Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * * 1 votes

Curiosity breaks rock to reveal dazzling


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 11,384 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:20 PM

"A rock crushed under the Curiosity Mars rover's wheels has dazzled mission scientists in more ways than one".

Mars is supposed to be the Red Planet, but the rock - dubbed "Tintina" - is a brilliant shade of white.

The unusual colour indicates the presence of hydrated minerals that formed when water flowed through the robot's landing site in ancient times.

Water-bearing minerals in Tintina and elsewhere add to the growing catalogue of water evidence at this location.

Rover team members have been presenting mission findings at the 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) in The Woodlands, Texas.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-21340279

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#2    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,755 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:31 PM

Images of this rock can be found in the "Missions to Mars" section of the UM image gallery: HERE.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#3    freetoroam

freetoroam

    Honourary member of the UM asylum

  • Member
  • 8,214 posts
  • Joined:11 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:rivers and canals of England and Wales.

  • If you didn't see it with your own eyes, or hear it with your own ears, don't invent it with your small mind and share it with your big mouth!

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:04 PM

We all know that water is crucial to life on Earth and this find is an indication that there may once been life on Mars, I hope that they find some more conclusive fossils in time, there must surely be some somewhere.

In an ideal World a law would be passed were NO guns were allowed and all those out there destroyed, trouble is the law makers are not going to take a risk of trying to pass that without making sure they are armed first.

#4    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,755 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:12 PM

View Postfreetoroam, on 19 March 2013 - 06:04 PM, said:

I hope that they find some more conclusive fossils in time, there must surely be some somewhere.
Why must there be?

Mars has been barren of water for billions of years. If life did evolve then it is unlikely to have progressed beyond simple life forms. Fossils of bacteria are not the easiest of things to find on Earth, never mind Mars, especially with a Rover not designed to look for them.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#5    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 11,384 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK. There if you need me

  • Never forget that only the weak fish swim with the stream, and a lie travels half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:14 PM

View Postfreetoroam, on 19 March 2013 - 06:04 PM, said:

We all know that water is crucial to life on Earth and this find is an indication that there may once been life on Mars, I hope that they find some more conclusive fossils in time, there must surely be some somewhere.

Yeh and I really really hope this rover, will be 'the one' to find some evidence of life, past or present. AND SOON!

But has anyone really thought what it will mean to them if they announced there had been life? Something perhaps more significant than microbial?  Fossils will be excellent to find I agree, but Id expect as on earth, you need to dig deep into the sedimentary layers to find some, or simply be incredibly lucky and find some exposed.

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is not that it ends so soon, but that we wait so long to begin it"

#6    bison

bison

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,640 posts
  • Joined:13 Apr 2011

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:38 PM

Microbial fossils on Mars could be like those recently found in the Pilbara region of Australia. Three and a half billion year old bacterial mats, communities of a great many individual organisms, left substantial sized traces in rocks. Due to a chain of geological circumstances, these rocks lie in easy view today. Such fossils, if they exist on Mars should be readily visible to Curiosity's hand lens magnifier.


#7    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,755 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 March 2013 - 11:03 PM

View Postseeder, on 19 March 2013 - 06:14 PM, said:

Yeh and I really really hope this rover, will be 'the one' to find some evidence of life, past or present. AND SOON!

This rover is not designed or equipped to look for life. It's mission was to discover if the conditions even existed in the past to support life. It has shown that they probably did. It will be up to later missions, possibly the joint ESA/Russian EXOMars missions, to look to see if life is still present.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#8    CRYSiiSx2

CRYSiiSx2

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan, USA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 11:12 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 19 March 2013 - 06:12 PM, said:

Why must there be?

Mars has been barren of water for billions of years. If life did evolve then it is unlikely to have progressed beyond simple life forms. Fossils of bacteria are not the easiest of things to find on Earth, never mind Mars, especially with a Rover not designed to look for them.

I think having a few rovers looking at very small regions of an entire planet isn't enough to say we know for sure the real past of Mars.  Hopefully something might be found some day, although I don't think that anything will ever be found on the surface.

Posted Image
NRA - PROTECT THE 2ND AMENDMENT
my twitter @sktm06

#9    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,755 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 19 March 2013 - 11:26 PM

View PostCRYSiiSx2, on 19 March 2013 - 11:12 PM, said:

I think having a few rovers looking at very small regions of an entire planet isn't enough to say we know for sure the real past of Mars.  Hopefully something might be found some day, although I don't think that anything will ever be found on the surface.

Which is why NASA don't have rovers wondering around aimlessly hoping to find something. The reality is that top geologists and planetary scientists spent years looking for a site most likely to show if conditions were suitable for life in the past, and as they have now shown unequivocally that fresh water did exist on the surface in the past it shows they did their job well.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#10    CRYSiiSx2

CRYSiiSx2

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
  • Joined:06 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Michigan, USA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 11:28 PM

View PostWaspie_Dwarf, on 19 March 2013 - 11:26 PM, said:

Which is why NASA don't have rovers wondering around aimlessly hoping to find something. The reality is that top geologists and planetary scientists spent years looking for a site most likely to show if conditions were suitable for life in the past, and as they have now shown unequivocally that fresh water did exist on the surface in the past it shows they did their job well.

True they do their job well, especially seeing from a satellite.

Posted Image
NRA - PROTECT THE 2ND AMENDMENT
my twitter @sktm06

#11    DONTEATUS

DONTEATUS

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 18,477 posts
  • Joined:15 Feb 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Planet TEXAS

Posted 20 March 2013 - 02:52 AM

Baby steps  comes to mind . :tu:

This is a Work in Progress!

#12    Merc14

Merc14

    anti-woo magician

  • Member
  • 6,625 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA

Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:51 PM

In a realtively short time Curiosity has pretty much achieved its primary objective of :

The overarching science goal of the mission is to assess whether

the landing area has ever had or still has environmental conditions

favorable to microbial life, both its habitability and its preservation.

Obviously Mars did have a water environment at one time in its past and life, as we know it, could have existed.    Congrats NASA and JPL.  I hope they solve the computer problems they are having onboard.

Believing when there is no compelling evidence is a mistake.  The idea is to withhold belief until there is compelling evidence and if the universe does not comply with our predispositions, okay, then we have the wrenching obligation to accommodate to the way the universe really is.  - Carl Sagan

Who is more humble, the scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever the universe has to teach us or somebody who says everything in this book should be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of the human beings involved in the writing of this legend - Carl Sagan

#13    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,755 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:31 PM

View PostMerc14, on 20 March 2013 - 12:51 PM, said:

I hope they solve the computer problems they are having onboard.[/size][/font]
It looks like they have, see here: Curiosity Rover Exits 'Safe Mode'.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#14    marcos anthony toledo

marcos anthony toledo

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 223 posts
  • Joined:09 Aug 2009

Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:54 PM

It is interesting all these glitches Curiosity has been having of late. I wonder what NASA is trying to cover up about life on Mars. Especially since it is really under the boot of the military masquerading as a civilian agency.


#15    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 32,755 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 20 March 2013 - 02:16 PM

View Postmarcos anthony toledo, on 20 March 2013 - 01:54 PM, said:

It is interesting all these glitches Curiosity has been having of late. I wonder what NASA is trying to cover up about life on Mars. Especially since it is really under the boot of the military masquerading as a civilian agency.
It would be nice if just once we could have a logical scientific discussion in, what is after all, the science section of the site without someone spouting off some silly conspiracy theory.

There is only one thing wrong with your post: ALL OFF IT.

If NASA was trying to cover up life on Mars why would they make the mission so public, why not make it a secret mission?
Why do they allow universities access to the raw data? Much of the information released is not done so through NASA but by research teams operating at various Universities. This is standard NASA practice.
Why are the raw images published immediately they are received on Earth? If they are involved in a cover up allowing the public to see images before they are processed would seem a rather odd way of doing things.
Why would they allow none US instruments on board?

Now if you wish to pursue you conspiracy/cover up claims please do so in the either the Extraterrestrial Life & The UFO Phenomenon section or the Conspiracies & Secret Societies section... the clues are in the names.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users