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Should we release all we know about space ?


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#1    UM-Bot

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 11:02 AM

<strong class='bbc'>Image credit: NASA</strong>
Image credit: NASA
Three astronomers have argued that it might be a bad idea to release everything discovered about the cosmos following ESA's Planck mission in 2013 due to the unavailability of additional data once we've learned all there is to know.

"Cosmologists are doing the happy dance. The European Space Agency's Planck mission is busy surveying the cosmic microwave background, aka the "echo" of the big bang, and in 2013 will release a feast of data that promises to deliver profound new insights into the origin of the universe."

Posted Image View: Full Article | Posted Image Source: New Scientist

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#2    Render

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 03:20 PM

2013 eh...marked it on my calender

I wouldn't mind all the data being released..i think everyone has as much right to it. There shouldn't be an elite of space-knowledge.


#3    Torgo

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 03:28 PM

Why can't the astronomers just restrict the dataset on their own, in order to test hypotheses on different sections of the data?


#4    Kensei

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 11:17 PM

What they are wanting to hide is here:

Yin-Yang Symbol In Space .

Religious censorship of science data?

No thanks. We the Public paid for the data, and we want it all. Now.


#5    RamboIII

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 05:26 AM

View PostKensei, on 07 December 2009 - 11:17 PM, said:

What they are wanting to hide is here:

Yin-Yang Symbol In Space .

Religious censorship of science data?

No thanks. We the Public paid for the data, and we want it all. Now.


Lol the only reason there is a yingyang symbol is because the half of the universe we are traveling toward is being blueshifted while the half we are moving away from is being redshifted.


#6    Torgo

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 01:28 AM

They are not talking about keeping the data classified or such.  They are (rather needlessly, I think) talking about trickling the data out slowly over time so that scientists can generate hypotheses and theories about the early universe based on chunks of the data, and test these theories against other chunks of data.  I think it is a silly idea, as scientists could just as easily segment the data themselves.


#7    ROGER

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 09:58 AM

View PostTorgo, on 09 December 2009 - 01:28 AM, said:

They are not talking about keeping the data classified or such.  They are (rather needlessly, I think) talking about trickling the data out slowly over time so that scientists can generate hypotheses and theories about the early universe based on chunks of the data, and test these theories against other chunks of data.  I think it is a silly idea, as scientists could just as easily segment the data themselves.
In other words they are creating their own Job security?  :lol:

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