Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Asian viewpoint of US and NATO in Afghanistan


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1    Spiral staircase

Spiral staircase

    Breaking

  • Member
  • 3,607 posts
  • Joined:27 May 2011

  • Such an ugly feeling that won't leave.

Posted 18 May 2013 - 06:00 AM

Quote

Recent events in the American occupation of Afghanistan including the death of a U.S. diplomat, a drone strike near the Pakistan border which killed 18 people, including women and children and a looming 2014 deadline for cessation of American combat operations in the country have highlighted the futility of the longest war in America's history.

<snip>

Apart from India and Pakistan (whose motives are suspect), the United States and its NATO allies have consistently failed to consult experts from the region.

This is particularly galling given that leaders such as Turkish Prime Minister Recep Erdogan are far better respected in the Muslim world than any American official and therefore in a far better position to broker a lasting settlement.

This is not just a Bush Administration policy. In 2010, President Obama did not consult any Asian leaders before deciding on sending in more troops.

Given the region's history, Asians are very skeptical about occupying armies from the West. The attempts of Western governments to portray their actions as noble are far from persuasive to those with knowledge of their colonial pasts.

This is despite the fact that most Asians have little love for the extreme ideologies of the West's enemies in the region.

Asians are not easily duped by the blatant oversimplification of whole nations into "good and bad guys."

The portrayal of everyone, Afghan or otherwise, as terrorists simply because they are unwilling to accept occupation is incorrect and immoral.

Even if one accepts that there is a core of fighters who represent the Taliban, it is intellectually dishonest and naive not to accept that oppressed people fight invaders.

It is very likely that many have picked up arms in the tradition of resistance to a foreign army.

Asians see the hypocrisy that what was once celebrated and actively supported by America in the 1980s, when the local populace took up arms against the Soviet Union, is now condemned as terrorism.

Asians have found themselves unwilling to accept the version of current events that has been packaged by the Western media and politicians. And they have access to a far more balanced view from regional news sources.

<snip>

They are also not going to be duped, as they were during the war in Vietnam, which portrayed the Vietcong as bloodthirsty commies and goons.

<snip>

Asians might abhor Taliban extremism, but they do not support a misguided invasion that has cost hundreds of thousands of lives and caused untold damage.

They have little faith in Western armies operating in Asia and officially espousing good intentions. The record of western politicians refusing to accept responsibility for creating another quagmire is too long and remains too fresh.

Asians also do not fear the Taliban marching across the region and spreading their beliefs. While Islamic fundamentalism has support in certain quarters, most Asians believe this is containable through dialogue.

So what should the US do now?

<snip>

The old ways of hard power have failed, as we are witnessing yet again, and must be replaced. This requires that the United States make way for regional brokers who may have subtler and more effective diplomatic power.

US and NATO in Afghanistan — An Asian Viewpoint

The US and NATO approach has destabilized the region with little clarity of what was gained in advantage. The area will have to heal. Read the full article for suggestions offered.

While not mentioned in it, there does seem to be a vacuum that will be created within the region, this will allow new players to rise, which might be good if the suggestions in the article are followed, or it can allow, as in the case of Iraq, for other regional players to fill the vacuum, as Iran now holds a great deal of sway in Iraq.


#2    and then

and then

    Abyssus Abyssum Invocat

  • Member
  • 12,869 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Land's End

  • Because what came before never seems enough...

Posted 18 May 2013 - 08:23 AM

View PostLeave Britney alone!, on 18 May 2013 - 06:00 AM, said:

US and NATO in Afghanistan — An Asian Viewpoint

The US and NATO approach has destabilized the region with little clarity of what was gained in advantage. The area will have to heal. Read the full article for suggestions offered.

While not mentioned in it, there does seem to be a vacuum that will be created within the region, this will allow new players to rise, which might be good if the suggestions in the article are followed, or it can allow, as in the case of Iraq, for other regional players to fill the vacuum, as Iran now holds a great deal of sway in Iraq.
Ahh the bliss of a post American utopia.  It's all so simple.

  Imagination is the power in the turn of a phrase.

#3    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,586 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:29 AM

I don't think Asians have any better idea what to do about Afghanistan than anyone else.  The same applies to a lot of places.


#4    Mikko-kun

Mikko-kun

    Docking station

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,401 posts
  • Joined:27 Apr 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Circle

Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:35 AM

Can't blame the US. troops on that. Maybe ones who sent them though. Cracks me up to think that you've been trying to teach all-day doping guys how to use a toilet and the basics of fighting all these years. No offense... that in addition to the operations.

Edited by Saru, 18 May 2013 - 11:02 AM.
Removed video due to copyright

I'll be gone.

#5    Frank Merton

Frank Merton

    Blue fish

  • Member
  • 12,586 posts
  • Joined:22 Jan 2013
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

  • I dunno --

Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:37 AM

One thing that bothers me is that it is the young ones who die in wars.  No army anywhere would want me, and I'm much more expendable now than when I was young


#6    Mikko-kun

Mikko-kun

    Docking station

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,401 posts
  • Joined:27 Apr 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Circle

Posted 18 May 2013 - 10:11 AM

Very good point Frank. Anyone can be of use in the war, it really doesn't take so much but just a few right things: either be a good commander or a good follower, and be of more use than what you weight, carry your weight and all that. Looking at how they have mainly just desert there, they could really use people who can make a change to that.

I'll be gone.

#7    topsecretresearch

topsecretresearch

    Astral Projection

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 692 posts
  • Joined:14 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 19 May 2013 - 01:10 PM

The US is focusing more on Asia these days because playing cowboy vs indian in the Mid East is getting old. It's time to leave dodge after shooting up the town. No more Crazy Horse.

Edited by topsecretresearch, 19 May 2013 - 01:16 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users