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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#11071    Otharus

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:17 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 April 2012 - 12:54 PM, said:

But I'll bet there are others here who 'know' a lot about those Nephilim (think Sitchin and Von Däniken).
I know, that's what makes my idea highly relevant, as it is much more down-to-earth than those interpretations as well as the mainstream bible-interpretations.

Edited by Otharus, 15 April 2012 - 01:25 PM.


#11072    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:28 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 April 2012 - 12:31 PM, said:

You haven't read what I said a long time ago, I assume.

My roots are: Dutch, German, Basque, Russian-Jewish. Half of Europe added to my genes, lol. Add to that a haeavy load of Frisian, and you should know you are barking up the wrong tree.

Personally I vote for the Bsques as having one of the oldest traditions and language, but not like Puzz is doing in her thread about Trojans/Basques.
I'll give you another word.

PRESTATU - prepare (Basque)  /PRESTER - priest

What else is a priest than a preparer.

Don't bother linking me to priest etymology - I don't buy it. If it is in Greek from elder, one should consider where that came from into Greek - presbus as old man/elder, the elders were prestatu, preparers of the ancient rites, elders in cultures like Aboriginals are naturally the 'priests' - they prepare the rites for everyone else to follow...so, the Greeks just pick it out of the sky? Who had preists? Troy had many of them. The Iliad starts with the introduction of Apollo's priest, Chryses.


Big Daddy priest:
An alternative view is that pontifex means "preparer of the road", derived from the Etruscan word pont, meaning "road".[3] A minority opinion is that the word is a corruption of a similar-sounding but etymologically unrelated Etruscan word for priest.
http://en.wikipedia....ontifex_Maximus

A PREPARER hey? From some "similar sounding but etymologically unrelated" Etruscan word for priest - I wonder what that word was...

But I'll save it for my Basque thread - just wanted to point out my opinion on the word Prester for priest.

Edited by The Puzzler, 15 April 2012 - 01:32 PM.

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#11073    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:30 PM

View PostOtharus, on 15 April 2012 - 01:17 PM, said:

I know, that's what makes my idea highly relevant, as it is much more down-to-earth than those interpretations as well as the mainstream bible-interpretations.
I'm a huge believer that they were actually PEOPLE - like tall Nordic men roaming the plains of Mesopotamia or at least some kind of tall Scythian type - like leftover Gutians with their Norse sounding names who rampaged through Babylon with their uncouth ways, imagine, not offering your fish to Marduk first...barbarians.

Edited by The Puzzler, 15 April 2012 - 01:33 PM.

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#11074    Otharus

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:35 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 April 2012 - 01:28 PM, said:

I'll give you another word.

PRESTATU - prepare (Basque)  /PRESTER - priest

What else is a priest than a preparer.
Yes, makes sense to me.


#11075    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:43 PM

View PostOtharus, on 15 April 2012 - 01:35 PM, said:

Yes, makes sense to me.
:tu:

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#11076    Abramelin

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 02:34 PM

From my French-Basque dictionary:

Prestasun/Prestu

Attached File  Prestasun.jpg   99.23K   15 downloads

Neba:

Attached File  Nebu.jpg   37.82K   18 downloads

Priest (prêtre):

Attached File  APEZ.jpg   45.06K   12 downloads

.

Edited by Abramelin, 15 April 2012 - 02:58 PM.


#11077    Abramelin

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:02 PM

Like I said before: if those OLB Geertmen - because that's what this is also about - did indeed live for 1200 years in the Punjab, we would see genetic evidence.

If those Nephilim were of Fryan descent and lived in the Middle East, we would see genetic evidence.

Is there?

++++

EDIT:

Another thing: we should also find remnants of those 'citadels' in these countries.

Sure, lots of ancient fortresses and settlements are being found, but no OLB style fortress or citadel. Not in the Middle East, not in the Punjab.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 15 April 2012 - 03:08 PM.


#11078    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:11 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 April 2012 - 02:34 PM, said:

From my French-Basque dictionary:

Prestasun/Prestu

Attachment Prestasun.jpg

Neba:

Attachment Nebu.jpg

Priest (prętre):

Attachment APEZ.jpg

.
...and Herodotus tells us the Pelasgians called their Gods by no names, just Gods, which meant 'disposers' - like prestatu there - your point?

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#11079    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:15 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 April 2012 - 03:02 PM, said:

Like I said before: if those OLB Geertmen - because that's what this is also about - did indeed live for 1200 years in the Punjab, we would see genetic evidence.

If those Nephilim were of Fryan descent and lived in the Middle East, we would see genetic evidence.

Is there?

++++

EDIT:

Another thing: we should also find remnants of those 'citadels' in these countries.

Sure, lots of ancient fortresses and settlements are being found, but no OLB style fortress or citadel. Not in the Middle East, not in the Punjab.

.
You'd first have to establish the dna haplogroups of the Geertmen, who may have lived 1500BC.

Again, you'd have to establish which haplogroup you are looking for.

Not that know of, they only discovered Hattusa 100 years ago and it was massive, small citadels from thousands of years ago in areas like the Middle East or the Punjab, today, may not be available to find.

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#11080    Abramelin

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:18 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 April 2012 - 03:11 PM, said:

...and Herodotus tells us the Pelasgians called their Gods by no names, just Gods, which meant 'disposers' - like prestatu there - your point?

If you think the ancient ancestors of the Basques are the same people as the Pelasgians, who knows?
My point? APEZ is the Basque word for priest.

NEBA is the Basque word for "the brother of a sister". Close but no cookie (just in case anyone starts about Nep, Nef, NBL/NVL/Nephilim/Nebula being of Basque origin).

You are busy doing your best to try to prove that Basque is something like the source for every European language.

And when it suits you, you switch to Fryan/Old Frisian to try the same.

This will be fun to watch.

Edited by Abramelin, 15 April 2012 - 03:47 PM.


#11081    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:55 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 April 2012 - 03:18 PM, said:

If you think the ancient ancestors of the Basques are the same people as the Pelasgians, who knows?
My point? APEZ is the Basque word for priest.

NEBA is the Basque word for "the brother of a sister". Close but no cookie (just in case anyone starts about Nep, Nef, NBL/NVL/Nephilim/Nebula being of Basque origin).

You are busy doing your best to try to prove that Basque is something like the source for every European language.

And when it suits you, you switch to Fryan/Old Frisian to try the same.

This will be fun to watch.
I said prestatu was the Basque word for preparer not priest.

Yes, I am, that is my aim. The language of the Garden of Eden.

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#11082    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:14 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 April 2012 - 03:18 PM, said:

If you think the ancient ancestors of the Basques are the same people as the Pelasgians, who knows?
My point? APEZ is the Basque word for priest.

NEBA is the Basque word for "the brother of a sister". Close but no cookie (just in case anyone starts about Nep, Nef, NBL/NVL/Nephilim/Nebula being of Basque origin).

You are busy doing your best to try to prove that Basque is something like the source for every European language.

And when it suits you, you switch to Fryan/Old Frisian to try the same.

This will be fun to watch.
the brother of a sister, lol... what does that even mean - what it means is NEBA is actually the name one calls the siblings of a woman - my brothers could be called 'neba'.

Siblings children (nieces and nephews) are called loba.

---------------------

No Neptune but I just realised Diana could be 'called the sibling of her brother' - the brother being Apollo, she being his sister = dei+anai = call+sibling of a man (anai) - more for the Basque thread, sorry guys, anyway, bed for me.

Edited by The Puzzler, 15 April 2012 - 04:21 PM.

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#11083    Abramelin

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:24 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 April 2012 - 03:15 PM, said:

You'd first have to establish the dna haplogroups of the Geertmen, who may have lived 1500BC.

Again, you'd have to establish which haplogroup you are looking for.

Not that know of, they only discovered Hattusa 100 years ago and it was massive, small citadels from thousands of years ago in areas like the Middle East or the Punjab, today, may not be available to find.

The haplo groups we are looking for could be found by extracting DNA fom 3500 years old bones found in NW Europe.

=

They found lots of ancient cities and ancient fortresses, but not any looking similar to an OLB fortress.


#11084    Abramelin

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:27 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 April 2012 - 04:14 PM, said:

the brother of a sister, lol... what does that even mean - what it means is NEBA is actually the name one calls the siblings of a woman - my brothers could be called 'neba'.

Siblings children (nieces and nephews) are called loba.

---------------------

No Neptune but I just realised Diana could be 'called the sibling of her brother' - the brother being Apollo, she being his sister = dei+anai = call+sibling of a man (anai) - more for the Basque thread, sorry guys, anyway, bed for me.

NEBA is explained as "brother of a sister" to make it clear it is not a brother (frêre in French or frater in Latin) of a religious order, or even a best pal.

And so yes, your own brother would be called NEBA.


==

EDIT:

The Google Translator says LOBA means nephew, but the word LOBA isnt even in my dictionary, lol.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 15 April 2012 - 04:48 PM.


#11085    Van Gorp

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:53 PM

From there she went to the Lithauers (Face-hewers), so called because they always strike at their enemy’s face.

Lied-Houwers: Houwen op de (volkse) lieden.  

(Note: and with the Toma-Hawk Hietbrink says: "Dome howik".  Daar houw ik mee.)


One came from the far south-east, and called themselves Allemannen. They had given themselves this name when they had no women among them, and were wandering as exiles in the forests.
Alle-mant: allemaal mannen, Allemant France, Allemansbos Erpe Mere

The other tribe, that wandered about in the neighbourhood, called themselves Franks, not because they were free, but the name of their first king was Frank, who, by the help of the degenerate maidens, had had himself made hereditary king over his people -> Hoe frank is dat! frankly spoken.

...

Goropisms all about :-)