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Preserved Mammoth found with flowing blood

lyakhovsky islands mammoth blood flowing

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32 replies to this topic

#16    pallidin

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 07:30 PM

Interesting possibility.

Heck, I'm all for it. It's not like it's a T-rex or something.


#17    Sundew

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 07:59 PM

View PostCapt Amerika, on 31 May 2013 - 03:16 PM, said:

Once an animal has gone extinct it needs to stay gone.
bringing species back could have tragic consequences for the current food chain and nature in general.

Or it could have just the opposite effect. If mammoths were a part of the arctic ecosystem and now they are gone, then a piece of that system is missing. In tropical areas like Africa, elephants keep waterholes open for other wildlife during the dry season; it is possible that the mammoths benefited wild life in their environment in some way that we know nothing about.

Then too, what was the cause of their extinction? If primitive man drove them to extinction then perhaps we have an obligation to try and restore them. There are already parks being started in areas of the tundra where various grazing animals (musk oxen, bison, wild horses) have been reintroduced and the tundra is returning to its former grassland environment, one capable of sustaining large herbivores. The mammoth would be just another addition. There have been studies down that prove the more animals you have on the land the more fertile it becomes, as long as you rotate them to new areas. It is the lack of grazing and animal dung that causes infertility, erosion and low species diversity in the land.

The tourist dollars alone would help the local economy. The research into recreating extinct species would be advanced. An iconic beast would roam the wilds once more. Seems like a win/win and I don't see a down side, it's not like they are going to run amok in downtown Moscow or Ontario.

Edited by Sundew, 31 May 2013 - 08:00 PM.


#18    TxGoblin

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:30 PM

Actually the ecological niche the Mammoth lived in needs to be rebuilt. The entire food chain of its natural habitat should be in place before any such project is undertaken. Granted they could be kept in a zoo like environment until things like natural predators are in place. Just look at the damage wild Elephants do in Africa and India. Bringing back an animal just for scientific curiosity just isn't right. We would end up opening a hunting season or domestication for food. Does this sound like a good reason to bring back a noble beast from the past. I say let the species rest. Another point to consider is that not all were flash frozen and the species died out in other remote locations for a reason. Genetics, disease or predation? We really don't know for sure. I hope that these researchers are treating this organic material as a bio-hazard until we know more about their demise. It would be a sad thing to reintroduce yet again another plague on the planet.


#19    Xanthurion2

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:46 PM

That is awesome. I can't wait until they successfully clone one.


#20    Junior Chubb

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:00 PM

Begun the Clone Wars have...

I've flown from one side of this galaxy to the other. I've seen a lot of strange stuff, but I've never seen anything to make me believe there's one all-powerful Force controlling everything. There's no mystical energy field that controls my destiny. Anyway, it's all a lot of simple tricks and nonsense.

#21    Irna

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:42 PM

An interesting view of this story: http://mammothtales....ns-of-salt.html


#22    Silver Surfer

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 10:08 PM

View PostTroublehalf, on 31 May 2013 - 02:18 PM, said:

They are also multi-purpose, with meat for food, wool for clothes, skin for leather, tusks for various things. Plus, the creature is large and therefore could sustain a large population. The trick will be domesticating and finding food for it to eat.

This is an important step in both science and human development. Mammoths could allow previously inhospitable places easier to survive in. No need to worry about them being eaten by something as I doubt much could take one down, lots of uses and hardy.

Oh yea good call man  ><.. so we bring back Mammoths so we can domesticate them.. eat them and clothe ourselves. Lucky MAMMOTH!
Poor b******* would rather stay dead i think then come back for your uses.

Do you eat blue whale for dinner?


#23    Uncle Sam

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 03:55 AM

View PostTroublehalf, on 31 May 2013 - 02:18 PM, said:

Mammoths are only being cloned because 1. It's a scientific goal to achieve and 2. They are going to be able to survive tough winter conditions in places like Serbia and so on.

They are also multi-purpose, with meat for food, wool for clothes, skin for leather, tusks for various things. Plus, the creature is large and therefore could sustain a large population. The trick will be domesticating and finding food for it to eat.

This is an important step in both science and human development. Mammoths could allow previously inhospitable places easier to survive in. No need to worry about them being eaten by something as I doubt much could take one down, lots of uses and hardy.

All this does in terms of Jurassic Park is open up the possibility that there is frozen blood of a dinosaur somewhere that could be used. However, would there be much use for them? Who knows.

As for viable "raptor" blood, you need to specify which raptor. Bambiraptors are only 1.3 metres in size... Velociraptors are also small. Utah Raptors are the ones to worry about the most though. There are lots of other dinosaurs though, but chances of finding even one with blood.....

To be honest, if we could domesticate Raptors, they would make amazing pets. Look at loads of predator animals we have domesticated that are used in hunts. Image having a pack of raptors to help you hunt down your prey, because these creatures are so well adapt at hunting their prey.

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#24    HuntrSThompsun

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 06:36 AM

The one best thing I've dreamed to see before I die was to see a real living dinosaur of sorts living walking and breathing.. this will be the most beautiful thing I've seen to walk in my eternal life if this gets successfully .. my uncle was eduard Storch. This was his dying dream, and my own!

The one best thing I've dreamed to see before I die was to see a real living dinosaur of sorts living walking and breathing.. this will be the most beautiful thing I've seen to walk in my eternal life if this gets successfully .. my uncle was eduard Storch. This was his dying dream, and my own!


#25    GirlfromOz

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 09:54 AM

So now we have the ability to recreate a being that passed on many many years ago.My question is,do we really want this?The dinosaurs passed away with the disputed reasoning as to why.So,how could man survive with the threat of a being that threatens his livelihood?


#26    skookum

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 12:28 PM

I don't know why we always associate Mammoths alongside Dinosaurs.  Mammoths co-existed with humans, so tells me they would be able to survive with the current oxygen percentage levels.  I doubt a cloned Dinosaur would be able to cope with the 10% less oxygen level available today and get so large.

As far as I am aware man would have been the only creature able to bring down an adult Mammoth, so any worry of lack natural predators isn't a major worry.  In any case it would take thousands of years for them to reproduce in any numbers to become overpopulated.  The UK lost all it's big predators (bears, big cats etc) due to over hunting.  It has not caused other animals to grow in population size that would effect their habitat.

I think there would be a great deal to learn from a small breeding program in Siberia.  Don't put them in zoo's, they could be radio tagged and studied in their natural habitat.

A real interesting find would be a frozen dinosaur.  I am not sure however if any thing can remain preserved after 70 million years.  Seeing that we have recovered both tissue and blood from various Mammoth finds but have still not created another Mammoth the Jurassic Park idea I think will remain purely fantasy.

Edited by skookum, 01 June 2013 - 12:35 PM.


#27    chopmo

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 09:27 PM

"Oops we accidently unleashed an ancient animal flu disease"



Haha seriously in my opinion i think it's vice versa I hope they are carefull.


#28    SameerPrehistorica

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 12:03 PM

View PostCapt Amerika, on 31 May 2013 - 03:16 PM, said:

Once an animal has gone extinct it needs to stay gone.
bringing species back could have tragic consequences for the current food chain and nature in general.

I quite agree with what you said and i don't believe that they can bring them back.

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#29    psyche101

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 05:11 AM

View Postmoonshadow60, on 29 May 2013 - 08:40 PM, said:

I have heard that the Russians did eat the meat from wooly mammoths that they had excavated in the past.


LINK - Did Explorer's eat Mammoth Meat?

Even when mammoth meat isn't actually putrid, it still doesn't make great eating. According to Richard Stone's book Mammoth (2001), Russian zoologist Alexei Tikhonov (who figures in articles about the recent Siberian find) once tried a bite and said "it was awful. It tasted like meat left too long in a freezer."

One of the best-documented accounts of a prehistoric meal comes at the end of Frozen Fauna of the Mammoth Steppe (1990), by Alaska zoology professor Dale Guthrie. After successfully unearthing and preserving "Blue Babe," a 36,000-year-old steppe bison found near Fairbanks in 1979, Guthrie's team celebrates by simmering some leftover flesh from Babe's neck "in a pot of stock and vegetables." The author reports that "the meat was well aged but still a little tough, and it gave the stew a strong Pleistocene aroma."

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#30    psyche101

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 05:39 AM

View Postancient astronaut, on 31 May 2013 - 01:45 PM, said:

You need not worry about this one. It's when they(scientists)find viable raptor blood, then we might have a problem.

Posted Image

Things are what they are. - Me Reality can't be debunked. That's the beauty of it. - Capeo 'If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.' - Sir Isaac Newton. "Let me repeat the lesson learned from the Sturrock scientific review panel: Pack up your old data and forget it. Ufology needs new data, new cases, new rigorous and scientific methodologies if it hopes ever to get out of its pit." Ed Stewart. Youtube is the last refuge of the ignorant and is more often used for disinformation than genuine research.  There is a REASON for PEER REVIEW... - Chrlzs. Nothing is inexplicable, just unexplained. - Sir Wearer of Hats.





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