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Is Buddha real or just a statue?


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#16    Chauncy

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 04:12 AM

QUOTE
What is the meaning of existence??".....


Could he have meant that the meaning of existence is to appreciate the beauty of existence?

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#17    Ozmeister

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 04:19 AM

That is a small part of it, but not the most important part. The appreciation of beauty is the recognition of the importance of love in the makeup of existence.



#18    Chauncy

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 04:25 AM

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The appreciation of beauty is the recognition of the importance of love in the makeup of existence.


Makes sense, how could someone love if they don't see beauty.

There was a story I remember about a girl that asked Buddha if he was hungry or brought him food because she thought he was hungry, but what he was was spiritually hungry. Anyway I remember it being a very enlightening story.

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As long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost and science can never regress.
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#19    SilverCougar

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 04:51 AM

QUOTE (Stellar @ May 27 2004, 04:33 AM)
Right now he's almost trolling.

Almost?

He's bloody down right trolling.



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#20    Chauncy

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 05:09 AM

Here's the story I was talking about , with the girl bringing Buddha food. Seems this is where he reaches the state of enlightement called Nirvana.

Once Buddha was in a dejected mood as he did not succeed in his Yogic practices. He knew not where to go and what to do. A village girl noticed his sorrowful face. She approached him and said to him in a polite manner: "Revered sir, may I bring some food for you ? It seems you are very hungry". Gautama looked at her and said, "What is your name, my dear sister ?". The maiden answered, "Venerable sir, my name is Sujata". Gautama said, "Sujata, I am very hungry. Can you really appease my hunger ?"

The innocent Sujata did not understand Gautama. Gautama was spiritually hungry. He was thirsting to attain supreme peace and Self-realization. He wanted spiritual food. Sujata placed some food before Gautama and entreated him to take it. Gautama smiled and said, "Beloved Sujata, I am highly pleased with your kind and benevolent nature. Can this food appease my hunger ?". Sujata replied, "Yes sir, it will appease your hunger. Kindly take it now". Gautama began to eat the food underneath the shadow of a large tree, thenceforth to be called as the great 'Bo-tree' or the tree of wisdom.

Gautama sat in a meditative mood underneath the tree from early morning to sunset, with a fiery determination and an iron resolve: "Let me die. Let my body perish. Let my flesh dry up. I will not get up from this seat till I get full illumination". He plunged himself into deep meditation.

At night he entered into deep Samadhi (superconscious state) underneath that sacred Bo-tree (Pipal tree or ficus religiosa). He was tempted by Maya in a variety of ways, but he stood adamant. He did not yield to Maya's allurements and temptations. He came out victorious with full illumination. He attained Nirvana (liberation). His face shone with divine splendour and effulgence. He got up from his seat and danced in divine ecstasy for seven consecutive days and nights around the sacred Bo-tree.

Then he came to the normal plane of consciousness. His heart was filled with profound mercy and compassion. He wanted to share what he had with humanity. He traveled all over India and preached his doctrine and gospel. He became a saviour, deliverer, redeemer  http://www.sivanandadlshq.org/saints/buddha.htm

The Maya that tempted him seems to be a female personification of all earthy desires or aspirations from what I can gather. I really dig this Buddha dude he offers sound advice!!




As long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost and science can never regress.
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#21    Magikman

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 05:25 AM

Joc,

  Starting threads which incorporate deliberately denigrating titles and opening comments is inappropriate and inexcusable. You might feel justified, but you've gone beyond the limits of decency and civility by trying to make your point. While I might understand your frustration, I have little tolerance for spiteful, inflammatory behavior. There are more constructive, non-derogatory ways to express your opinion, it appears you'll need several days to ponder how to formulate them.

Additionally, Stellar, this is a warning to you to refrain from making offensive, spiteful remarks which only inflame an already volatile subject. You'd have been better served reporting the post rather than posting a sarcastic comment.

Magikman

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#22    Ozmeister

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 05:42 AM

A very interesting story, Chauncy.

A few years back, the present Pope released a Papl Bull on other religions, especially Buddhism, in which he said that the attainment of Nirvana as a core of Buddhism was wishy washy and such. It just goes to show you how much the Pope misunderstood the whole concept. Like a lot of things which Christians seem to misunderstand.


#23    Chauncy

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 05:55 AM

QUOTE
It just goes to show you how much the Pope misunderstood the whole concept.


From what I've been reading the buddhists beliefs are very intune with humanity and the world, Any person of any culture could relate with this belief.

Its funny though, alot of these beliefs if we were to take a bit from each one and live by those codes .....man....this would be a great place to live......not saying this world is so bad I want to leave, but I do want to see things get better. It seems that people wanted to see this long ago as well.

user posted image

As long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost and science can never regress.
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#24    Ozmeister

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 06:04 AM

They are......I find myself drawn to the ideas and teachings of the Buddha, although I have no want of becoming a Buddhist as such. The teachings have a very strong resonance with me. His own ideas of the nature of reality accord quite strongly with my own. However there are differences.

But his ideas of how everyone should strive to be would do this planet in good stead.



#25    Fluffybunny

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 06:14 AM

QUOTE (Ozmeister @ May 26 2004, 11:04 PM)
But his ideas of how everyone should strive to be would do this planet in good stead.

Have you ever read anything by the Dalai Lama? One of my favorite books:


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Too many people on both sides of the spectrum have fallen into this mentality that a full one half of the country are the enemy for having different beliefs...in a country based on freedom of expression. It is this infighting that allows the focus to be taken away from "we the people" being able to watch, and have control over government corruption and ineptitude that is running rampant in our leadership.

People should be working towards fixing problems, not creating them.

#26    aquatus1

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 01:16 PM

From the short time that I spent studying Buddhism (I personally find it to be the closest  to scientific as a religion can get), my favorite part is on the deities.

For instance, Buddha.  Whichever one you choose to follow and model yourself after, it is made quite clear from the beginning that you are not actually modelling yourself after the actual man, but rather after the image he portrayed.  In other words, as a Christian, I would model myself after the image of Jesus that is so popular today, not after the arab that walked in muddy streets, took a dump by the side of the road, and bathed once a week like the rest of the people.  I found it remarkably refreshing that Buddhism was quite upfront about seperating the divine myth from the real person, and choosing to follow the myth with the full knowledge that it was not the factual person, but rather the ideal they were following (did that make any sense?).


#27    Chauncy

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 03:10 PM

QUOTE
I found it remarkably refreshing that Buddhism was quite upfront about seperating the divine myth from the real person, and choosing to follow the myth with the full knowledge that it was not the factual person


I too find this refreshing, especially considering that this state of pure understanding is not only set as a goal, but is in fact obtainable by man/woman.

It doesn't say this Nirvana is easy to obtain continual attempts do in fact bring you closer.

I've been trying to find, but as of yet unable to, any reference to a judgement after death in buddhism?

As long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost and science can never regress.
Julius Robert Oppenheimer. (1904-1967)
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#28    Falco Rex

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 03:20 PM

I think that judgement after death in Buddhism is based on your actions in life. You merely get reincarnated until you achieve Nirvana. I believe that the challenges you face in your current life are a direct result of your actions in the last one.
I think though, that you can achieve ultimate failure in the quest for Nirvana and be sent to the Hells after so many failures. But I'm fairly sure that in Buddhism, Hell is not permanent and you can work your way out..
I'm by no means an expert in Buddhist belief however..


#29    Ozmeister

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 12:53 AM

QUOTE
....took a dump by the side of the road


That conjured up some rather strange imagery, with regards to Jesus tongue.gif  grin2.gif

I suppose later generations of Christians would've described the remains of said dump as "Holy S**t" grin2.gif  grin2.gif

Talking about Buddhist philosophy on living and dying, I recommend you try and buy a copy of the "Tibetan Book of Living and Dying" by Soigyal Rinpoche. It's quite a dense tome but it's exceptionally interesting reading. I'm going to re-read it and re-aquaint myself with the book's contents.
  


#30    doomgirl

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 09:36 PM

When most people think of the Buddha, they are thinking of the most famous Buddha, Siddhartha Guatama. But there have been many Buddhas throughout the ages recognized and unknown. Buddhists do not worship Buddha as a patriarchal, all-knowing entity like Christians. Rather, a Buddha can be many things to many people. A Buddha is pure Enlightenment. To realize the Buddha-nature of your own consciousness, is to realize Enlightenment.

The story of Siddhartha Guatama: Born in the sixth century B.C.E. in what is today Nepal, the Buddha was a wealthy prince of the Shakya clan. He married and had a son and lived a pampered life. His father carefully sheltered him from all misery.

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