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Euthanasia-For or Against


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Poll: Euthanasia-For or Against (32 member(s) have cast votes)

euthanasia-for or against

  1. Yes I am for it (30 votes [93.75%])

    Percentage of vote: 93.75%

  2. No I am against it (2 votes [6.25%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.25%

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#16    Paranoid Android

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:44 AM

View Postpitchp, on 13 February 2013 - 01:39 AM, said:

Everyone should have a right to leave this world when they want to. If you are against it, you are against freedom
So a 40-year old mother with kids aged 3, 7, and 12, has the Right to commit suicide because of severe clinical depression but is otherwise completely healthy?  And bugger what her husband, kids, family, and friends think or say?

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#17    Paranoid Android

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:53 AM

That said and done, I personally have a moral objection to euthanasia. I feel life is sacred.  However, with that said, I acknowledge the pain and suffering some people go through and therefore if someone chose to end it I would not criticise them for that choice.

My main worry of euthanasia being legalised is the possible misuse in certain cases where death isn't warranted.  A person with Alzheimer's may not be suffering but they can be hard to take care of and so someone may try to convince such a person that the life they are living isn't really life at all and therefore consider euthanasia.  In good conscience I could not accept this as a valid reason for euthanasia.

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#18    Rlyeh

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:21 AM

View PostParanoid Android, on 13 February 2013 - 05:53 AM, said:

My main worry of euthanasia being legalised is the possible misuse in certain cases where death isn't warranted.  A person with Alzheimer's may not be suffering but they can be hard to take care of and so someone may try to convince such a person that the life they are living isn't really life at all and therefore consider euthanasia.  In good conscience I could not accept this as a valid reason for euthanasia.
If it was their wishes, I'd support their (hypothetical) right to euthanasia.

Edited by Rlyeh, 13 February 2013 - 06:24 AM.


#19    Professor Buzzkill

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:33 AM

View PostParanoid Android, on 13 February 2013 - 05:53 AM, said:

That said and done, I personally have a moral objection to euthanasia. I feel life is sacred.  However, with that said, I acknowledge the pain and suffering some people go through and therefore if someone chose to end it I would not criticise them for that choice.

My main worry of euthanasia being legalised is the possible misuse in certain cases where death isn't warranted.  A person with Alzheimer's may not be suffering but they can be hard to take care of and so someone may try to convince such a person that the life they are living isn't really life at all and therefore consider euthanasia.  In good conscience I could not accept this as a valid reason for euthanasia.

I doubt you could convince a doctor that Alzheimer's was a valad reason for euthanasia. In european countries where it is legal you need multiple doctors to agree before you can be granted the proceedure. Thats not to say that  people with Alzheimer's dont suffer.


#20    Beckys_Mom

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:14 PM

View Postpitchp, on 13 February 2013 - 01:39 AM, said:

Everyone should have a right to leave this world when they want to. If you are against it, you are against freedom

I agree...  If I fall seriously ill and in a lot of pain, I would hope for the doctors to do anything they can to help me, I would even want more medial opinions, because I would want the help.. BUT  If after all has failed, and every doctor confirmed that there is nothing more they can do for me, and I was suffering bad, knowing that there is no hope, I would not want my children to see my last days of me suffering. I would have myself pumped up on morphine so my kids don't see me in pain... Later I would demand I get put to sleep   I have already told this to my husband and he understands and feels the same way...  So if anyone here  doesn't agree, ( by the looks of it so far, all 2 of you )  that's too bad, because it's my life not yours..

Edited by Beckys_Mom, 13 February 2013 - 12:18 PM.

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#21    Timonthy

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:29 PM

View Postali smack, on 13 February 2013 - 03:38 AM, said:

What if someone wants to go on a killing spree and shoot themselves dead or blow themselves up in a suicide bombing? Is that an acceptable way to leave this world?
I disagree. I am not against freedom at all. I just think it could never be legal in the u.k. because of all the problems regarding it. for starters. If someone euthanises someone in a mercy killing. How are we to know that the said person wanted to die if there dead? anyone can forge wills, suicide notes etc.and claim to asked them to kill them. Another problem is the mental state of the person being euthanised. There are many suicidal people who sometimes feel like killing themselves but are persuaded not to, sometimes by themselves or sometimes friends etc. Now the problem is what happens if a mentally unstable person says they want to get euthanised but then sometime later they change there mind. But there dead so they can't change there mind. people should be encouraged to not kill themselves not to kill themselves.Another problem with it could very well cause  a slipperly slope, where people persuaded mentally retarded, frail or very ill people to die, thus causing more of these people to be euthanised. It would almost certainly be a disaster. Another problem is people are saying some on who smothers someone's face is not a killer because they were asked to. You then would have to let everyone else off who asked people to do bad stuff to them.
Refer to my post ;) Namely psychological assessment & legal contracts. As long as it was regulated properly there would be minimal misuse of the system.

Killing spree or suicide bombing is completely unrelated and has nothing to do with the topic...

Does this mean you're against turning off someones life support?

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#22    highdesert50

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

Unfortunately, we have upset natures way of expediting death where we would likely die from hypothermia, particularly so in a weakened state. "Living wills" and do-not-resuscitate (DNR) do allow one to forego treatment, but again, the process of death can be prolonged due to the controlled environment of the patient. One cannot expect medical care people to make the decision to terminate a patient which, in turn, would likely cause subsequent mental health issues for medical personnel. The decision needs to be that of the patient perhaps so as a provision to a living will.


#23    Hasina

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:26 PM

I'm for it. If a person wishes to die, who's to say they shouldn't? Only two things are sure in this life, death and taxes, and we can't control taxes, why not give us control over our own deaths, or give us the ability to hand off our death to others, like as a medical proxy.

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#24    ali smack

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:52 PM

View PostTimonthy, on 13 February 2013 - 12:29 PM, said:

Refer to my post ;) Namely psychological assessment & legal contracts. As long as it was regulated properly there would be minimal misuse of the system.

Killing spree or suicide bombing is completely unrelated and has nothing to do with the topic...

Does this mean you're against turning off someones life support?
I wasn't referring to your post and the killing spree etc is to do with this topic as the poster I was replying to said people have a right to leave this world anyway they want. So I am wondering does he agree with that? Because they choose to leave this world in a horrific and selfish way, taking many others with them.
To answer your question I don't agree with turning off life support because there's always a slim chance they may recover. In our society we as people should be focusing all our attention on prolonging life, on finding cures to diseases, on helping regrow body tissue and on eradicating disease. Which in all fairness a lot of scientists do. We shouldn't be encouraging people to take there lives.


#25    ali smack

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 02:00 PM

In due respect I am yet to find many  valid arguments for Euthanasia. None of the problems i've pointed out against Euthanasia, that even some pro-euthanasia supporters accept as problems have been debunked.
Another problem is a lot of people that have been killed in mercy killings are capable of doing it themselves which beggars the question, why get someone to do it for you? It could go horribly wrong and has done on a number of times.
The only time I can understand the case for ( And I still don't agree but can understand) Is Tony Nickelson. Because that poor chap couldn't move and of course could not kill himself.
So I can understand in  a case like him.


#26    Bonecrusher

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:07 PM

I've already made my feelings known about this on an other post.
I'm well for euthanisia as you well know.
Because it's sort of in a religious part I'll just say one thing.
I can imagine the right- wing preachers in the Deep South being against it.
I don't need to confer anywhere because it's the absolute truth.
They like anything that extends life despite how untenable it is.
What would one of these preachers do if there significant others were begging to die?
Would he or she condemn them to hell?
If they had a shred of decency they shouldn't abide by the Bible all the time.
Knowing them they would think they were condemning themselves for risking it.

Edited by Medium Brown, 13 February 2013 - 05:41 PM.

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#27    Goblin-5

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:54 PM

View Postali smack, on 13 February 2013 - 01:52 PM, said:

I don't agree with turning off life support because there's always a slim chance they may recover.

I just have one name to give you. Terri Schaivo.

View Postali smack, on 13 February 2013 - 01:52 PM, said:

In our society we as people should be focusing all our attention on prolonging life, on finding cures to diseases, on helping regrow body tissue and on eradicating disease. Which in all fairness a lot of scientists do. We shouldn't be encouraging people to take there lives.
Seems to me that you are scared of death. We already prolong life as it stands given that 70 is now seen as old and not an impossible age to achieve. The core question is who owns their life and who has the right to make a decision on when to end it?. The person? The State? The Church/temple/synagogue/mosque aka God? We may all have an inalienable "right" to life but do we also have a concommitant "right" to death?

Some argue that suicide is a sin and assisting a suicide is both sinful and an act of murder. I disagree with both arguments. Sin is a value judgement that is based on a limited moral code (Christian/monotheistic) which is oftimes contradictory. Sometimes suicide is lauded (in battle for example to save lives or achieve a goal) and the suicidee is posthumously lauded (VC, CMH). Other times a severely injured soldier is killed to alleviate suffering  and this may or may not be considered murder (depends on your country)
Everyone has the right to control their own body and if they are incapable of that due to disease or other physical ailment (stroke) then they should have the right to decide that they no longer wish to live. Who are we as outsiders to determine what another person should think? What values they should hold?


Edited by Goblin-5, 13 February 2013 - 08:54 PM.


#28    David Henson

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 01:25 AM

I voted for it. Just a little over a year ago my younger brother, who was only 41 years old, ended his battle with colon cancer. I think that towards the first year he would have ended it for himself but his wife and son wanted him to try and battle it to the end. That last year I watched him suffer a great deal, even with the powerful pain medication. And then he was gone. By that time he wanted very much for it to end. I don't think that I, or anyone else not in his position - in other words I don't think that anyone but him had that choice to make.

Due to the Church's position on the subject many people think that it is an unforgivable sin. It isn't. The Bible has cases of suicide. Then there is Enoch. Enoch was so unhappy because in his day he was surrounded by wicked, sinful people. He asked Jehovah God to end his life and He did. Many people say that Enoch went to heaven, but that isn't true. Jesus later said no man had gone to heaven except for himself. (Genesis 5:24 / John 3:13 / Hebrews 11:5, 13)

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#29    SpiritWalker7

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 01:36 AM

For.. If you have a right to life, you should have a right to leave that life.


#30    David Henson

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 01:44 AM

View Postali smack, on 13 February 2013 - 02:00 PM, said:

In due respect I am yet to find many  valid arguments for Euthanasia. None of the problems i've pointed out against Euthanasia, that even some pro-euthanasia supporters accept as problems have been debunked.
Another problem is a lot of people that have been killed in mercy killings are capable of doing it themselves which beggars the question, why get someone to do it for you? It could go horribly wrong and has done on a number of times.
The only time I can understand the case for ( And I still don't agree but can understand) Is Tony Nickelson. Because that poor chap couldn't move and of course could not kill himself.
So I can understand in  a case like him.

Fortunately it isn't for you to understand unless some day your fortune changes. I don't think it is up for debate. Its a personal choice.

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