active volcano .... of around 2200 BCE??


#2495    Abramelin

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 07:12 PM

Here's what appears to be the original article, plus video:


Samantha Smith looks at what has been called the most significant historical find ever on Dartmoor - the discovery of an internationally important prehistoric burial site.

The 4,000-year-old remains of the Bronze Age grave or cist, which were found in a peat bog, are set to rewrite the history books.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...ngland-21445658

Does anyone have more (detailed) info about this find?

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 February 2013 - 07:20 PM.


#2496    Abramelin

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 08:19 PM

Bronze Age: 2300 - 900 BC in Central Europe / Nordic Bronze Age 1800 - 500 BC
2300 BC marks the approximate beginning of the Unetice Culture (emerging out of the
Beaker folk group) found on both sides of the Elbe River to the Baltic Sea in what is
today the Czech Republic, Western Poland and Germany. It represents a fusion of the
Corded Ware and Beaker traditions and are considered by many to be proto – Celtic.


--

In Conclusion: The Cimbrians, at least as far back as the latter part of the 2nd Century
BC, but with persuasive evidence for a much earlier date (6th Century), resided in what is
today Himmerland County, Jutland, Denmark. Some ultimately settled in the Vestfold
area of Southeast Norway and perhaps Hordaland. The writings of Classical Greek and
Roman authors make it clear despite their location in the Germanic north, they spoke a
Celtic language related to Gaulish P-Celt, originated in the Celtic lands between Gaul and
Moravia with prongs in Jutland as well as both sides of the Alps, and had a culture that
was overwhelmingly Celtic.
Their Celtic affiliation lasted until some time between the
3rd and 5th Centuries AD when they lost their tribal identity subsequent to emigrating to
England during either Anglian or Viking times. Archaeological data confirms that their
culture was Celtic, with some of the most impressive Celtic finds in Europe coming from
Jutland and Fyn
.

http://www.davidkfau...-Chronology.pdf


Shouldn't what I underlined not be something like"proto-Frisian" or "Fryan, or a Germanic language?

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 February 2013 - 08:22 PM.


#2497    Abramelin

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 08:56 PM

A 'bit' more:


Origins of the Cimbri – German or Celt?:

Before delving into the topic in any depth it is
essential to clear up one matter which seems to have created the largest swirl of
controversy – were the Cimbri Germans, or were they Celts? Since they resided in the
heart of the northern Germanic, southern Scandinavian region the answer should be
obvious, however what seems apparent may only be an illusion.


-

In 1877 Rawlinson wrote a very
well researched monograph entitled, “On the Ethnography of the Cimbri” which was
presented to the Anthropological Institute. He specifically acknowledged that there were
two theories of origins – Germanic and Celtic. He outlines the essentials of each, and
provides 6 lines of evidence (e.g., their manner of making war; the documented
participation of their women in battle) that point strongly to the Cimbri being Celtic. He
believes that some of the opinions in favor of a German origin come from prejudices of
Germans who would rather believe that the famous Cimbri (who lived among Germanic
people) were culturally and biologically German.


It appears that there is resistance shown by some modern writers to believing that there
could be a large Celtic enclave among the Germanics. In atlases of the Celts not one
chooses to put an “inconvenient” blotch of color on the Jutland Peninsula far removed
from the Celtic homeland – yet have no difficulty in circumscribing a region in modern
Turkey (Galatia) where three Celtic outlier tribes of the Iron Age are placed. An example
is Konstam (2003) in his “Historical Atlas of the Celtic World”. On page 26 he calls the
Cimbri “a proto-Celtic culture” and in the rest of the book calls them “Germanic”.
On
the map of migrations in the chapter “Celtic Origins” he shows an arrow from the proto -
Celtic territory circa 1000 BC heading north to the tip of the Jutland Peninsula and labels
this, “Slav – German Migrations”. Some recent authors, via maps included with the text
,
appear to acknowledge the migration of Alpine peoples to Denmark in La Tene Celtic
times (e.g., 500 BC). However they appear reticent to explain the northward pointing
arrows. An example is the monumental work, “The Celtic World” edited by Green
(1995) with an arrow (unexplained) from the La Tene Celtic territory to Northern Jutland
(p. xxiv). A very interesting exception to the general reticence noted above is a map in
the comprehensive (more than 100 authors) companion book (edited by Moscati et al)
relating to the all – Europe exhibition entitled “The Celts”, held in Venice in 1991. Here,
under “The Era of the Oppida: Second-First Century B.C.”, the map shows sites clustered
across Europe from the Balkans in the east to the Bay of Biscay in the west, but with
nothing north of mid Germany – except Gunderstrup and Dejbjerg in Northern Denmark,
and Rynkeby on the Island of Fyn (Funnen) in Denmark (pp.420-421). Latham (1844)
wrote, the supposed presence of Kelts in the Cimbric Chersonesus [Jutland] has
complicated more than one question in ethnography (p. clix). It appears that the rationale
is that the Cimbri were in such an isolated pocket, so it is best to simply ignore their
Celtic origins - but ironically chapters on their migrations appear in most books
pertaining to the Celts
.


-

Herm (1976) goes to some length in an attempt to clear up the outstanding questions. He
interprets Strabo’s statements (see later for details) in light of the meaning of the word
“Germani” at the time it was used. The useage did not mean what it does today. Strabo
stated, "Thus I imagine that the Romans who lived in Gaul called them ‘Germani’ because
they want to indicate that they were the ‘authentic’
", the real Celts. Germani means in
their language ‘genuine’ in the sense of ‘original’
. Herm concludes, the Cimbri were the
very heart of that family. They were the most Celtic of the Celts (p. 67).


-

Peter Berresford Ellis, in “The Celtic Empire” (1990), reviewed the
available evidence and came to the following conclusion. The contemporary evidence,
however, seems clear enough. The Cimbri and the Teutones spoke Celtic, had Celtic
names and used Celtic weapons. The very names of the two tribes were Celtic. They
were, then, Celts. And, eventually, they formed alliances with other Celtic tribes,
creating a large Celtic army which, once more, nearly brought about the downfall of
Rome (p.121).


Hence it is concluded that the original or early Cimbri were both culturally (at least at one
time) and genetically a Celtic isolate within a sea of Germanic and Scandinavian people.
Hence they were more similar genetically to the La Tene Celts of Switzerland and tribes
such as the Helvetii. They may have born scant resemblance to the Germanic Danes
who, circa 500 AD, apparently absorbed the Jutland Peninsula into their territory with the
result being that the Cimbri lost their ethnic – tribal identity and became an apparently
indistinguishable part of the Danish fabric (see below for a more detailed analysis).
The Language of the Cimbri: That the Cimbri spoke a Celtic language is attested to by
the reports of Pliny the Elder (circa 77 AD) who stated that Philemon wrote that, the
Cimbris word Morimarusa means the Dead Sea, as far as the Promentory of Rubeas,
beyond which they name it the Cronian Sea (“Naturalis Historiae”, Libri IV, xiii, line
95).


-


Other evidence as to the language spoken by the Cimbri can be seen in the
actions of the Roman intelligence service of Marius, run by Sertorius, which sent spies
who spoke Gaulish Celtic into the Cimbri camp in 101 BC. They were able to
understand the language of the Cimbri so they could report back details of importance to
their masters (Hubert, 1934).


The meaning of the name Cimbri, according to some sources, derives from kimme (rim)
and thus “people of the coast”. As will be described later, some consider that Cimbri =
Cimmeri (the Cimmerians being an ancient people who “disappeared” from Western Asia
about 800 BC). There is a 600 or so year gap between the historical documentation
relating to each, time enough for dialect changes although linguists view as likely Cimbri
changing to Cimmeri rather than the other way around via Grimm’s law with mb
morphing to mm (Markale, 1976). Furthermore, there are different variants of Celtic,
other than Q-Celt (e.g., Irish) and P-Celt (e.g., Welsh and Gaulish).


Those knowledgeable about the language(s) such as reported in the Encyclopedia Britannica
1911 state that what is found as an mm sound in Welsh would be mb in other forms of
Celtic so that in Welsh “cymmer” is equivalent to “combor” in Old Irish (the latter on a
time scale being an earlier version of Celtic) and means “confluence of brooks”. Some
sources note that the Welsh term for themselves is Cymri that in Brythonic (P-Celt)
means, “companions” or “tribesmen”. One expert offers an opinion that Cimbri might
relate to Kom-roghes, which in General Celtic signifies, "the fellow countrypeople"
(Gavin-Hauser, personal communication, 2007). This would perhaps relate to their status
as kin to the Teutones who resided near them, were their allies in the famous campaign of
113 to 101 BC, and whose name means “the people” in all Celtic languages.



http://www.davidkfau...-Chronology.pdf


Cimbri:
a Germanic or Celtic people, supposed to have originated in Jutland, who invaded Gaul and northern Italy, and were destroyed by the Romans in 101 b.c.
(And that was after the Romans got beaten major several times by these same Cimbri)


http://dictionary.re...m/browse/cimbri

http://www.unrv.com/...bri-teutons.php



So these ancient Fryans spoke a Celtic language??

But that is not the impression I got from reading the OLB....


.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 February 2013 - 09:11 PM.


#2498    Abramelin

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:07 PM

These "Germanic" (or ancient Frisian or "Fryan") speaking people seem to have adapted quite well to their Gaelic neigbours when they settled in Ireland and Scotland:


We have illustration here of the fact that the Fenians
were not confined to Erin. In this ancient poem on the
battle of Gabhra we read of the bands of the Feinn of
Alban — Alban being the old name of Scotland, north of the
Firth of Forth and Clyde — and the supreme King of
Breatan — Breatan being southern Scotland, of which Dun-
breaton, now Dunbarton, was the chief seat — belonging to
the Order of the Feinne of Alban ; and also that the Fians
of Lochlan were powerful. Now, Lochlan was an ancient
name for Germany north of the Rhine
; but when the Nor-
wegian and Danish pirates appeared in the ninth century
they were called Lochlanaels, and the name of Lochlan was
transferred to Norway and Denmark. It has been argued *
from this that the Fenians were not a militia of Gaels, but
that they were a distinct Celtic race, connected with the
only two races who are spoken of as having come in oldest
time from Lochlan, namely, the Tuatha de Danann and the
Cruithne. These are thought to have been some of the
Celts who preceded the Germanic peoples now occupyino-
the north German shore and Scandinavia. The Tuatha de

Danann (people of the Dan country) landed in Scotland,
and, approaching the headlands of the north-western shore,
gave to the country the name of Alban (Highland or Alp-
land, the words Alb and Alp being of one Celtic origin),

which, as Albion, became the first native name of the whole
island. The Tuatha de Danann passed, as tradition has
already told us, into Erin, and partly occupied the land
before the Milesian brothers came from Spain. The
Cruithne, whom some connect with the Picts, first landed
from Lochlan in Erin, and migrated thence to Alban. To
the bards, then, of these northern Celts, who had not
reached our shores by way of southern Europe, the Fenians
and their poets may have been allied most closely. The
traditions of the Cruithne, in describing their migrations,
even name as the mythic poet of their race one whom they
called " Huasein."


http://www02.us.arch...01morl_djvu.txt


Who were these Feinne ? To what age do they
belong ? Mr. Skene, our highest authority on all Celtic
matters, replies that they were one of those races which
came from Lochlan, and preceded the Milesian Scots,
both in Erin and in Alban. Lochlan is the most ancient
name of that part of North Germany which lies between
the mouths of the Rhine and the Elbe, before the name
was transferred to Scandinavia.
From that North
German sea-board came the earliest race that peopled
Ireland, and Alban or the Scottish Highlands. During
their occupation, Ireland and the north of Scotland
were regarded as one territory, and the population
passed freely from one island to the other at a time
'when race, not territory, was the great bond of asso-
ciation.'


http://www.archive.o...01shai_djvu.txt


The Romans sent Celtic speaking messengers to this "Germanic" tribe.

A tribe, the "Jutlanders" who had no problems at all talking with their "Germanic" Frisian/Fryan neighbours., well, that's according to te OLB.

How odd.


There are times I think I should start a new thread about the origin of the Scottish and Irish people....

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 February 2013 - 09:34 PM.


#2499    Abramelin

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:00 PM

I have mentioned the Nordwestblock theory in this thread already, but here's something new:


Although the language of the Belgae was replaced by Latin (the ancestor of modern French) in the wake of Caesar’s military campaigns, some modern linguists believe that this zone constituted a distinct Nordwestblock, perhaps with its own Belgian Indo-European language that was neither Celtic nor Germanic (but possibly related to both). More controversially, the linguist Theo Vennemann proposed a possible Vasconic (Basque) substrate in languages of Atlantic Europe, including languages of the Belgic sub-region [3].

[3] Most linguists have rejected Vennemann’s Vasconic substratum theory. However, genetic data support the possibility of gene flow from Basque-like populations along the Atlantic zone of Western Europe. See “Old Europes (Part Two)” at http://dnatribes.com...-2009-08-29.pdf. Although evidence of gene flow from Basque-like populations does not necessarily suggest a Basque-like language substrate, it supports the possibility of population contacts that potentially could have influenced local languages.

http://www.dnatribes...-2010-09-30.pdf

http://en.wikipedia....i/Nordwestblock


#2500    Apol

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:40 AM

Look what I found yesterday on page 200 in Fridtjof Nansen's book In Northern Mists – Arctic Exploration in Early Times, Vol. 2:

The Arabs of the West came in contact with the North through the Norman Vikings, whom they called Maǵûs (cf. p. 55), and who in the ninth century and later made several predatory expeditions to the Spanish Peninsula. Their first attack on the Moorish kingdom in Spain seems to have taken place in 844, when, amongst other things, they took and sacked Seville. After that expedition, an Arab writer tells us, friendly relations were established between the sultan of Spain, ‘Abd ar-Raḥmân II., and “the king of the Maǵûs,” and, according to an account in Abu’l-Khaṭṭâb ‘Omar Ibn Diḥya [183] (ob. circa 1235), the former is even said to have sent an [201] ambassador, al-Ġazâl, to the latter’s country. Ibn Diḥya says that he took the account from an author named Tammâm Ibn ‘Alqama (ob. 896), who again is said to have had it from al-Ġazâl’s own mouth. It is obviously untrustworthy, but may possibly have a historical kernel. The king of the Maǵûs had first sent an ambassador to ‘Abd ar-Raḥmân to sue for peace (?); and al-Ġazâl accompanied him home again, in a well-appointed ship of his own, to bring the answer and a present. They arrived first at an island on the borders of the land of the Maǵûs people.[184] From thence they went to the king, who lived on a great island in the ocean, where there were streams of water and gardens. It was three days’ journey or 300 [Arab] miles from the continent. “There was an innumerable multitude of the Maǵûs, and in the vicinity were many other islands, great and small, all inhabited by Maǵûs, and the part of the continent that lies near them also belongs to them, for a distance of many days’ journey. They were then heathens (Maǵûs); now they are Christians, for they have abandoned their old religion of fire-worship,[185] only the inhabitants of certain islands have retained it. There the people still marry their mothers or sisters, and other abominations are also committed there [cf. Strabo on the Irish, vol. i. p. 81]. With these the others are in a state of war, and they carry them away into slavery.”

183. Cf. R. Dozy, 1881, pp. 267, ff.  
184. This island may have been Noirmoutier, in the country of the Normans of the Loire (according to A. Bugge).  
185. It is the name “Maǵûs,” from the Greek Μάγος (Magian, fire-worshipper, cf. p. 55), that led the author into this error. Maǵûs was used collectively of heathens in general, but especially of the Norse Vikings [cf. Dozy, 1881, ii. p. 271].

The book was published simultaneously in 1911 by William Heinemann, London, by Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York and by Arthur H. Clark Co., Glendale CA.
It was republished by Filiquarian Publishing, LLC, Minneapolis MN/Qontro Classic Books, Bel Air CA, in 2010; and by Ulan Press, New York, in 2011.

But I found it here:
www.gutenberg.org/files/40634/40634-h/40634-h.htm


#2501    Apol

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 06:00 AM

It's also worth mentioning that in the kinglist of the Younger Edda, like how Snorri Sturluson presents it in his prologue, is mentioned a Magi as one of Woden's (Odin's) predecessors. Magi was - together with Vidar, Vále and Mode - one of the survivors who gathered on the plain of Idavoll after Ragnarök.


#2502    Abramelin

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 06:35 AM

Lol,  Apol. that's the problem with a large thread like this: people will discover the same thing over and over again.

http://www.unexplain...=184645&st=6015

,

Edited by Abramelin, 25 February 2013 - 06:46 AM.


#2503    Knul

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 11:42 AM

View PostApol, on 25 February 2013 - 06:00 AM, said:

It's also worth mentioning that in the kinglist of the Younger Edda, like how Snorri Sturluson presents it in his prologue, is mentioned a Magi as one of Woden's (Odin's) predecessors. Magi was - together with Vidar, Vále and Mode - one of the survivors who gathered on the plain of Idavoll after Ragnarök.

This is extremely important, because it would mean that the name Magjari in the OLB has been badly chosen and has nothing to do with the Magyars or Hungary and that it would be just a title, something like king in the Northern countries.


#2504    Apol

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:51 PM

View PostKnul, on 25 February 2013 - 11:42 AM, said:

This is extremely important, because it would mean that the name Magjari in the OLB has been badly chosen and has nothing to do with the Magyars or Hungary and that it would be just a title, something like king in the Northern countries.

Yes, it was certainly a title - it appears as a title in the OLB also, as "the Magí" is mentioned across centuries. It must have been a lot of them in succession.

But I can't see, however, why this name should have been badly chosen - the Magíara was a ruling priestly caste. One part of it may have settled in Hungary as well as another one in Scandinavia.


#2505    Apol

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 12:56 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 25 February 2013 - 06:35 AM, said:

Lol,  Apol. that's the problem with a large thread like this: people will discover the same thing over and over again.

http://www.unexplain...=184645&st=6015

,

Yes, that's a problem - but you are solving it, as you have been here all the time and remember what has been posted, You're really a living library in that way.
The thread you have linked to is very interesting - I will study it thoroughly in the coming days. Thank you.





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