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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#4816    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:22 AM

I believe scurry and skelter as in helter skelter(scurry away fast) would come from this root also.

The other thing is I can see your skull as a shield, for your brain. A hard barrier.

skull
early 13c., probably from O.N. skalli "bald head, skull," a general Scandinavian word (cf. Swedish skulle, Norw. skult), probably related to O.E. scealu "husk" (see shell). But early prominence in southwestern texts suggests rather origin from a Dutch or Low Ger. cognate (e.g. Du. schol "turf, piece of ice," but the sense of "head bone framework" is wanting). Derivation from O.Fr. escuelle seems unlikely on grounds of sound and sense. O.E. words for skull include heafod-bolla.

http://www.etymonlin....php?term=skull

Dutch (turf, piece of ice) - schol - searching for 'head bone framework' - that just what I said - a head barrier, like a shield.

What about a scally-wag, my Pop always used to call me one of those...because WAG is in the OLB, when the wag from Staveren.. a scurrying wag

Scull Shoals, Georgia USA...lol

Now, SHELL:
shell (n.)
O.E. sciell, scill, Anglian scell "seashell, eggshell," related to O.E. scealu "shell, husk," from P.Gmc. *skaljo "divide, separate" (cf. W.Fris. skyl "peel, rind," M.L.G. schelle "pod, rind, egg shell," Goth. skalja "tile"), with the notion of "covering that splits off," from PIE base *(s)kel- "to cut, cleave" (cf. O.C.S. skolika "shell," Rus. skala "bark").


SKALJO is very like SHOAL etymology of sandbar, divider, like I was saying.

Then to West Frisian it is Peel - that is really weird because that is PEL.

Then check in Old Norse what skulli is: O.N. skalli "bald head, skull

In French a bald head is a PELLE.

See, I followed Pel around everywhere before and how odd that we come back to it again with Scull, with a West Frisian element in it now.

Shoal is shell (divide, seperate P.Gmc) to W.Fr is Peel, the word SHOAL is the same as PEL. The flat. Like PLane or PLain (of water)

I can see a huge circle of words there.

I'll be back.

Edited by The Puzzler, 12 May 2011 - 03:27 AM.

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#4817    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:57 AM

This is n't where I was going but more observations:

How about Syrtis, apparently named after the shoals there, Greek being soor-tis - Syrtis of Libya.

Again, the Libyan coast is a good spot for Atlantis and now I'd think it could have been a NESOS, nose, not island as such but a kind of peninsula, made of sand banks basically, that may have been circular in shape with a possible dome in the centre - Texel has this structure and with X in the middle, maybe X just does 'mark the spot'.

Tyre is an odd mixture of these 2 words, we have Sur and Tyre.

I know Sur is rock and Tor is also rocky outcrop.

The word Tyre from Sur can only be tor imo.

What about Syrtis, syr meaning shoal.

tyr might mean shoals too, or rocky outcrop...

Could a shoal actually be also a shell outcrop?

I believe it is...like middens.

Shell middens - shoal middens.

Where shells made a barrier, like rocks, that area could actually be termed shoal. I think the millions of shells they SKALLIed, husked (peeled) of the molluscs that made the red dye heaped up quite a lot around the shores of Phoenicia.

Syria. Tyre. All named for the shoals possibly, like Syrtis.

Assur - has sur in it - rock or shoal

as - sur could be 2 words to create the name of Assur - who may have been Tyr, the Norse God. Maybe fire-rock or such - burnstone - amber.

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#4818    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:06 AM

Also now looks like pyr to me, pyramid, pyr - fire - the pyre.

This word tyr, pyr, syr tur, pur (pure, top, unmixed?), sur and all other variations are (imo) relative to a pile, either the top of or the structure, a general pile, a shell or rock barrier, a wall or pyramid, a fire barrier, shield, all barriers, sand, sandbank.

This is all shoal.

Walls of rocks, (instead of midden context) were used as barriers.

Maybe Tiryns can also be in this group.

And scull, which comes from shell - shoal - same again.

That Dido ends her life on a PYR isn't hard to then see that the TYRians in SYRtis were cremating and fire-worshippers, or more, fire mountain worshippers. A fire mountain can then be a volcano.

That's up.

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#4819    Alewyn

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:07 AM

View PostOtharus, on 10 May 2011 - 07:43 AM, said:

I advise you to just ignore the language posts if they're not your cup of tea, like I ignore most of the geology stuff, because I just don't know enough about it to discuss.


Otharus,
Sorry for my late response but these days I just do not have the time to participate here as much as I would like to.

I do believe that the investigations into the language aspect of the OLB is very important to determine its authenticity, i.e connections to the Rustringer or old West Frisian dialects, etc. What I do find irritating is that we seem to wander off in totally unrelated directions by, what Abe calls, "lego-linguistics" or word play. It is almost like giving someone a recipe for baking a cake. You tell them to add a teaspoon of salt and then end up discussing salt mining. Whilst the mining of salt could be very interesting, it will not influence the cake at all. (btw, this remark was not directed at you)

I find your research into the 19th century investigation of the existance of the OLB very interesting. What is the earliest confirmed date that people knew about the existance of the book? Was it in the 1940's or 1930's?
Jensma's view that this was another old book (now lost), is so lame, and in fact, pathetic that it should be rejected by anyone with a bit of sense. Yet, because he is a professor people actually believe him. Imagine that. They had an old book which they threw away and then created a totally "new" old book.

Abe wants "hard" evidence. What can be harder than facts in the OLB that was not known in the 19th century - such as the description of the 4.2ka BP event? That description was only discovered in the 20th century. Add to that my list of 20 events that occured in 4200 BC (Post # 4653). Cormac remarked that there is no reason to believe that they all happened simultaneously. Now imagine that each land had its own indepenent event: Overcast skies, no wind, earthquakes, floods, drought, famine, meteorite activities, civilization collapse, etc. So while all this happened in one country, the rest just carried on normally untill their seperate turns came? How logical is that?

Btw. Abe, I believe somebody found an old tombstone in the Netherlands with the inscription : "Tread softly for here lies Adela, 590 BC - 530 BC" (joke)


#4820    cormac mac airt

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:23 AM

Quote

Cormac remarked that there is no reason to believe that they all happened simultaneously.

No, that's NOT what I said either. I've posted about several events that were happening in and around that general point in time. What I have said REPEATEDLY is that there is no evidence that can be pinned to the 2193/2194 BC date SPECIFICALLY like you have claimed several times. There STILL remains no evidence that corroborates that specific date, whether from the OLB or your own personal claims/misinterpretations of fact, which Swede and I both mentioned somewhere back around Page 9 or so, IIRC.

cormac

Edited by cormac mac airt, 12 May 2011 - 06:00 AM.

The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#4821    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 05:23 AM

lol This one is just for you Alewyn.

Or should I say Sir.

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#4822    Knul

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 06:43 AM

For those who are interested in the word foddik = lamp, there is breaking news on my website: www.rodinbook.nl.

http://webc.rodinboo...ile=foddik.html


#4823    The Puzzler

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 07:40 AM

View Postchenyixiu, on 12 May 2011 - 06:21 AM, said:

Today very happy to enter this BBS, I am a novice, into this BBS is fate, hope everybody very much care, have what problem everybody together discuss from it. Hehe... Thank you.





microsoft office 2010
office 2007
Hi, what is BBS?

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#4824    Abramelin

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 09:27 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 12 May 2011 - 07:40 AM, said:

Hi, what is BBS?

It's spam and BBS is Bulletin Board Site.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 12 May 2011 - 09:27 AM.


#4825    Abramelin

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 09:29 AM

View PostKnul, on 12 May 2011 - 06:43 AM, said:

For those who are interested in the word foddik = lamp, there is breaking news on my website: www.rodinbook.nl.

http://webc.rodinboo...ile=foddik.html

Hi Menno, I think you posted the wrong link... it's the page where you, as administrator of that webpage must login. We can't.

Maybe you mean this one?

http://rodinbook.nl/foddik.html

.

Edited by Abramelin, 12 May 2011 - 09:31 AM.


#4826    Abramelin

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 09:35 AM

View PostAlewyn, on 12 May 2011 - 05:07 AM, said:

Otharus,
Sorry for my late response but these days I just do not have the time to participate here as much as I would like to.

I do believe that the investigations into the language aspect of the OLB is very important to determine its authenticity, i.e connections to the Rustringer or old West Frisian dialects, etc. What I do find irritating is that we seem to wander off in totally unrelated directions by, what Abe calls, "lego-linguistics" or word play. It is almost like giving someone a recipe for baking a cake. You tell them to add a teaspoon of salt and then end up discussing salt mining. Whilst the mining of salt could be very interesting, it will not influence the cake at all. (btw, this remark was not directed at you)

I find your research into the 19th century investigation of the existance of the OLB very interesting. What is the earliest confirmed date that people knew about the existance of the book? Was it in the 1940's or 1930's?
Jensma's view that this was another old book (now lost), is so lame, and in fact, pathetic that it should be rejected by anyone with a bit of sense. Yet, because he is a professor people actually believe him. Imagine that. They had an old book which they threw away and then created a totally "new" old book.

Abe wants "hard" evidence. What can be harder than facts in the OLB that was not known in the 19th century - such as the description of the 4.2ka BP event? That description was only discovered in the 20th century. Add to that my list of 20 events that occured in 4200 BC (Post # 4653). Cormac remarked that there is no reason to believe that they all happened simultaneously. Now imagine that each land had its own indepenent event: Overcast skies, no wind, earthquakes, floods, drought, famine, meteorite activities, civilization collapse, etc. So while all this happened in one country, the rest just carried on normally untill their seperate turns came? How logical is that?

Btw. Abe, I believe somebody found an old tombstone in the Netherlands with the inscription : "Tread softly for here lies Adela, 590 BC - 530 BC" (joke)

I guess you meant "1840's or 1830's" ??

--

"Hard evidence", yes, hard evidence, that everything described happened in Frya's Empire, which was ancient Europe, and that it all happened at 2194BC.

--

Yes, thanks, it took me a week to make that tombstone look authentic, lol.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 12 May 2011 - 09:36 AM.


#4827    Abramelin

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 09:42 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 12 May 2011 - 03:22 AM, said:


I can see a huge circle of words there.

I'll be back.


I was afraid you were going to say that, LOL !!

But Puzz, can you tell me what you are trying to prove here? I lost track again...


#4828    Knul

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 10:04 AM

Yes,
http://rodinbook.nl/foddik.html


#4829    Abramelin

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 10:08 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 11 May 2011 - 09:07 PM, said:

Sigh... I have searched for many hours in online German records about (storm) floods at the Nordsee coast during the middle ages, but found nothing happening at 1255.

So all one of us has to do is go to Leeuwarden, and search through old chonicles/records, and hope to find something about a flood or , "überschwemmung", occurring in 1255 AD.

========

And something else: does anyone know the etymology of the name of the "Jade River", the stream that ran east of Rüstringen and flooded it many times???

I will bet it has nothing to do with the gem with the same name (just to prevent another 'etymology' outburst, lol)...


.

I should not have asked it for no one else but ME (see my subtitle) found the answer, lol:

jade (2)
"worn-out horse," late 14c., possibly from O.N. jalda "mare," from Finno-Ugric (cf. Mordvin al'd'a "mare"). As a term of abuse for a woman, it dates from 1550s.

http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=jade



jaded: Made dull, apathetic, tired, or cynical by experience. From Old Norse “jalda”=worn-out mare.

jaded: Worn out, tired, and weary of life. Unenthusiastic and insensitive. From Old Norse “jalda”=mare. Literally “like an old horse.”

http://etyman.wordpr.../tweetionary/j/

-


■booze: To drink alcohol in large quantities. Middle Englsh "bouse" < Middle Dutch "busen"= to drink to excess.

http://webcache.goog...e=www.google.nl

L. 156. — Bouse or booze (and always so pronounced)
perh. from Du busen, from buise — a drinking-cup. To
drink deeply.
A "bousening well" was one in which
people were drenched as a cure.


http://www.archive.o...289073_djvu.txt


So... the Jadebusen is German for the Jade Bay, but I thought the German for bay was 'haff'. [EDIT: wrong, the German word for bay is 'Bucht'. Haff is the German word for lagoon]

Jadebusen: "Worn out old mare drinking to excess"... (try to picture that in your mind's eye)

:w00t:

.

Edited by Abramelin, 12 May 2011 - 10:20 AM.


#4830    Abramelin

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 11:07 AM

I think a couple of pictures would do nice here (they are not from Alewyn's book, btw), especially for those who just started reading this huge thread:


Posted Image

Posted Image

More here: http://www.earth-his...inda-plates.htm