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The history of Halloween


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 10:28 AM


Halloween's origins date back more than 2,000 years. On what we consider November 1, Europe's Celtic peoples celebrated their New Year's Day, called Samhain (SAH-win). The night before Samhain—what we know as Halloween—spirits were thought to walk the Earth as they traveled to the afterlife.

Fairies, demons, and other creatures were also said to be abroad.

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#2    PhoenixBird88

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 02:27 PM

Seems as though everything has been modified by the Christians. Im thankful for the separation of church and state.


#3    Siara

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 06:18 PM

UM-Bot on Oct 31 2008, 11:28 AM, said:

linked-imageHalloween's origins date back more than 2,000 years. On what we consider November 1, Europe's Celtic peoples celebrated their New Year's Day, called Samhain (SAH-win). The night before Samhain—what we know as Halloween—spirits were thought to walk the Earth


Actually the Celts, like the Jews, believed that the new day started at sunset.  The after sunset part of 10/31 ("Halloween") and the before sunset part of 11/1 ("All Saints Day") were considered one date.  This doesn't have much to do with anything-- it's just interesting to see the same tradition (the day starts at sunset) in two unrelated cultures.



#4    idontcare

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 08:30 PM

Is that why people say "put the horror back in Halloweeen"? Or is that because costumes and decorative items have become so corny? There's better places than Wal-mart to buy Halloween gear I'm sure.

Anyway, I heard something like on Halloween it's easier to talk to the dead. I'm gonna try it and probably be sorry lol. cool.gif


#5    BaneSilvermoon

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 08:13 PM

Siara on Oct 31 2008, 01:18 PM, said:

Actually the Celts, like the Jews, believed that the new day started at sunset.  The after sunset part of 10/31 ("Halloween") and the before sunset part of 11/1 ("All Saints Day") were considered one date.  This doesn't have much to do with anything-- it's just interesting to see the same tradition (the day starts at sunset) in two unrelated cultures.


Makes more sense than the current calendar system we work with. We wouldn't need daylight savings time under that system.

Course my alarm clock wouldn't work very well either I guess... nevermind... that's a horrible idea...

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#6    Wyvernkeeper

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 10:34 PM

Siara on Oct 31 2008, 06:18 PM, said:

Actually the Celts, like the Jews, believed that the new day started at sunset.  The after sunset part of 10/31 ("Halloween") and the before sunset part of 11/1 ("All Saints Day") were considered one date.  This doesn't have much to do with anything-- it's just interesting to see the same tradition (the day starts at sunset) in two unrelated cultures.


I am half Celtic (welsh) and the other half Jewish, I do not know why the Celts chose to divide the day by evenings but I believe the reason it occurs in Judaism is because of the repeated analogue in Bereshit (genesis,) ie.  'and it was evening and it was morning, the first day etc.'  Evening, precedes morning...


#7    Moonspectre

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Posted 15 July 2010 - 09:16 PM

I myself being a Celtic-Wiccan and into traditionalism, Well my true new year is upon the Thirty-First of October. However I still celebrate christmas and the gregorian calendar new year. I like a mix of multi-culture, We should all co-exist in harmony. Sadly most people nowdays are full of hate and anger, Too much wars and not enough peace...





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