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The Next 2012


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#61    archernyc

archernyc

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 09:10 PM

My vote is for a worldwide water shortage.

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Simply put, water scarcity is either the lack of enough water (quantity) or lack of access to safe water (quality).

It's hard for most of us to imagine that clean, safe water is not something that can be taken for granted. But, in the developing world, finding a reliable source of safe water is often time consuming and expensive. This is known as economic scarcity. Water can be found...it simply requires more resources to do it.

In other areas, the lack of water is a more profound problem. There simply isn't enough. That is known as physical scarcity.

The problem of water scarity is a growing one. As more people put ever increasing demands on limited supplies, the cost and effort to build or even maintain access to water will increase.

My link

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When most U.S. citizens think about water shortages if they think about them at all they think about a local problem, possibly in their town or city, maybe their state or region. We don't usually regard such problems as particularly worrisome, sharing confidence that the situation will be readily handled by investment in infrastructure, conservation, or other management strategies. Whatever water feuds arise, e.g., between Arizona and California, we expect to be resolved through negotiations or in the courtroom.

But shift from a local to a global water perspective, and the terms dramatically change. The World Bank reports that 80 countries now have water shortages that threaten health and economies while 40 percent of the world more than 2 billion people have no access to clean water or sanitation. In this context, we cannot expect water conflicts to always be amenably resolved.
more here

http://www.rd.com/yo...ticle55731.html

Water is an essential building block for life.  Need I say more?

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle




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