Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

When do you think we wil set foot on mars?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1    spikeman25

spikeman25

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 479 posts
  • Joined:31 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:godfrey, Illinois

Posted 22 July 2007 - 05:58 AM

I've got a strong feeling it won't be in my lifetime.


#2    oldie

oldie

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 176 posts
  • Joined:26 Feb 2006

Posted 22 July 2007 - 06:55 AM

Probably not in the distant future. I would say fifty years.



#3    spikeman25

spikeman25

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 479 posts
  • Joined:31 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:godfrey, Illinois

Posted 22 July 2007 - 07:13 AM

Quote

Probably not in the distant future. I would say fifty years.
That's what i think. I'll be an old man by then.



#4    Ins0mniac

Ins0mniac

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,106 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tassie, Australia

Posted 22 July 2007 - 12:34 PM

I think it's mostly a matter of funding. If enough money was put into it by governments, I don't think the technology part would be too hard to manage.

We just need to wait until it becomes a good thing to do politically. Either that or wait for the private industry to take over. Whichever comes first.

I think it will happen within a few decades.

"In the beginning, the universe was created. This made a lot of people very angry, and has been widely regarded as a bad idea." - Douglas Adams

#5    Sgt._Love

Sgt._Love

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 393 posts
  • Joined:18 Jul 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Urbana Illinois

  • "We are not retreating - we are advancing in another Direction." (stevewinn)

Posted 22 July 2007 - 12:43 PM

in 70 years lol

"The day Soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence in you or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership." (Powell, 1995)  
Cdt. Pfc. Lovekamp 3rd Squad 2nd Platoon 1st Company Fighting Illini Battalion 10th Brigade

#6    Enigma wrapped in a puzzle

Enigma wrapped in a puzzle

    Astral Projection

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 709 posts
  • Joined:26 Nov 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Everywhere and nowhere

Posted 22 July 2007 - 07:16 PM

Well I would say since we did so many "succesfull apollo missions"  then why not sooner.   We have way better technology now and if you look at what they supposadly did back in the 60's with apollo,  I would say we have a better chance of making a succesfull mission to mars today than when we went to the moon.   So I say mabee 10 to 20 years hopefully.   I bet we will have to wait and see how the next moon landing goes first......

Formerly known as Damon2000

#7    MID

MID

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 14,490 posts
  • Joined:06 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Male

  • ...The greatest error is not to have tried and failed, but that in trying, we did not give it our best effort.

Posted 22 July 2007 - 07:44 PM

Quote

Well I would say since we did so many "succesfull apollo missions"  then why not sooner.   We have way better technology now and if you look at what they supposadly did back in the 60's with apollo,  I would say we have a better chance of making a succesfull mission to mars today than when we went to the moon.   So I say mabee 10 to 20 years hopefully.   I bet we will have to wait and see how the next moon landing goes first......



We didn't "supposedly" do it in the 1960s.  We actually did do it.


However, social emphases and a progressively inept congressional body have, until recently, prohibited further manned space exploration efforts in the United States.   Thanks to President Bush, we now have a mandate to return to exploration, and are in the process of developing the spacecraft and systems necessary to return us to the Moon, and to develop systems which will lead to the exploration of Mars by men in the future.

It will likely be anothter 13 to 15 years before we return to the lunar surface with the Constellation program.  After that, perhaps a couple decades before we make it to the surface of Mars.  There is a massive amount of work to be done before such a mission can be attempted.  Were probably talking 2040 or so before a Manned Mars exploration takes place.





#8    Sneferu

Sneferu

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 16 posts
  • Joined:07 Jul 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Desert

Posted 22 July 2007 - 08:23 PM

Yeah depending on circumstances, probably 40-60 years.


#9    Pilot28

Pilot28

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 56 posts
  • Joined:22 Aug 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pensalvania USA.

  • My species is incapable of space flight on our own. This is the trade off we make for the chance to see the galaxy

Posted 22 July 2007 - 09:38 PM

I agree with what everybody else is saying. A few decades before we get a manned mission to mars. I think it'll be a good thing for us to go there. But however I doubt we'll land anywhere of any real interest. Like the Sydonya Plane where the face on mars and the Pyramids are. No we'll probably land near a crater of something and examine that stuff.

Posted Image

I always hope for the best. Experience, unfortunately, has taught me to expect the worst.
                         -Garok.

#10    Sgt._Love

Sgt._Love

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 393 posts
  • Joined:18 Jul 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Urbana Illinois

  • "We are not retreating - we are advancing in another Direction." (stevewinn)

Posted 22 July 2007 - 10:16 PM

Rethought it probably not for 50 years

"The day Soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence in you or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership." (Powell, 1995)  
Cdt. Pfc. Lovekamp 3rd Squad 2nd Platoon 1st Company Fighting Illini Battalion 10th Brigade

#11    MID

MID

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 14,490 posts
  • Joined:06 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Male

  • ...The greatest error is not to have tried and failed, but that in trying, we did not give it our best effort.

Posted 22 July 2007 - 11:43 PM

Quote

I agree with what everybody else is saying. A few decades before we get a manned mission to mars. I think it'll be a good thing for us to go there. But however I doubt we'll land anywhere of any real interest. Like the Sydonya Plane where the face on mars and the Pyramids are. No we'll probably land near a crater of something and examine that stuff.



Pilot....


All of Mars is of interest.  Anywhere on its surface will be fine for Man's first visit, and wherever that it, it'll be of extreme interest.


p.s., there is no "face" on Mars.


#12    spikeman25

spikeman25

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 479 posts
  • Joined:31 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:godfrey, Illinois

Posted 23 July 2007 - 12:24 AM

Quote

Pilot....
All of Mars is of interest.  Anywhere on its surface will be fine for Man's first visit, and wherever that it, it'll be of extreme interest.
p.s., there is no "face" on Mars.
Or pyramids for that matter.



#13    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

    Space Cadet

  • 30,955 posts
  • Joined:03 Mar 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bexleyheath, Kent, UK

  • We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

    Oscar Wilde

Posted 23 July 2007 - 12:27 AM

Quote

Pilot....
All of Mars is of interest.  Anywhere on its surface will be fine for Man's first visit, and wherever that it, it'll be of extreme interest.

That's pretty much what I was going to say. How can anywhere on another planet not be interesting? How can a small planet with a 15 mile high volcano which posses a valley system that would stretch from the east coast to the west coast of the United States and where it can snow carbon dioxide at the poles not be interesting?


Quote

p.s., there is no "face" on Mars.

Nor pyramids nor indeed a place called Sydonya (close but no cigar, it's Cydonia). There is enough discussion on these objects in the Extraterrestrial Life & The UFO Phenomenon forum, and detailed discussion here would be taking the subject of topic. Suffice to say that there is absolutely no scientific evidence to support artificial structures on Mars and plenty to support these interesting features being natural.

As to the question asked, when we set foot on Mars is really dependent on two things; budget and political will. As political will is responsible for the budget available I suppose it could be argued that it is the only thing holding us back.

Much of the technology required already exists. A manned spacecraft to Mars will be a large vehicle (some believe as big as the ISS). We have the ability to build such a vehicle now. With the new Ares V launch vehicle which will be built for the return to the moon it will be even easier to construct large spacecraft in earth orbit.

There is more research needed in protecting astronauts from exposure to radiation in deep space, which due to the length of the mission (several months each way) will be a much MUCH bigger threat than it ever was with Apollo. In particular the threat from solar storms and Coronal Mass Ejections will need to be addressed. Due to the short period that Apollo spent outside the Van Allen belts the chances of a mission being hit by such an event was low. For a Mars mission it is almost a certainty. Without protection such an event could incapacitate or kill a crew.

We also have no experience of long term survival on another world. A mission to Mars will have almost certainly involve a stay on the surface of weeks or months. NASA's planned  Moon base will provide such experience.

We also have experience of long term exposure to zero G (some of the Soviet Cosmonauts spent periods of greater than a year in orbit). What we have no knowledge of is experience with reduced G. This is something else that the moon base will teach us.

So really what is holding us back is experience not knowledge. Once that is gained we will be ready to go if the budget is available. That budget depends on the governments of the space-faring nations.

I am slightly more optimistic than some. I think, if the will to do it is there, we could see the first human boot prints on Mars within 20-25 years.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

Posted Image
Click on button

#14    . Alexandros .

. Alexandros .

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Closed
  • Pip
  • 192 posts
  • Joined:30 Jun 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia

Posted 23 July 2007 - 01:13 AM

Lol, i think we have already set foot on Mars. there just keeping it confidential from us.

Different subject-Has Mars got Air inside its atmosphere?


#15    MID

MID

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 14,490 posts
  • Joined:06 Aug 2005
  • Gender:Male

  • ...The greatest error is not to have tried and failed, but that in trying, we did not give it our best effort.

Posted 23 July 2007 - 01:55 AM

Quote

Lol, i think we have already set foot on Mars. there just keeping it confidential from us.

Different subject-Has Mars got Air inside its atmosphere?




"Air", which is what we call our atmosphere, is made up of different gases (nitrogen (78%), oxygen (21%), Carbon dioxide, argon, and other gasses (1%)).  

The atmosphere of Mars  is composed of about 95% carbon dioxide, about 2.5-3.0% nitrogen, maybe 1% argon, and a wee bit of oxygen.


Components of Earth's atmosphere, or air, make up the Mars atmosphere as well.   But "air", per-se (the exact mixture of gasses we have) is not to be found on Mars.

Even if it was "air" covering Mars, it's only about .007 Atmospheres of pressure, which isn't anywhere close to something which could sustain human life, or liquid water (Mars' atmosphere is about as thin as ours is at 90,000-95,000 feet, which means it's deadly, whatever it's made of!).







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users