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some interesting myth beasts


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#1    man_in_mudboots

man_in_mudboots

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Posted 25 January 2004 - 10:55 PM

CATOBLEPAS

DESCRIPTION - like a huge bull, with iron scales either blood red or just metallic, with an over sized head, a mane made of iron, its tail is sometimes described as like a snakes or a dragons (i take this to mean with a spear head on the end like dragons are drawn with), and it can kill anything by a glance or breathing on it.

BEHAVIOR - it eats grass and wanders around stupidly. yes, thats pretty much all it does! it cannot see thorough the mane or lift its head, fortunate characteristics because its powers of death on sight and poisonous breath are used only on the grass it eats that way.

POSSIBLY - a blue gnu, a creature like a wildebeast that tends to walk with its head down and is grayish colored, which would explain how it got mistaken for iron scales.

it lives in ethiopia and was 'sighted' by Pliny. in his natural history book he describes it right after the famous paragraph about the basilisk.

more info coming.


#2    man_in_mudboots

man_in_mudboots

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Posted 25 January 2004 - 11:04 PM

MANTICORE

DESCRIPTION - with the body like a lion or tiger, always colored reddish brown, a face like a persons, a long tail with a cluster of poisonous barbs at the end, bright blue, mezmerizing eyes, 3 rows of razor sharp teeth, sometimes it is pictured with a tail like a scorpians, bat wings, bull like horns, or no mane.  

BEHAVIOR - it stalks through the forest, shoots the cluster of barbs on its tail like arrows at enemies or prey, can sing like a trumpet, or hypnotize prey with its eyes, like a snake.

POSSIBLY - a tiger, but most likely just something made up.

it lives in india. pliny supposedly saw this one, too.

Edited by man_in_mudboots, 26 January 2004 - 08:53 PM.


#3    man_in_mudboots

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Posted 27 January 2004 - 08:59 PM

http://webhome.idirect.com/~donlong/monste...rs/monsters.htm
this will get you to the greastest mythical beast sight o the internet. you can find manticores, catoblepas, and everything else mythical known to man!

Hey, that was my first link ever! it worked, joc! thanks beaucoup!
for some reason i couldnt transfer the particular page on manticores or catobs, os ill cut the whole article.

"Thre huge grete teeth in his throte...the voys of a serpente in suche wyse that by his swete songe he draweth to hym the peple and deuoureth them." This account of the Manticore in Bartholomaeus Anglicus' De proprietatibus rerum (Of the properties of things) describes the most frightening features of the manticore. Physically, the manticore was know as having the body of a red lion, human face, ears and blue eyes, three rows of teeth in each jaw, a fatal sting like a scorpion's in the end of his tail, and poisoned spines along the tail which could be shot, like arrows in any direction. The manticore was also attributed with having a voice that was the mixture of pipes and a trumpet. The beast is very swift and has very powerful leaps. The manticore is reputed to roam in the jungles of India, and is known to have an appetite for humans. The earliest accounts seem to be from Persian legend. The name itself is from the old Persian martikhoras meaning 'man-eater'. The earliest accounts of the existence of the manticore come from the Persian courts in the fifth century B.C. documented by Ctesias, a Greek physician at the Persian court. Greek and Roman authors (Aristotle, Pliny) described the beast the same way the Persians had. As early as the second century A.D., writers thought that the manticore was nothing more than a man-eating Indian tiger. The physical embellishments, either indicative of the fears the people had for the beast or anecdotal exaggeration or misinterpretations of Indian sculptures. In the middle ages, the manticore was the emblem for the profit Jeremiah because the manticore lives in the depths of the earth and Jeremiah had been thrown into a dung pit. At the same time, the manticore became the symbol of tyranny, disparagement and envy, and ultimately the embodiment of evil. As late as the 1930s it was still considered by the peasants of Spain, to be a beast of ill omen. A thirteenth century romance about Alexander the Great called Kyng Alisaunder, says that he lost 30 000 men to such beasts as adders, lions, bears, dragons, unicorns, and manticeros.


Greek, catoblepas means "that which looks downward". As its head is so heavy, this ironclad bull constantly looks downward. If it was not for this, the creature would have destroyed all life as its eyes cast immediate death, and its breath will do the same, much like the basilisk. This African creature is said to eat poisonous shrubs and bushes, and is quite sluggish. Some have compared it to the gnu, another African creature, as the gnu often holds its head near to the ground. In the middle ages, the catoblepas was sometimes called a gorgon, because of its ability to kill with sight.


both are form gareth longs encyclopedia.






Edited by man_in_mudboots, 28 January 2004 - 03:59 PM.





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