Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Kerguelen, the microcontinent that was...


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#1    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,180 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 17 June 2009 - 06:37 PM

Kerguelen, the microcontinent that was...

[Ocean Drilling Program Leg 183 to the Kerguelen Plateau]

IN THE REMOTE southern Indian Ocean, straddling the Antarctic Polar Front, lies a mostly submarine plateau one-third the size of the contiguous United States. The Kerguelen Plateau is one example of a unique type of Earth feature, a large igneous province (LIP). One of the least understood features in the ocean basins, LIPs are believed to be the surface manifestations of massive pulses of volcanism that originated deep within Earth's mantle in association with narrow upwelling systems, known as mantle plumes or hotspots. The episodic nature of LIP eruptions documented in the geologic record, especially between 150 and 50 million years ago, is evidence that a more dynamic, unpredictable mode of mantle circulation, very different from that driving present-day plate motions, existed during Earth's past. LIPs preserve a record of mantle dynamics and may have also affected the Earth's environment in the past by potentially altering ocean circulation, climate conditions and sea level.

linked-image

linked-image

(...)
RESULTS. Surprising evidence recovered on Leg 183 revealed that the Kerguelen plateau had existed as a large landmass above sea level at three different times during an 80 million year period, before finally become submerged about 20 million years ago. The evidence consists of dark brown sediment overlying subaerially erupted lava flows, charcoal and wood fragments in sediments overlying igneous rocks, and conglomerates, which formed from sediments deposited in river beds, interlayered with lava flows. The final stage of volcanism forming the Kerguelen LIP produced magmas rich with gases such as carbon dioxide, oxides of sulfur, and water vapor, which may have caused global environmental change.


A link to a LARGE map : http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/comm...-Topography.jpg


---


Kerguelen continent
The Kerguelen Plateau was formed starting 110 million years ago from a series of large volcanic eruptions. The presence of soil layers in the basalt with included charcoal and conglomerate fragments of gneiss indicate that much of the plateau was above sea level as what is termed a microcontinent for three periods between 100 million years ago and 20 million years ago.


The so-called Kerguelen continent might have had tropical flora and fauna about 50 million years ago. The Kerguelen continent finally sank 20 million years ago and is now 1 2 km below sea level. It has sedimentary rocks similar to the ones found in Australia and India, suggesting they were once connected.

http://www.answers.com/topic/kerguelen-plateau




http://www.largeigneousprovinces.org/07apr.html
http://www.ig.utexas.edu/research/projects...g183/leg183.htm



And here it comes (lol) :

Could we eventually uncover a lost civilization on the sunken Kerguelen continent? And if so, what might have been its fate?
By around 110 million BC the first portions of the Kerguelen island continent had appeared. Large portions of the island continent would remain dry land for millions of years, after which they would all eventually submerge to become one with the sea floor again (with the last disappearing from the surface around 20,000,000 BC). This article lists some developments possibly relevant to the Kerguelen island continent, and any intelligent lifeforms which may have arisen or taken refuge there.



http://www.jmooneyham.com/lost-civilization-kerguelen.html

Have fun... a far older "Atlantis"..

Don't worry, it's nothing but science fiction.

It's just a possiblitiy, a civilization whiped out by time, a long time. No remnants will be discovered for the strong sea currents in that area will have whiped out anything that might give us a clue. These same currents will have flushed the top soil, and only leave an ancient, 24 millions year old rock bottom, the bootom they took samples of.

Great , eh?

-

From Monsters and Critics.com

Science News
Mini-continent once joined to India discovered in ocean
By DPA
May 4, 2007, 22:03 GMT




Bremerhaven, Germany - A mini-continent which was formerly joined to India has been discovered deep under the southern oceans by the world's most powerful ice research vessel, German scientists said Friday.

They spoke as the ship, the Polarstern, was due to dock Saturday in its home port of Bremerhaven, Germany after a 19-month research voyage to Antarctica.

The ninth phase of the voyage was a study of the undersea Kerguelen Plateau, which was orphaned after the ancient continents separated, with India drifting away from Antarctica.

The findings suggest that the Plateau, about the size of Germany and France combined, is just the tip of a bigger piece of lost continental crust.

Geophysicists did seismic and magnetic surveys to explore the gap between the little-understood plateau and East Antarctica, the Alfred Wegener Institute of polar research in Bremerhaven said.

'This plateau was created by a massive volcanic eruption shortly after India and Antarctica separated about 120 million years ago to form the Indian Ocean,' said geophysicist Karsten Gohl.

'For the first time, we have been able to see how the succession of volcanic deposits at the southern side of the Kerguelen Plateau, which reach right to the Antarctic continent, mostly have continental crust underneath them.

'Our findings show that a continental fragment of a size hitherto never suspected must have existed between India and the Antarctic.'

The data will be entered into a computer simulation to study ancient ocean currents and world climate, said Gohl, who is one of two project leaders of a worldwide study of such gaps, code-named Plates and Gates.

The Polarstern also explored the melting of the Antarctic ice shelves, which may be due to rising temperatures or salinity of deep ocean water or to volcanic activity.

The ship, which has berths for 50 scientists, hosted 450 scientists from 24 nations during its 84,000-nautical-mile voyage.

It can operate in temperatures 50 degrees below Celsius and steam without stopping through 150-centimetre ice.


2007 dpa - Deutsche Presse-Agentur

Copyright 2007 by monstersandcritics.com.
This notice cannot be removed without permission.

====


What is a Submerged Continent?
Question and Answer: What is a Submerged Continent?




The term "submerged continent" is most often heard in association with the legendary lands of Atlantis or Mu. Atlantis and Mu never really existed, but there are a couple of real submerged continents around the world. Both are in the Southern Hemisphere. The submerged continents go by the names of Zealandia and the Kerguelen Plateau.

Zealandia is the largest of the two submerged continents, with a surface area of 3.5 million square kilometers, larger than Greenland and almost half the size of Australia. As its name suggests, the only part of the continent above water today are the islands of New Zealand. Zealandia quickly sunk when it broke off from Australia/Antarctica 83 million years ago. About 25 million years ago, Zealandia was completely underwater. Today, 93% is still underwater, with just 7% making up the New Zealand of today, which was created through tectonic action about 23 million years ago. Most of the submerged continent is less than 500 m (1,640 ft) below the surface.

Another submerged continent, far to the west, is called the Kerguelen Plateau or just Kerguelen. The continent is named after the Kerguelen islands, which along with Heard Island and the McDonald Islands are the only portions of the continent above the surface. Kerguelen is located in one of the regions of the world's oceans furthest from dry land, about 3,000 km southwest of Australia (1,864 mi) and 5,000 km (3,100 mi) south of India. Like Zealandia, Kerguelen was once part of the massive continent Gondwana, which was made up of practically all land masses in the present Southern Hemisphere. Kerguelen is smaller than Zealandia, with a surface area slightly larger than a million square kilometers, about three times the size of Japan. More than 99% of the continent is underwater.

Kerguelen began forming 110 million years ago, over the Kerguelen hotspot. Between 100 million years ago and 20 million years ago, the continent was above sea level three times, and may have had tropical flora and fauna 50 million years ago. Because of its size, Kerguelen is called a microcontinent. Kerguelen sank 20 million years ago and now lies 1-2 km (0.6 - 1.2 mi) below the ocean.

http://www.thewhatis.com/20553-What-is-a-S...d-Continent.php

Edited by Abramelin, 17 June 2009 - 07:04 PM.


#2    Emma_Acid

Emma_Acid

    Alien Abducter

  • Member
  • 5,099 posts
  • Joined:29 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Posted 17 June 2009 - 07:27 PM

Given that it sank 18 million years before humans emerged, I'll have to go with a simple "no".

Science isn’t about truth and falsity, it’s about reducing uncertainty ~ Brian Nosek

#3    555soul

555soul

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 251 posts
  • Joined:14 Jun 2009

Posted 17 June 2009 - 07:59 PM

Cool

The common man has common sense, the exceptional man has exceptional sense.

#4    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,180 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 17 June 2009 - 08:01 PM

Heh, you didn't read the science fiction part, and that's the biggest part in fact. It talks about the emergence of another intelligent race, many millions of years before our ancestors dropped from their trees.

And, I said "Atlantis" as a name for 'a' submerged continent with some kind of advanced civilization, not as Plato's Atlantis.

Hey, the mini-continent did exist, no doubt about that amongst scientists. What happened on that mini-continent while it was above water, that's another story. And because it is now too deep under the waves to research it well, anything, any fantasy is possible, right?

Edited by Abramelin, 17 June 2009 - 08:04 PM.


#5    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,180 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 17 June 2009 - 09:04 PM

Btw, the last post was a reply to Emma. For God knows what reason I am not allowed to edit my own post.

--

Ah, ok, there is a limit to the time to edit a post, ok.

Well, this is a post about a REAL submerged continent. No bs. Where are you all??

Edited by Abramelin, 17 June 2009 - 09:08 PM.


#6    greggK

greggK

    Poltergeist

  • Member
  • 2,756 posts
  • Joined:14 Jan 2007
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:alabama, USA

Posted 17 June 2009 - 10:27 PM

Abramelin on Jun 17 2009, 04:04 PM, said:

Btw, the last post was a reply to Emma. For God knows what reason I am not allowed to edit my own post.

--

Ah, ok, there is a limit to the time to edit a post, ok.

Well, this is a post about a REAL submerged continent. No bs. Where are you all??


I stopped by here because the name is catchy; Kerguelen.  Sort of just rolls off the tongue.  Ker Gue Len.  Nice roll.  But, think about it!  Whatever remnants are there, have been under that freezing-cold water for how many years?  Where did thy fellows find the baby frozen elephant or whatever that was?

Edited by greggK, 17 June 2009 - 10:28 PM.

It is me!

#7    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,180 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 17 June 2009 - 10:57 PM

greggK on Jun 18 2009, 12:27 AM, said:

I stopped by here because the name is catchy; Kerguelen. Sort of just rolls off the tongue. Ker Gue Len. Nice roll. But, think about it! Whatever remnants are there, have been under that freezing-cold water for how many years? Where did thy fellows find the baby frozen elephant or whatever that was?


Don't forget: the area is under a mile or more sea. Then there are the very strong currents that will whipe the board clean.

The baby mammoth was found on land, in permafrost.

Edited by Abramelin, 17 June 2009 - 10:59 PM.


#8    cormac mac airt

cormac mac airt

    Non-Corporeal Being

  • Member
  • 8,159 posts
  • Joined:18 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tennessee, USA

Posted 17 June 2009 - 11:23 PM

Hello Abramelin,

Quote

And, I said "Atlantis" as a name for 'a' submerged continent with some kind of advanced civilization, not as Plato's Atlantis.


I'm going to assume you're not using the name Atlantis for the same reason most fringe theorists use it. That is, to be able to come back to it at some point and claim, "See, I told you it's Plato's Atlantis", or some such. It's been my experience that Atlantis is only used by fringe theorists as a "catch-all" phrase.

As I don't know much about such areas as the Kerguelen Plateau, although it is interesting, does it actually meet whatever requirements there are to be called either a continent or a micro-continent? I was under the impression that being of a basaltic origin, that that would preclude the use of such terms. Although I could be wrong.

cormac


The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#9    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,180 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 17 June 2009 - 11:51 PM

cormac mac airt on Jun 18 2009, 01:23 AM, said:

Hello Abramelin,



I'm going to assume you're not using the name Atlantis for the same reason most fringe theorists use it. That is, to be able to come back to it at some point and claim, "See, I told you it's Plato's Atlantis", or some such. It's been my experience that Atlantis is only used by fringe theorists as a "catch-all" phrase.

As I don't know much about such areas as the Kerguelen Plateau, although it is interesting, does it actually meet whatever requirements there are to be called either a continent or a micro-continent? I was under the impression that being of a basaltic origin, that that would preclude the use of such terms. Although I could be wrong.

cormac



I said why I used the name "Atlantis", right?

I am very well aware of the fact that the Kerguelen Plateau, or the Kerguelen Large Igneous Province (according to one of the links I posted in my intial post here) as it is called officially, is not a real continent.


Use your fantasy: I did not claim to have found the 'one and only true Atlantis', it's just a subermerged area that was large enough to be considered a mini continent. It submerged for the last time 24 million years ago, so anything could have lived there. Even a civilization created by non-humans. And that is all there is to it.

And we will never know for sure what was possible; anything that could possibly have lived there, even some kind of civilization, has been whiped clean in time.


#10    cormac mac airt

cormac mac airt

    Non-Corporeal Being

  • Member
  • 8,159 posts
  • Joined:18 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tennessee, USA

Posted 18 June 2009 - 12:13 AM

Sorry I interrupted your fantasy. Carry on.

cormac


The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. It shall be the ancient city of Athens, and we will suppose that the citizens whom you imagined, were our veritable ancestors, of whom the priest spoke; they will perfectly harmonise, and there will be no inconsistency in saying that the citizens of your republic are these ancient Athenians. --  Plato's Timaeus

#11    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 23,867 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 18 June 2009 - 12:20 AM

Looks like it would have been very cold. Maybe they should do underwater radar mapping looking for the Island of R'lyeh where Great Cthulhu sleeps.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#12    drakonwick

drakonwick

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 4,198 posts
  • Joined:15 Jan 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Battlefield Earth

  • There is no need for temples; no need for complicated philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness.

Posted 18 June 2009 - 12:48 AM

Interesting read! But, taking into consideration that the massive island is the result of massive volcanic upheavals, I am quite sure that
Kerguelen may have took hundreds of thousands, if not millions of years to be created by this vulcanism. The chance of any life forms
existing on this island could be considerably slim.

Quote

Kerguelen plateau had existed as a large landmass above sea level at three different times during an 80 million year period, before finally become submerged about 20 million years ago.

This is another good reason why it would be hard for most life forms to live on this island.

I remember the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another." - J. Robert Oppenheimer.

#13    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,180 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 18 June 2009 - 03:29 AM

Moro Bumbleroot on Jun 18 2009, 02:48 AM, said:

Interesting read! But, taking into consideration that the massive island is the result of massive volcanic upheavals, I am quite sure that
Kerguelen may have took hundreds of thousands, if not millions of years to be created by this vulcanism. The chance of any life forms
existing on this island could be considerably slim.


This is another good reason why it would be hard for most life forms to live on this island.


This is from the first post:


Kerguelen began forming 110 million years ago, over the Kerguelen hotspot. Between 100 million years ago and 20 million years ago, the continent was above sea level three times, and may have had tropical flora and fauna 50 million years ago. Because of its size, Kerguelen is called a microcontinent. Kerguelen sank 20 million years ago and now lies 1-2 km (0.6 - 1.2 mi) below the ocean.



And... do those lava flows scare of the people, animals and plants living on Hawaii, an island in an archipelago formed above another hotspot?

Edited by Abramelin, 18 June 2009 - 03:35 AM.


#14    drakonwick

drakonwick

    Government Agent

  • Member
  • 4,198 posts
  • Joined:15 Jan 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Battlefield Earth

  • There is no need for temples; no need for complicated philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness.

Posted 18 June 2009 - 05:45 AM

Abramelin on Jun 17 2009, 11:29 PM, said:

This is from the first post:


Kerguelen began forming 110 million years ago, over the Kerguelen hotspot. Between 100 million years ago and 20 million years ago, the continent was above sea level three times, and may have had tropical flora and fauna 50 million years ago. Because of its size, Kerguelen is called a microcontinent. Kerguelen sank 20 million years ago and now lies 1-2 km (0.6 - 1.2 mi) below the ocean.



And... do those lava flows scare of the people, animals and plants living on Hawaii, an island in an archipelago formed above another hotspot?

I suppose you have a point there! I never really thought about it like that.

I remember the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita. Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." I suppose we all thought that, one way or another." - J. Robert Oppenheimer.

#15    Leonardo

Leonardo

    Awake

  • Member
  • 18,408 posts
  • Joined:20 Oct 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

  • Hell is a guilty conscience

Posted 18 June 2009 - 07:41 AM

Abramelin on Jun 18 2009, 04:29 AM, said:

This is from the first post:


Kerguelen began forming 110 million years ago, over the Kerguelen hotspot. Between 100 million years ago and 20 million years ago, the continent was above sea level three times, and may have had tropical flora and fauna 50 million years ago. Because of its size, Kerguelen is called a microcontinent. Kerguelen sank 20 million years ago and now lies 1-2 km (0.6 - 1.2 mi) below the ocean.



And... do those lava flows scare of the people, animals and plants living on Hawaii, an island in an archipelago formed above another hotspot?


Given the Kergualen Plateau's position of relative isolation from any of the significant landmasses of past geological era's (I don't believe it was ever a part of any of the major continents) - and that it was not part of the great Southern continent of Gondwana, but a relatively recent extrusion of igneous rock, I find it unlikely that any of the major fauna of those eras would have populated the region.

Certainly the flora was present, and it is not difficult to conclude that insects were present also. In the latter part of its existence above sea level birds and perhaps some marine mammals/reptiles such as seals, tortoises/turtles, etc (or their ancestors) could also have populated regions of the plateau.

The evolution of any 'technologically intelligent' species on the Plateau would also seem unlikely as we have no precedent for the evolution of any such species apart from the hominid lineage anywhere else in the world - and the pre-hominids which evolved would not have been present on Kerguelen.

All this is contingent, of course, on Kerguelen being isolated as I believe it was. If it could be shown to have been connected to a major continent with 'higher order' organisms from which an technologically intelligent species may have evolved then the possibility might exist (however remote it would still be).

In the book of life, the answers aren't in the back. - Charlie Brown

"It is a profound and necessary truth that the deep things in science are not found because they are useful; they are found because it was possible to find them."  - J. Robert Oppenheimer; Scientific Director; The Manhattan Project

"talking bull**** is not a victimless crime" - Marina Hyde, author.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users