Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


* * * * - 7 votes

The Ancient Alien Theory Is True


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
10148 replies to this topic

#3991    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005

Posted 03 January 2013 - 01:34 PM

Figure 17 . Ephedra andina in their natural environment.
Image obtained from Hanfmediem portal.

Figure 18 . Sketches descriptive of Ephedra andina. AG. Ephedra andina Poepp. Ex Meyer, A. Branch of a female plant (X 1); B. Female strobilus (X 50); C. Fruit (X 50); D. Branches of a male plant (X 1), E. Male inflorescence (X 50); F. Male strobilus (X 50); G. Male flower (X 50).
Art Gallery. Digital Library of the University of Chile (Santiago).



http://www2.uah.es/v...quebrantahuesos

If you look at  the images, then you'll see it looks nothing like plants with normally shaped, but spongy, and red to purple leaves.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 03 January 2013 - 01:35 PM.


#3992    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005

Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:48 PM

Another candidate for the herb with red leaves (I found it by googling Oniomancer's suggestion, philodendron + oxalate):



Plant exposures are some of the most frequent poisonings reported to poison control centers. Exposures to plants containing oxalate crystals, such as Philodendron and Dieffenbachia, are among the most common toxic plant exposures reported in the US.

For the past 200 years, the irritant properties of the Dieffenbachia plant have had various uses, including punishing slaves and treating gout, impotence, and frigidity. Today, plants containing oxalate are admired for their ornamental beauty and found in public places and homes.

The following plants contain oxalates:

Anthurium (Anthurium species)
Arum, Araceae (Arisaema species)
   Caladium (Caladium bicolor)
Calla lily (Zantedeschia species)
Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema species)
Dieffenbachia (Dieffenbachia species)
Jack-in-the pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)
Monstera, Ceriman (Monstera deliciosa)
Nephthytis (Syngonium podophyllum)
Philodendron (Philodendron species)
Pothos or Hunter's robe (Epipremnum aureum)
Skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus)


http://emedicine.med...817016-overview



Caladium is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae. They are often known by the common name elephant ear (which they share with the closely related genera Alocasia, Colocasia, and Xanthosoma), Heart of Jesus, and Angel Wings. There are over 1000 named cultivars of Caladium bicolor from the original South American plant.

The genus Caladium includes seven species, which are indigenous to Brazil and to neighboring areas of South America and Central America. They grow in open areas of the forest and on the banks of rivers and go dormant during the dry season. The wild plants grow to 15–35 inches (40–90 cm) tall, with leaves mostly 6-18 inches (15–45 cm) long and broad.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caladium

Posted Image
Posted Image

Caladium contains oxalate crystals causing burning and irritation when eaten.

http://www.tropilab.com/caladium.html


The guy I quoted from a page or so back said the plant we are looking for is common in florist's shops, and this one most certainly is. But are the leaves 'spongy'?

"We have now found out what the plant is, what the leaf is, and it’s quite well known. It’s a very common plant. As a matter of fact, we use it for ornamental purposes. You can buy it in the stores, in a florist’s in New York. The Latin name escapes me, but its got ordinary sort of rather spongy-looking red leaves–it’s red and purple instead of being green. It has a substance in it that is a very strong alkali and not an acid."

http://www.unexplain...55#entry4604823

.

Edited by Abramelin, 03 January 2013 - 05:03 PM.


#3993    zoser

zoser

    Sapphire

  • Member
  • 10,009 posts
  • Joined:19 Aug 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:23 PM

View PostDBunker, on 02 January 2013 - 10:12 PM, said:

All this clown zoser has is fantasy, opinion and BS..... lots and lots of it.

Buckets of that coming from the skeptics camp.  Nothing substantiated, just fantasy on top of fantasy.

Archaeological theories in tatters and very soon they themselves will be the fringe.

You can bet your life on it.

View PostAbramelin, on 03 January 2013 - 04:48 PM, said:

Another candidate for the herb with red leaves (I found it by googling Oniomancer's suggestion, philodendron + oxalate):



Plant exposures are some of the most frequent poisonings reported to poison control centers. Exposures to plants containing oxalate crystals, such as Philodendron and Dieffenbachia, are among the most common toxic plant exposures reported in the US.

For the past 200 years, the irritant properties of the Dieffenbachia plant have had various uses, including punishing slaves and treating gout, impotence, and frigidity. Today, plants containing oxalate are admired for their ornamental beauty and found in public places and homes.

The following plants contain oxalates:

Anthurium (Anthurium species)
Arum, Araceae (Arisaema species)
   Caladium (Caladium bicolor)
Calla lily (Zantedeschia species)
Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema species)
Dieffenbachia (Dieffenbachia species)
Jack-in-the pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)
Monstera, Ceriman (Monstera deliciosa)
Nephthytis (Syngonium podophyllum)
Philodendron (Philodendron species)
Pothos or Hunter's robe (Epipremnum aureum)
Skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus)


http://emedicine.med...817016-overview



Caladium is a genus of flowering plants in the family Araceae. They are often known by the common name elephant ear (which they share with the closely related genera Alocasia, Colocasia, and Xanthosoma), Heart of Jesus, and Angel Wings. There are over 1000 named cultivars of Caladium bicolor from the original South American plant.

The genus Caladium includes seven species, which are indigenous to Brazil and to neighboring areas of South America and Central America. They grow in open areas of the forest and on the banks of rivers and go dormant during the dry season. The wild plants grow to 15–35 inches (40–90 cm) tall, with leaves mostly 6-18 inches (15–45 cm) long and broad.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caladium




Caladium contains oxalate crystals causing burning and irritation when eaten.

http://www.tropilab.com/caladium.html


The guy I quoted from a page or so back said the plant we are looking for is common in florist's shops, and this one most certainly is. But are the leaves 'spongy'?

"We have now found out what the plant is, what the leaf is, and it’s quite well known. It’s a very common plant. As a matter of fact, we use it for ornamental purposes. You can buy it in the stores, in a florist’s in New York. The Latin name escapes me, but its got ordinary sort of rather spongy-looking red leaves–it’s red and purple instead of being green. It has a substance in it that is a very strong alkali and not an acid."

http://www.unexplain...55#entry4604823

.

Trust a Dutchman to bring us flowers to liven up the forum!

Posted Image


#3994    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:25 PM

I do realize this thread seems to go way off-topic.

But the premise was that aliens were involved in the building of some of the megalithic structures we can find all over the world.

And then that the way these structures  look is a sign of some unknown, highly advanced technology.

One of the possible answers is that the ancients - in this case, the natives of South America -  used a chemical brewage based on herbal juices that was able to soften stone.

And now we are in the process of finding out what plant that could have been.

View Postzoser, on 03 January 2013 - 05:23 PM, said:


Trust a Dutchman to bring us flowers to liven up the forum!

LOL.

:tu:


.

Edited by Abramelin, 03 January 2013 - 05:25 PM.


#3995    zoser

zoser

    Sapphire

  • Member
  • 10,009 posts
  • Joined:19 Aug 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:29 PM

View Postseeder, on 02 January 2013 - 09:37 PM, said:

Which specialists?
And how many specialists have you read about?
More than 2-3?
Which of those
is qualified?
In what?

Name some names zoser, provide some links...and... 'forget the textbooks'  is usually how conspiracy theorists begin...

Archaeologists never consult specialists.  How about Chris Dunn and Roger Hopkins for a start.  Comments from these experts have been posted here recently.

Posted Image


#3996    zoser

zoser

    Sapphire

  • Member
  • 10,009 posts
  • Joined:19 Aug 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:37 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 03 January 2013 - 05:25 PM, said:

I do realize this thread seems to go way off-topic.

But the premise was that aliens were involved in the building of some of the megalithic structures we can find all over the world.

And then that the way these structures  look is a sign of some unknown, highly advanced technology.

One of the possible answers is that the ancients - in this case, the natives of South America -  used a chemical brewage based on herbal juices that was able to soften stone.

And now we are in the process of finding out what plant that could have been.



LOL.

:tu:


I admire you for trying Abe I really do.

There's a hell of a long way to go even if someone comes up with a plant that remotely fits the description.

Too many logistics now fit the soft stone theory for it to be false.  The very edges of the stone may become workable with the application of a rare chemical to allow say sculpting to take place on a stature, but for positioning the blocks at Sacsayhuaman and the various megalithic sites is quite another.

By all means carry on.

Edited by zoser, 03 January 2013 - 05:37 PM.

Posted Image


#3997    zoser

zoser

    Sapphire

  • Member
  • 10,009 posts
  • Joined:19 Aug 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:40 PM

View Postseeder, on 02 January 2013 - 09:28 PM, said:



Besides, how can anyone determine the depth of the hole or shape, in your pic?


Maybe use your eyes a little and read the post a little more carefully instead of assuming that you know what is said.

I did provide the title of the video clip where the picture came from!

:blush:

Posted Image


#3998    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:42 PM

View Postzoser, on 03 January 2013 - 05:37 PM, said:

I admire you for trying Abe I really do.

There's a hell of a long way to go even if someone comes up with a plant that remotely fits the description.

Too many logistics now fit the soft stone theory for it to be false.  The very edges of the stone may become workable with the application of a rare chemical to allow say sculpting to take place on a stature, but for positioning the blocks at Sacsayhuaman and the various megalithic sites is quite another.

By all means carry on.

At least there appear to be many sources talking about some plant able to soften stone.


The positioning of the stones is quite another thing.

But the protuberances found on many stones plus the ramps should give us a clue:  ROPES and MANPOWER.


#3999    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 8,539 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:45 PM

View Postzoser, on 03 January 2013 - 05:29 PM, said:

Archaeologists never consult specialists.  How about Chris Dunn and Roger Hopkins for a start.  Comments from these experts have been posted here recently.


What a cop-out! So you can only name 2, and both just happen to have appeared on the AA series, and BOTH are anti aliens as I pointed out way back.
You see you fall for it all the time, the questions were trick questions,  I KNEW you couldn't name any because your research only goes so far as watching a vid. And no 'specialist' worth his salt, and no archeologist wanting to keep his professional career, will ever mention aliens! And that's not to say they will think it, but never say it...they don't even think it to start with!!

Youre just swayed by videos.

The England team visited an orphanage in Brazil today. “It’s heartbreaking to see their sad little faces with no hope” .....said Jose, age 6.
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

#4000    zoser

zoser

    Sapphire

  • Member
  • 10,009 posts
  • Joined:19 Aug 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:52 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 03 January 2013 - 05:42 PM, said:

At least there appear to be many sources talking about some plant able to soften stone.


The positioning of the stones is quite another thing.

But the protuberances found on many stones plus the ramps should give us a clue:  ROPES and MANPOWER.

The protuberances are way too small to get a rope around them!  It would need half a dozen ropes to move those stones at Ollyantaytambo.

I'll post some pictures later if I get time.  The much smaller blocks have those on them too and some of them stick out less than an inch.  Their purpose definitely wasn't ropes.  Also they are not squared off enough for ropes to hold!

Posted Image


#4001    zoser

zoser

    Sapphire

  • Member
  • 10,009 posts
  • Joined:19 Aug 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 05:55 PM

View Postseeder, on 03 January 2013 - 05:45 PM, said:

What a cop-out! So you can only name 2, and both just happen to have appeared on the AA series, and BOTH are anti aliens as I pointed out way back.
You see you fall for it all the time, the questions were trick questions,  I KNEW you couldn't name any because your research only goes so far as watching a vid. And no 'specialist' worth his salt, and no archeologist wanting to keep his professional career, will ever mention aliens! And that's not to say they will think it, but never say it...they don't even think it to start with!!

Youre just swayed by videos.



Chris Dunn and Roger Hopkins isn't naming any???  I swear you are having trouble with your eyes young seeder.

Just watch an episode of AA.  PhD's everywhere; engineers particularly.

No cop out.  Information supplied and ignored.  Nothing changes there then.

You're swayed by fantasy by the way.

Edited by zoser, 03 January 2013 - 05:56 PM.

Posted Image


#4002    synchronomy

synchronomy

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,124 posts
  • Joined:05 Mar 2009

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:04 PM

View Postzoser, on 03 January 2013 - 05:55 PM, said:

Chris Dunn and Roger Hopkins isn't naming any???  I swear you are having trouble with your eyes young seeder.

Just watch an episode of AA.  PhD's everywhere; engineers particularly.

No cop out.  Information supplied and ignored.  Nothing changes there then.

You're swayed by fantasy by the way.
Go visit Georgio Tsoukalos facebook page.  The guy is no intellect.  He's a stuffed shirt.  Waste of skin IMHO. :cry:

At the heart of science is an essential balance between two seemingly contradictory attitudes--an openness to new ideas, no matter how bizarre or counterintuitive they may be, and the most ruthless skeptical scrutiny of all ideas, old and new.
This is how deep truths are winnowed from deep nonsense. -- Carl Sagan

#4003    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,065 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:15 PM

View Postzoser, on 03 January 2013 - 05:52 PM, said:

The protuberances are way too small to get a rope around them!  It would need half a dozen ropes to move those stones at Ollyantaytambo.

I'll post some pictures later if I get time.  The much smaller blocks have those on them too and some of them stick out less than an inch.  Their purpose definitely wasn't ropes.  Also they are not squared off enough for ropes to hold!

You haven't seen them from up close. You can put your arm around them.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 03 January 2013 - 06:24 PM.


#4004    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 8,539 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:16 PM

View Postzoser, on 03 January 2013 - 05:55 PM, said:

Chris Dunn and Roger Hopkins isn't naming any???  I swear you are having trouble with your eyes young seeder.

Just watch an episode of AA.  PhD's everywhere; engineers particularly.

No cop out.  Information supplied and ignored.  Nothing changes there then.

You're swayed by fantasy by the way.

Young? You have no idea. Now I assumed as you hadn't posted all day you had in fact had to go back to school..bummer eh? And it was I, yes me...who first pointed out to you the 'facts' about Dunn and Hopkins...remember when you were seriously owned?  How soon you forget, maybe I will re-post that original post as a subtle reminder

everyone else no doubt hasn't forgot

The England team visited an orphanage in Brazil today. “It’s heartbreaking to see their sad little faces with no hope” .....said Jose, age 6.
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain

#4005    seeder

seeder

    Nut Cracker

  • Member
  • 8,539 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2012

Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:17 PM

View Postseeder, on 21 December 2012 - 08:39 AM, said:

quote:  "Mr. Dunn has anticipated a valid objection to his reasoning, and it's the exact thing that I'm going to accuse him of.  It's called anomaly hunting, and I'm fairly certain that he's doing it.  But he thinks there's something more than that going on here, and he tries to explain himself.  I can respect that.

And I should be fair here and point out something that the History Channel didn't mention: Mr. Dunn is not an ancient aliens theorist.  He believes that the ancient Egyptians had more sophisticated tools than we give them credit for, but from looking through his website it seems like he believes that they came up with this technology of their own accord, rather than through alien intervention.

http://www.dumbassgu...og.php?bid=67   Knowing you, you wont bother reading the link for Mr Dunns 'section'

and "I can back it up with expert witnesses. Can you?"

Witnesses? So someone has seen aliens for real?

repost to help zosers memory along

The England team visited an orphanage in Brazil today. “It’s heartbreaking to see their sad little faces with no hope” .....said Jose, age 6.
It's not the depth of the rabbit hole that bugs me... It's all the rabbit poop you stumble over on your way down...
“It's easier to fool people - than to convince them that they have been fooled.”  Mark Twain