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The Star of Bethlehem


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 11:56 AM

<strong class='bbc'>Image credit: Waldemar Flaig (1920)</strong>
Image credit: Waldemar Flaig (1920)
Roy Batham: The origin of this work was begun about 1995 when a news item concerning a new theory on the 'Star of Bethlehem' was published. Another of those theories by academics that was pure conjecture based on Roman paganism and conjunction of planets. It failed to prove anything. I decided to investigate the 'star' myself, being an interested amateur scientist of all things mystical. So with my 'Commodore 64 ' and Atari planetarium I set out to find physical evidence beginning with what was known. The star is only mentioned by St. Matthew, seen in the east and moved from the east. So what ? that is the normal pattern due to the rotation of the Earth. Was it a comet?, was it Halley's comet ? Experts say no, the dates are wrong, something I now dispute.

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#2    Roybat

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 11:58 PM

I should have mentioned in the column that I think our present year is 2079 CE. 66 years of blank history are not necessarily consecutive years.

Edited by Roybat, 07 July 2013 - 12:00 AM.


#3    nothinglizx2

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 02:30 PM

I think that people are trying to describe a physical reality event which may have actually been a spiritual event.  Only the wise men followed this star.  But only the wise would have known about it.  The Kabballah often is described as a new age practice, but back then it was much more common for Jews to practice it.  God places great emphasis on the spiritual rather than the worldly.


#4    Roybat

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Posted 09 July 2013 - 09:12 PM

View Postnothinglizx2, on 07 July 2013 - 02:30 PM, said:

I think that people are trying to describe a physical reality event which may have actually been a spiritual event.  Only the wise men followed this star.  But only the wise would have known about it.  The Kabballah often is described as a new age practice, but back then it was much more common for Jews to practice it.  God places great emphasis on the spiritual rather than the worldly.
If there was a real 'star' it would have been visible to  all. In Biblical times any unusual heavenly phenomena were looked on as omens, planetary conjunctions, solar and lunar eclipses, comets, meteor showers, all were considered ominous. I can show that all through the Bible the appearance of angels were solar eclipses, plagues were lunar eclipses. Jacob's ladder was a line up of all the planets.


#5    Gold Star

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Posted 10 July 2013 - 03:38 PM

All these reductionist writers, regardless of how ingenious (as this one is) in their astronomical theories about the "star of Bethlehem," make
the same mistake. All stars, including planets and regular comets, are always periodic in their relations to each other. Why don't we have a
birth of real importance occur each time the  same star relationships occur? Astrology would say yes, something important should happen,
but we know little or nothing important happens  when these  conjunctions, or reappearances of Halley' comet, happen. Christianity tells us
Christ's birth was a unique, one-time  intervention of the divine into human  affairs, and so the star of Bethlehem should also be a one-time
only occurrence. This would suggest a comet coming from afar into the solar system and then permanently exiting. The comet had  enough
spiritual significance to be considered  miraculous, especially since only the three wise men definitely saw it and considered it important
enough to make a trip of hundreds of miles  (something  astrologers as a group aren't known for). So I ignore the people claiming the star
of Bethlehem was simply a periodic astronomical event. But interesting work does need to be recognized.


#6    Oakum

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:44 AM

In my opinion, I think the true nature of this "Star of Bethlehem" was in fact a brightly lit 'Starship". There are many references of brightly lit chariots in the skies of those days spewing fire, thunder and turning wheels with many wings ect... in the Bible, and some were referred to as clouds hovering in the sky by day giving them shade and by night, a beacon of light to guide them through their 40 year trek in the wilderness, not to mention on occasion hearing the voice of God like many waters uttered out of those glowing clouds. Therefore, the Star of Bethlehem as it appeared was in fact a brightly lit starship and not some celestial event hovering in the night sky. For the people in those days could not describe accurately what they were witnessing in mere words of what they were looking at shiny metallic aircraft flying and hovering about in their skies. Because these starships were up there among the clouds the local simply described them as clouds. They did not have words like airplane flying-saucer or UFO in those days to describe this phenomena.

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#7    Roybat

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 07:51 AM

I agree that  the 'star ' could have been anything or nothing. Citing the other occurrences of Saul's and Constantine's visions my main point is that our calendar was started in the wrong year.


#8    Sundew

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 05:12 PM

The Magi were interpreters of dreams in the kingdom of Medo-Perisa. By the time the Persians took Babylon, Daniel the prophet had already been given the power of dream interpretation by God and had done so for Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, on at least two occasions. When Babylon was overthrown, basically without a fight, Cyrus the Great recognized his God-given talent of understanding dreams and put Daniel in charge of the Magi, which by right was an hereditary office, the jealousy of putting a Jewish outsider in charge of their order is what eventually led to some of Magi tricking the king (by entrapment using Persian law) to try and have Daniel killed by throwing him into the lion's den; the laws of Medo-Persian once enacted could not be rescinded, even by the king. Daniel survived only by God's protection and it is believe that later he went on to train some of the Magi who were loyal to him about events concerning his revelations of the future Messiah and the timing of his coming. The Magi's visit to Judea was therefore no accident; they knew from what God had reveled to Daniel the exact time of the Messiah's birth. The star was said to go before them and then stand still over the place where the Messiah (Jesus) was. Therefore it was not a normal star of a natural event of a conjunction of planets; it was a supernatural event given for a particular purpose: to lead the Magi. Interestingly Herod, of whom the Magi first enquired about the Messiah, had the same information in the Book of Daniel that the Magi had been given, but either did not understand it or perhaps God hid the knowledge from him, since he was a throughly evil despot. Daniel had much to say not only about the four world Kingdoms staring with Babylon (followed by Medo-Persia, Greece and Rome) but also details of the lives of these leaders (especially Alexander the Great and his four successors who divided his kingdom), the Messiah's birth and rejection, and events yet in our future including the last Gentile world empire and the return of the Messiah, and all hundreds (even thousands) of years before these events occurred. To have such detailed knowledge of the future was certainly beyond what mortal man knows on his own power. It's too band people tend to take an either/or position on science and religion, there is room for both; they are two different disciplines.





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