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Clearest pictures yet of Galaxy


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11 replies to this topic

#1    Bogeyman

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 11:05 AM

Scientists have found a way to remove the haze caused by the Earths atmosphere when photographing the Galaxy.......
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6975961.stm


#2    magnetar

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:24 PM

That is an interesting article about Palomar. One thing the Hubble can do better though, is point for a longer period of time at a faint and distant source. Telescopes on the rotating Earth, focused on one target, are limited to viewing hours, and the horizon.


#3    magnetar

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 12:46 PM

There is an article about the Nordic 100 in. telescope, which was fitted with the Lucky imaging system before the Palomar 200 in. They seem to be interested in resolving close binaries.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4456988.stm

Edited by magnetar, 04 September 2007 - 12:48 PM.


#4    leadbelly

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 10:19 PM

This is not any bearing on the telescopes, their capacities, or the research, etc. But, just out of curiosity.


linked-image


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"The 11-day STS-125  mission scheduled for launch on September 11, 2008, will install fresh batteries, replace all gyroscopes, and install Wide field camera 3 and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph."

I think I heard $500 million. Where could we come up with that kind of change?  whistling2.gif






#5    ?uestPeace

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Posted 04 September 2007 - 10:22 PM

Quote

Scientists have found a way to remove the haze caused by the Earths atmosphere when photographing the Galaxy.......
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6975961.stm


Very interesting article.. Thanks for posting

Posted Image

#6    LordBishop

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 09:29 AM

I would like to know why the image of this nebula has not changed, or has it?  All the images I've seen over the years, old and new, look the same.  If that nebula was created by a star exploding, wouldn't the shape change?  I know that it exploded possibly millions of years ago, but still, we're seeing the image as it was when it blew - but with each passing moment (days, months, years), it should be expanding, right?  The image should change.

150 Years
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#7    leadbelly

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 01:50 PM

I found an image by the Nordic Telescope, and they claim the deepest view of NGC 6543. In any regards-

Here is a widefield of the nebula. The star of course, is a white dwarf. The nebula has a series of concentric shells, which puffed off as it reached heat and size instability. Some jet-like fountains of material (with the characteristic finger comets), swilred off the poles of the star. The white dwarf, if it is a binary, could go on to more exciting things.

Nordic Telescope- 2004

linked-image




#8    leadbelly

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 02:09 PM

Of course, this is a rather evolved state for the nebula. We won't easily notice changes, right away. There are a few good papers, but they describe incremental and estimated changes based on astrophysics.

HST-

linked-image




#9    leadbelly

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 02:31 PM

Astronomers generally use filters for specific isotopes, or wavelengths, when producing an image. The rest of the time, they acquire spectral profiles on their targets. These images are built from various filters (hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, etc).

Old red giant stars tend to have layers with specific elements. As their surface expands and cools, molecules form. Those can take on new compounds as the UV from the more exposed interior adds energy to the departing streams (solar wind) of dust and other compounds, mostly in the earlier phases.

linked-image

Edited by leadbelly, 09 September 2007 - 02:32 PM.


#10    leadbelly

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 02:36 PM

linked-image


#11    Legatus Legionis

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 03:25 PM

well i've got to hand it to them.. that's a clear picture alright.


#12    Skim Milky

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Posted 10 September 2007 - 12:21 AM

wow, thats amazing stuff.  god truly is an artist.





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