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The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


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#8101    mcrom901

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:04 AM

View Postzoser, on 03 March 2013 - 11:33 AM, said:

Corresponding logistics.

a crucial factor


#8102    Hazzard

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:22 AM

I think that most people here get it. Except poor zoser of course.

Bottom line - The claim of ancient aliens is as far away from being proven as ever. No matter how many times one throws around the "Advanced cutting = advanced civilisation = deeply ancient = visitors" slogan. To prove alien visitation (in the present or back in ancient times) we need something with a little more substance than a question mark being answered with "what else could it have been".

The matter of alien visitation will be decided by the evidence not by the intensity of opinion. Whats being offered by zoser doesnt even bear a passing resemblance to such,... his assertion falls far short of any standard of scientific proof.


Edited by Hazzard, 04 March 2013 - 11:48 AM.

I still await the compelling Exhibit A.

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#8103    third_eye

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:25 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 04 March 2013 - 03:23 AM, said:

o_O You must have tough hands. Remind me never to hire you to refinish furniture either.


Well I meant on metal surfaces ... :lol:
but you knew that ... on wood usually we scrape it off then sand down carefully when dried, using solvents might discolor or damage the wood

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They're strong enough that they were used to secure spear heads and drill points, etc. I would think cutting stone would be different than cutting wood. The biggest problem with wood saws is it gums up the cutting edge. I found too a fine coat of dirt blocks any residual stickiness.

I was referring to copper and grit alone BTW, which has been demonstrated by stocks.

I know, thing is the demonstrations is usually for a one off instance showing the viability of the idea, paints probable picture but for long term practice and use problems arises which makes it less convincing. Its easier for adhesives to stick fast to stone/hard surfaces than wood ... as wood splinters the adhesion bond breaks, but it just increases the workload and slows down progress much too much to considered 'negligible'

Going back to zoser's stone, the fine trailing end of the saw cut is a rip, fissure when the sawed part peeled away. The saw didn't go as deep or as fine as believed. I think it's an end piece of a bigger block. Can't be sure unless I'm there ...

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Power saws are the way it's normally cut in the rest of the world. The blade can be quite thin and the saws are water lubricated. They give pretty fine cuts.

Usually these gem mining communities don't have access to the sophisticated machinery we have today, don't really trust them much either, the cutting process isn't a cut and go ... it's like opening a present ... sometimes angles have to be changed, surfaces shifted because the center of the stone turned out to be not as expected from the outer.
The linked example situation differs from today's industrial gravel stone/marble harvesting as it is closer to gem standard harvested stone 'cottage industry' from times of old.

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' ... life and death carry on as they always have ~ and always will, only the dreamer is gone ~ behind the flow of imagination, beyond any effort to be still
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#8104    DBunker

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:25 PM

View PostHazzard, on 04 March 2013 - 11:22 AM, said:

I think that most people here get it. Except poor zoser of course.

Bottom line - The claim of ancient aliens is as far away from being proven as ever. No matter how many times one throws around the "Advanced cutting = advanced civilisation = deeply ancient = visitors" slogan. To prove alien visitation (in the present or back in ancient times) we need something with a little more substance than a question mark being answered with "what else could it have been".

The matter of alien visitation will be decided by the evidence not by the intensity of opinion. Whats being offered by zoser doesnt even bear a passing resemblance to such,... his assertion falls far short of any standard of scientific proof.



I could not agree more. Good post, hazz. :nw:

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#8105    scowl

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 06:51 PM

View Postbadeskov, on 03 March 2013 - 07:36 PM, said:

Or using the equivalent of sand paper...

To produce flat stone surfaces, you slide two stones of equal strength back and forth. After a lot of work, both stones will have a flat surface.


#8106    scowl

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 07:00 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 04 March 2013 - 03:23 AM, said:

Power saws are the way it's normally cut in the rest of the world. The blade can be quite thin and the saws are water lubricated. They give pretty fine cuts.

Check out these diamond-tipped band saw blades. They're used in water-cooled masonry saws for cutting granite tiles.


#8107    zoser

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:08 PM

View PostOniomancer, on 03 March 2013 - 09:30 PM, said:

0:34, what does he say? "it's even all the way through"



Trolling, or more of that famous short attention span of yours? Stocks' saw did not have teeth. Stocks' saw did not "shred". The usage ratio was 1-3 mm.
Hardly rediculous. All old, old news for this thread.

Now we know that other means than cutting were used to shape rocks, so how much cutting was actually done? I'm betting it was no where near enough to bankrupt their copper supply. Not to mention they also had bronze besides the copper. Those figures are just for stocks' method too. How do we know the AE didn't have a more efficient method?

Oh, and zoser? The copper is not doing the cutting! Get that through your head!

There, I said it. I feel better.

Utterly ridiculous.

Copper will not cut that.  

Far too thin; razor blade thin in places, visible on the left and the right.

Copper would shred instantly.  Steel would struggle.

Show me what stocks did and I'll listen.

The hole cutting by Stocks was utterly unconvincing.

Far too much copper usage for too little result.  The holes were way too small to be credible in depth.

Then consider that cut in the block; two feet or three feet wide?

You have no proof that the Inca had saws that thin.  The chroniclers never mentioned it.

It had to be ancient, and means not known to mainstream archaeology.

So without lots of bickering and denying.

Show me where Stocks did it please.  To that depth (say 1m high block, and a 3mm cut).

Prove that if you would.

Otherwise all you have is unsubstantiated claims.

Edited by zoser, 04 March 2013 - 08:10 PM.

Posted Image


#8108    DBunker

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:18 PM

View Postzoser, on 04 March 2013 - 08:08 PM, said:

Prove that if you would.

Otherwise all you have is unsubstantiated claims.

The irony. :clap:

Now that communications technology has made it possible to give global reach to the bizarre and archive it forever, it is essential for men and women of reason resolutely to counter the delusions of the fringe element. James S. Robbins

#8109    Sir Wearer of Hats

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:38 PM

View Postzoser, on 04 March 2013 - 08:08 PM, said:

You have no proof that the Inca had saws that thin.  The chroniclers never mentioned it.
That would be the "we burnt everything because they're heathens and they didn't give us all the gold when we told them to" chroniclers right?


#8110    zoser

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:52 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 04 March 2013 - 12:34 AM, said:

Zoser, you found anything, yet?

From Peru to the Middle East.  Zoser strikes again.

Game over boys.

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Conventional sawing impossible.  The surface is concave!

Posted Image

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Shades of Puma Punku perhaps?

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No further comment required.

:tu:

Edited by zoser, 04 March 2013 - 08:54 PM.

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#8111    Admiral Rhubarb

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:54 PM

Why would conventional sawing not be possible if the surface was Concave?

Life is a hideous business, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous.

H. P. Lovecraft.


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#8112    zoser

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:57 PM

View PostLord Vetinari, on 04 March 2013 - 08:54 PM, said:

Why would conventional sawing not be possible if the surface was Concave?

Think it through.

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#8113    Admiral Rhubarb

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:59 PM

I have done. Care to elaborate further?

Life is a hideous business, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous.

H. P. Lovecraft.


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#8114    Admiral Rhubarb

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 09:05 PM

Actually I haven't got time now, i have to go & see to a rabbit. c u 2moro.

Life is a hideous business, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous.

H. P. Lovecraft.


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#8115    TheSearcher

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 09:28 PM

View Postzoser, on 04 March 2013 - 08:08 PM, said:

-SNIP-

Show me where Stocks did it please.  To that depth (say 1m high block, and a 3mm cut).

Prove that if you would.

Otherwise all you have is unsubstantiated claims.

Talking of which, since you're the engineer and all, how about you show us in small scale how it's done and post it on youtube. Seen from your own link, the only thing you need is a tuning fork of larger size and a hammer....

Unless you can show us in a movie, since that is the standard you use to measure the truth, all you have is unsubstantiated claims.

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