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In Memoriam


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#61    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 28 June 2010 - 08:57 PM

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Roy S. Estess

NASA remembers Roy Estess, former Stennis Space Center Director, who passed away on June 25, 2010. Estess had a 37-year career at NASA, which began in 1966 where he was a test engineer at NASA's Stennis Space Center, known then as the Mississippi Test Facility, and worked on the engines for the Apollo Program. In 1989, he was named center director of Stennis and served in that role until 2002. He also served as acting center director of Johnson Space Center.

In this image from 2001, Johnson Space Center Acting Director Roy Estess (right) greets the Expedition 3 and STS-108 crews during return ceremonies. Seated (from left) are Nikolai Zubov, Deputy Director for Logistics and Procurement, Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City, Russia; Expedition 3 commander Frank Culbertson; and Expedition 3 flight engineers Mikhail Tyurin and Vladimir N. Dezhurov.

Image Credit: NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia - Image of the Day Gallery

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#62    thefinalfrontier

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 03:01 PM

'Star Gazer' Jack Horkheimer dies
Posted in: Astronomy, Skywatching by Nancy Atkinson (6 Comments »)  



The host of Public Television's "Star Gazer" show, Jack Horkheimer, died on August 20, 2010. Originally called the ‘Star Hustler,’ the program ran for 30 years and Horkheimer’s craggy voice combined with his flamboyant, show-biz style made him a unique and internationally recognized pioneer in popularizing naked-eye astronomy. Horkheimer was 72 and died of a respiratory ailment, according to a spokesman for the Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium, where Horkheimer was the executive director for over 35 years.

Museum officials said Horkheimer was the “foremost commentator on all astronomy related happenings nationwide. His show reached millions of people, helping to create a love of the stars for several generations of enthusiasts."
Above is his final show. Horkheimer took advantage of the internet and made his shows available on You Tube. But the show’s original name, “Star Hustler” caused a problem when people did internet searches, as the adult magazine “Hustler” usually showed up at the top of search engines. As a result, the producers renamed the show "Star Gazer" to avoid any confusion or sending any unintended traffic Hustler’s way.
Horkheimer’s appearances on the show were always marked with his opening line, "Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers!" and his signature closing line, "Keep looking up!"





I dont think there are many who had never heard of this man, I watched him many years ago and was a weekly diet for me as a youngster.


#63    ROGER

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 12:31 AM

http://www.universet...orkheimer-dies/

The host of Public Television's "Star Gazer" show, Jack Horkheimer, died on August 20, 2010. Originally called the ‘Star Hustler,’ the program ran for 30 years and Horkheimer’s craggy voice combined with his flamboyant, show-biz style made him a unique and internationally recognized pioneer in popularizing naked-eye astronomy. Horkheimer was 72 and died of a respiratory ailment, according to a spokesman for the Miami Museum of Science and Space Transit Planetarium, where Horkheimer was the executive director for over 35 years.

Museum officials said Horkheimer was the “foremost commentator on all astronomy related happenings nationwide. His show reached millions of people, helping to create a love of the stars for several generations of enthusiasts."

Above is his final show. Horkheimer took advantage of the internet and made his shows available on You Tube. But the show’s original name, “Star Hustler” caused a problem when people did internet searches, as the adult magazine “Hustler” usually showed up at the top of search engines. As a result, the producers renamed the show "Star Gazer" to avoid any confusion or sending any unintended traffic Hustler’s way.

Horkheimer’s appearances on the show were always marked with his opening line, "Greetings, greetings, fellow star gazers!" and his signature closing line, "Keep looking up!"

Rog: U.S.  pbs watchers will indeed miss him.

We pray for one last landing/ On the planet that gave us birth/ Let us rest our eyes on the fleecy skies/ And the cool, green hills of Earth.
Robert A. Heinlein

#64    Fluffybunny

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 12:46 AM

I loved that guy...

Too many people on both sides of the spectrum have fallen into this mentality that a full one half of the country are the enemy for having different beliefs...in a country based on freedom of expression. It is this infighting that allows the focus to be taken away from "we the people" being able to watch, and have control over government corruption and ineptitude that is running rampant in our leadership.

People should be working towards fixing problems, not creating them.

#65    Paranormalcy

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 01:08 AM

I recall our family all watched him religiously when Haley's Comet was approaching and passed by, then everyone lost interest and that was the last I recall seeing of him; I wondered what had happened.

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#66    realmcutter

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 01:09 AM

View PostParanormalcy, on 29 August 2010 - 01:08 AM, said:

I recall our family all watched him religiously when Haley's Comet was approaching and passed by, then everyone lost interest and that was the last I recall seeing of him; I wondered what had happened.

yeah, we should name a comet after him one day


#67    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 07:25 AM

As thefinalfrontier posted this sad news sometime go in the "In Memoriam" thread I'm going to merge these posts with that.




View Postrealmcutter, on 29 August 2010 - 01:09 AM, said:

yeah, we should name a comet after him one day
Comet's are named after their discoverers, however asteroids can be named after anyone and indeed in 2001 the main belt asteroid Asteroid 1999 FD9 was named "11409 Horkheimer" in his honour.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#68    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 12:52 AM

Shuttle Astronaut Bill Lenoir Dies



30 August 2010

Former NASA astronaut William 'Bill' Lenoir, who flew aboard the first operational flight of space shuttle Columbia in November 1982, died on Saturday, August 28 from head injuries suffered during a bicycle accident two days earlier. He was 71. Lenoir served as a mission specialist on STS-5 which became known as the "We Deliver" mission. Two commercial communications satellites were successfully deployed from the orbiter's cargo bay. Lenoir was selected as a scientist-astronaut by NASA in August 1967. He logged more than 122 hours in space and retired from NASA in 1992.

Source: NASA Channel - YouTube

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#69    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 20 November 2010 - 11:02 AM

Brian Marsden, Eminent Astronomer and Comet/Asteroid Tracker, Dies



The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics press release is reproduced below:

Release No.: 2010-25
For Release: Thursday, November 18, 2010 12:00:00 AM EST


Brian Marsden, Eminent Astronomer and Comet/Asteroid Tracker, Dies

Cambridge, MA - Dr. Brian Geoffrey Marsden passed away today at the age of 73 following a prolonged illness. He was a Supervisory Astronomer at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and Director Emeritus of the Minor Planet Center.

"Brian was one of the most influential comet investigators of the twentieth century," said Charles Alcock, Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, "and definitely one of the most colorful!"

Dr. Marsden specialized in celestial mechanics and astrometry, collecting data on the positions of asteroids and comets and computing their orbits, often from minimal observational information. Such calculations are critical for tracking potentially Earth-threatening objects. The New York Times once described Marsden as a "Cheery Herald of Fear."

The comet prediction of which Marsden was most proud was that of the return of Comet Swift-Tuttle, which is the comet associated with the Perseid meteor shower each August. Swift-Tuttle had been discovered in 1862, and the conventional wisdom was that it would return around 1981. Marsden had a strong suspicion, however, that the 1862 comet was identical with one seen in 1737, and this assumption allowed him to predict that Swift-Tuttle would not return until late 1992. This prediction proved to be correct. This comet has the longest orbital period of all the comets whose returns have been successfully predicted.

In 1998, Marsden developed a certain amount of notoriety by suggesting that an object called 1997 XF11 could collide with Earth. He said that he did this as a last-ditch effort to encourage the acquisition of further observations, including searches for possible data from several years earlier. The recognition of some observations from 1990 made it quite clear that there could be no collision with 1997 XF11 during the foreseeable future.

Dr. Marsden also played a key role in the "demotion" of Pluto to dwarf planet status. He once proposed that Pluto should be cross-listed as both a planet and a "minor planet," and assigned the asteroid number 10000. That proposal was not accepted. However, in 2006 a vote by members of the International Astronomical Union created a new category of "dwarf planets," which includes Pluto, Ceres, and several other objects. Pluto was designated minor planet 134340. This decision remains controversial.

Marsden was born on August 5, 1937, in Cambridge, England. He received an undergraduate degree in mathematics from New College, University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. from Yale University.

At the invitation of director Fred Whipple, Dr. Marsden joined the staff of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., in 1965. He became director of the Minor Planet Center in 1978. (The MPC is the official organization in charge of collecting observational data for asteroids and comets, calculating their orbits, and publishing this information via Circulars.) Marsden served as an associate director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics from 1987 to 2003 (the longest tenure of any of the Center's associate directors).

Among the various awards he received from the U.S., the U.K., and a handful of other European countries, the ones he particularly appreciated were the 1995 Dirk Brouwer Award (named for his mentor at Yale) from the American Astronomical Society's (AAS) Division on Dynamical Astronomy, and the 1989 Van Biesbroeck Award (named for an old friend and observer of comets and double stars), then presented by the University of Arizona (now by the AAS) for service to astronomy.

Dr. Marsden married Nancy Lou Zissell, of Trumbull, Connecticut, on December 26, 1964, and fathered Cynthia Louise Marsden-Williams (who is now married to Gareth Williams, still MPC associate director), of Arlington, Massachusetts, and Jonathan Brian Marsden, of San Mateo, California. He also has three grandchildren in California: Nikhilas, Nathaniel, and Neena. A sister, Sylvia Custerson, continues to reside in Cambridge, England.

Dr. Marsden's full biography is available online.

Headquartered in Cambridge, Mass., the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is a joint collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory. CfA scientists, organized into six research divisions, study the origin, evolution and ultimate fate of the universe.

For more information, contact:

David A. Aguilar
Director of Public Affairs
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
617-495-7462
daguilar@cfa.harvard.edu

Christine Pulliam
Public Affairs Specialist
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
617-495-7463
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu


Source: Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Press Release

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#70    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 10:39 PM

Former NASA Astronaut John "Mike" Lounge Dies


The NASA press release is reproduced below:

03.03.11

Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters
Johnson Space Center, Houston
281-483-5111          
      

RELEASE : J11-006

Former NASA Astronaut John "Mike" Lounge Dies


HOUSTON – Former NASA astronaut John “Mike” Lounge, 64, died Tuesday morning.

“All of us at the Johnson Space Center are deeply saddened by the passing of former astronaut Mike Lounge,” said Michael Coats, Director, Johnson Space Center. “I personally had the pleasure of working with Mike in one capacity or another for more than 30 years. He had an unwavering love of country and dedication to our nation’s space program, as evidenced by a sterling career as a naval aviator and astronaut, and veteran of three space shuttle missions. His many friends at Johnson are thinking of Mike’s family during this difficult time.”

Lounge’s service to NASA began at Johnson in July 1978, when he worked as lead engineer for space shuttle launched satellites, and as a member of the Skylab re-entry flight control team.

Lounge, a Navy veteran, went on to join the astronaut corps in 1980 and after his initial training, served as a member of the launch support team NASA’s Kennedy Space Center for the STS-1, STS-2 and STS-3 missions.

Lounge was a veteran of three space flights, logging more than 20 days in space. He flew on STS-51I in 1985, STS-26, the first shuttle flight after the Challenger accident, in September 1988 and STS-35 in December 1990.

He went on to serve as the chief of the Space Station Support Office, representing astronaut interests in space station design and operation planning until his retirement from NASA in 1991.

For complete biographical information, visit

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/lounge-jm.html

- end -
___________________________


Source: NASA - Press Release J11-006

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#71    Persia

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 08:18 AM

Obit: Baruch Blumberg, Nobel winner and extraterrestrial researcher

http://content.usato...er-dies-at-85/1

http://en.wikipedia....Samuel_Blumberg

http://www.openminds...rcher-dies-652/

http://www.washingto...ebrC_story.html

http://www.latimes.c...0,3448227.story

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#72    Habitat

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 09:31 AM

I'd never heard of him, vale Baruch, you 'done good'.  :tu:


#73    Lucky7

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 08:45 PM

Rest In Peace.


#74    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 05:12 PM

Paul Dembling, Co-Author of Space Act, Dies at 91

05.17.10



Paul G. Dembling, co-author of the legislation that founded NASA, died on Monday, May 16, in Florida. He was 91 years old.

Posted Image
Paul G. Dembling helped write the
agency's charter, the National
Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958.
Credit: NASA


As general counsel to NASA's precursor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), Dembling helped shape the agency's legislative charter, the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958. In a 1992 interview, Dembling described the process of drafting the bill.

"A lot of the policy aspects of it were done quickly," Dembling said. "But the functions and the authorities that were embodied in that piece of legislation were well thought out and very well considered."

Dembling was born in Rahway, N.J., on Jan. 11, 1920. He earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1940 and a master's degree in 1942 from Rutgers University. He earned a J.D. from George Washington University Law School, where he served as an editor of the law review.

After NASA became operational, Dembling joined the staff, eventually becoming the agency's general counsel. He also managed the agency’s Legislative Affairs Office under Administrator James Webb, and served as a deputy associate administrator before retiring in December 1969.

"Of all the jobs I have had and things I have done, I am most pleased with the creation of the legislation for NASA," Dembling said in a 2002 interview.

Related Links:
› Dembling Interview for 50th Anniversary Magazine
National Aeronautics and Space Act: › Unamended | › As Amended
› Eileen Galloway, Woman Who Helped Create NASA, Dies at 102
› Legislative Origins of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (PDF)

Source: NASA - News & Features - NASA People

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#75    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:31 PM

Sorry this is a few days old, I missed it at the time.




Former Kennedy Space Center Director Lee Scherer Dies at 91

05.11.10



Lee Scherer, the second director of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, died Saturday morning in his San Diego home. He was 91.

Posted Image
Image above: Former Kennedy Space
Center Director Lee Scherer, left, talks
with the former Director of Launch
Operations Walter Kapryan following the
successful lift off of the Apollo-Soyuz
Test Project on July 15, 1975.
Photo credit: NASA

› Larger image


Scherer was born in Charleston, S.C., on Sept. 20, 1919. He attended the University of Kentucky, was a 1942 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and a retired naval aviator. He also received a master's degree in aeronautical engineering from the California Institute of Technology and a doctorate from the University of Central Florida.

Posted Image
Image above: On May 21, 1976, Lee
Scherer, Kennedy Space Center's second
director, pilots the first airplane to
land on the Shuttle Landing Facility in
Florida.
Photo credit: NASA

› Larger image


From 1967 to 1971, he led the Apollo Lunar Exploration Office at NASA Headquarters in Washington and helped pick out landing sites and exploration opportunities for the first human expedition on the moon. In 2009 as the nation was celebrating the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11, Scherer talked to Spaceport News, Kennedy's newspaper, staff about his work with NASA's Apollo Program.

“We watched the first man step down onto the moon on a vague, rough television picture. It was breathtaking for everyone in the program,” he said.

Posted Image
Image above: On May 21, 1976, Lee
Scherer, Kennedy Space Center's second
director, poses for a photo after landing
the first air plane on the Shuttle Landing
Facility in Florida.
Photo credit: NASA

› Larger image


Scherer then assumed the role of director at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. During his tenure at Kennedy from 1975 to 1979, Scherer oversaw the launch of more than 50 satellites and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project -- the last Apollo mission and the first collaborative mission for the United States and Russia. He also managed the transformation of the center as NASA geared up for the Space Shuttle Program and was the first to land a plane on the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF).

"I made about four landings over there with nobody to see me but the alligators. Then went over to the strip and made two touch-and-go's and then a full-stop landing," Scherer recalled during an oral history interview in 2002.

"There was a busload of people that had come out to watch it, a couple of reporters there who had a few questions . . . I said 'That is the most unimportant landing that'll probably ever be made at this facility,'" Scherer joked. "It was quite a thrill. I was a carrier pilot so I'm used to landing in small areas. That runway goes right on out over the horizon."

Posted Image
Image above: Former Kennedy Space
Center Director Lee Scherer greets
President Jimmy Carter for a tour of
the center on Oct. 1, 1978.
Photo credit: NASA

› Larger image


He returned to NASA Headquarters as associate administrator of external relations until 1980, before becoming a senior executive with General Dynamics Commercial Services Group in San Diego.

Scherer is described as a lifelong advocate of America's space program and often joined the Kennedy work force on launch days and returned for center director forums.

Posted Image
Image above: Former Kennedy Space
Center Director Lee Scherer talks to a
crowd gathered to see the arrival of
space shuttle Columbia aboard a Boeing
747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on March 24,
1979.
Photo credit: NASA

› Larger image


"We have lost one of our biggest boosters, and he will be missed," said current Kennedy Director Bob Cabana. "Please keep his family in your thoughts and prayers."

Scherer is survived by his wife, Sheryn.

Rebecca Regan
NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center


Source: NASA/KSC - Kennedy News

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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