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Consumers not open to electric cars


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#16    Br Cornelius

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:50 AM

Electric cars are intrinsically more reliable with less moving parts. They break the Car manufacturing business model which makes a significant portion of its overall profits from aftercare services such as oil changes and official parts. This is all but gone with Electric cars and so the manufacturer is forced to front load the profitability into the initial purchase. Coupled to this is the fact that many car manufacturers are heavily invested into petrochemicals which is another area of profit which is unavailable to the manufacturer.

Hi-Tech batteries are resource hungry of rare precisious minerals and so will remain relatively expensive. Coupled to this is the fact that if a user doesn't understand their requirements they can shorten their battery life by many years. In many senses Battery leasing is the only sensible model for electric cars - but the current market means that the lease arrangments make running an electric car as expensive as putting the equivilent amount of petrol in the tank. Again this is another way of the manufacturers attempting to retain the diminished after sales profitability which they have lost by going electric. It will take an agressive competitive new entrant to the battery market to break this strangle hold which the car manufacturers will attempt to place onto their new customer base.

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#17    AsteroidX

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:29 AM

My dentist told me she may turn her electric car in because the remote control doesnt let you turn on the heater without unplugging it first. She said the whole point of having the remote was so she could turn the heater on from inside. But instead she has to go outdside to unplug it first defeating the whole purpose.

So shes talking about turning it in if the car doesnt fix itself.


#18    little_dreamer

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:25 AM

View PostlibstaK, on 09 January 2013 - 10:41 AM, said:

You know this kind of reminds me of when Starbucks left Aust.  Their reasoning was "Australian Consumers are clearly not coffee connoisseurs".  Actually, I thought at the time, NO,  Australian Consumers know when they are paying twice as much for a cuppa as their USA counterparts and don't like being ripped off :whistle: .


Starbucks is mediocre and not great.   I'm mostly interested in their wireless internet at the store.   I brew 99% of my coffee at home anyway.

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#19    libstaK

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:14 AM

View Postlittle_dreamer, on 10 January 2013 - 12:25 AM, said:

Starbucks is mediocre and not great.   I'm mostly interested in their wireless internet at the store.   I brew 99% of my coffee at home anyway.
LOL tell them that, they left in huff thinking they were God's gift, meh.

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#20    skookum

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:05 AM

View PostJinxdom, on 07 January 2013 - 10:03 AM, said:

Not surprised the things are to expensive right now. My friend went with some electric car and one of the batteries had a mishap and it nearly cost him 3k to get it replaced and fixed. If the price dropped enough and the range improved all be all for it but electric cars aren't really all the feasible where I live. Too much hassle and half the time if I went to the city, I wouldn't actually make it home.
Kind of fond of hybrids though but it just isn't worth the cost to change to a hybrid then go to an electric car when they do actually work.

3k is a bargain.The Nissan Leaf which is currently in production in the UK batteries are an estimated 7k to replace, although Nissan will only give an estimated cost.  The lifespan of them depends very much of how they are charged.  At very best the lifespan (assuming you trickle charge them only) can be between 6-10 years.  If they are fast charged like what is going to be offered at the Dealership the battery life will drop by about half.

They use Li-ion (Lithium ion) batteries which are also quite sensitive to temperature when charging.  I work with these a fair bit now and have be warned it is not safe to charge them if the ambient temperature is under 0 degrees C.  A full charge will take 13 hours, with a claim of 109 miles range.  Unfortunately that is just cruising and some tests have had it as low as 47 miles in heavy traffic.

The idea is good and the Leaf is a very good car but I couldn't part with £30k for something with very limited capability, be a complete an utter nightmare if I fancied going further than its battery range and will cost me probably half its value to maintain in about 5 years.

Edited by skookum, 13 January 2013 - 10:06 AM.

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#21    DKO

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:26 AM

Give it time, they'll gradually start getting more efficient and cheaper.

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#22    sam12six

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:10 AM

If any company with deep enough pockets wants to do so, here's how they can take over the auto market a city at a time:

1) Manufacture an electric car with easily switched batteries.
2) Establish "fuel stations" around the target city that allow those signed into the program to instantly switch to fully fueled batteries.
3) Profit.

As they take over adjascent areas, the usefulness would increase because you'd then be able to drive to the limit of the battery and head to a fuel station in another area.

Until someone does something like this (or batteries massively improve), nobody but people with a ton of money will want to spend double on a car that only goes half the distance per fueling and for which fueling takes half a day as opposed to a couple of minutes.


#23    Br Cornelius

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:17 AM

Better public transport and local small commuter vehicles - that's the answer.

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#24    sam12six

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 11:35 AM

View PostBr Cornelius, on 13 January 2013 - 11:17 AM, said:

Better public transport and local small commuter vehicles - that's the answer.

Br Cornelius

It's definitely the answer in heavily populated areas.

Where I live, it's not unusual for someone to commute an hour or more one way via car. Traveling 60+ miles twice a day on public transport would take forever. Some thought needs to be put into more efficient private vehicles along with an improved public transport system.


#25    Br Cornelius

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:20 PM

View Postsam12six, on 13 January 2013 - 11:35 AM, said:

It's definitely the answer in heavily populated areas.

Where I live, it's not unusual for someone to commute an hour or more one way via car. Traveling 60+ miles twice a day on public transport would take forever. Some thought needs to be put into more efficient private vehicles along with an improved public transport system.
The much criticized Agenda 21 is all about intelligent planning such that people can work within easy reach of work and such that they can readily do so using public transport. It is a blueprint for sustainable local communities which will not implode once oil gets unaffordable. Suburbia is a ticking time bomb just waiting to plunge millions of people into poverty.

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#26    sam12six

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 05:36 PM

View PostBr Cornelius, on 13 January 2013 - 04:20 PM, said:

The much criticized Agenda 21 is all about intelligent planning such that people can work within easy reach of work and such that they can readily do so using public transport. It is a blueprint for sustainable local communities which will not implode once oil gets unaffordable. Suburbia is a ticking time bomb just waiting to plunge millions of people into poverty.

Br Cornelius

I agree.

The thing is, improving efficiency of personal vehicles will push that explosion back to allow more time for the planning and execution of a more sustainable employment grid. To pull it off, there's going to need to be far more emphasis on relatively local goods and services. This sort of thing doesn't happen overnight...


#27    Artaxerxes

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 09:30 PM

They cost too damn much.  Bring the price down to $10,000 and I might think about it.

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#28    MichaelW

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:17 AM

View PostArtaxerxes, on 13 January 2013 - 09:30 PM, said:

They cost too damn much.  Bring the price down to $10,000 and I might think about it.

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You get what you pay for.

I certainly wouldn't pay for an electric car that cost $10,000.

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#29    skookum

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:04 PM

View PostMichaelW, on 23 January 2013 - 10:17 AM, said:

You get what you pay for.

I certainly wouldn't pay for an electric car that cost $10,000.

Plus they worked out more expensive to run than a Golf Bluemation on cost of fuel vs electricity.

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