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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#10951    Van Gorp

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 11:31 PM

View PostKnul, on 08 April 2012 - 05:35 PM, said:

Indeed very interesting and worthwile to investigate further.The matter is, if the Greek derived their pantheon from Nordic people or from the Middle East.

Hey Guys,

Can we please stick to the subject :-)

Good intentions, but after 2 posts OLB seems to play again all around the world lol

For me, i like to keep it simple.

Ka-Samyr: dal (valley) in a mountain -> wow must be unusual to see!

Like always, quick check Noormandy, Picardy, Artesia and bingo: Mont de Dalles close to Samer.  
On top of that you can visit also the Peene Vallei: you would think you were in Kashmir :-).  

What about Punjab and Kashmir on the other side of the word?  
Scythe was there too and called all the same according to the same natural circumstances.


#10952    The Puzzler

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 11:32 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 08 April 2012 - 06:21 PM, said:

That was in/near Afghanistan, lol.

And nowhere near Northern Europe.
So, Scythians took it into Northern Europe.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#10953    Knul

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 06:42 AM

Movie on LINDESNES (MS 147 r.12): http://www.campersite.be/reizen/Noorwegen/noel2008/dag7/lindesnes.php




#10954    Knul

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 06:44 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 08 April 2012 - 11:31 PM, said:

Hey Guys,

Can we please stick to the subject :-)

Good intentions, but after 2 posts OLB seems to play again all around the world lol

For me, i like to keep it simple.

Ka-Samyr: dal (valley) in a mountain -> wow must be unusual to see!

Like always, quick check Noormandy, Picardy, Artesia and bingo: Mont de Dalles close to Samer.  
On top of that you can visit also the Peene Vallei: you would think you were in Kashmir :-).  

What about Punjab and Kashmir on the other side of the word?  
Scythe was there too and called all the same according to the same natural circumstances.
Did you explain the meaning of the word Kasamyr ? Or Kri-sen ? I mean not the Gorpian way, but linguistically.

Edited by Knul, 09 April 2012 - 06:47 AM.


#10955    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 07:53 AM

View PostKnul, on 09 April 2012 - 06:44 AM, said:

Did you explain the meaning of the word Kasamyr ? Or Kri-sen ? I mean not the Gorpian way, but linguistically.
As a result of the hero's actions, the people named the valley as "Kashyap-Mar", meaning abode of Kashyap, and "Kashyap-Pura", meaning city of Kashyap, in Sanskrit.[4] The name "Kashmir," in Sanskrit, implies land desiccated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desiccate).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kashmir

It might come from the drying out of the water - ka-shimeera

shimmer probably comes from this word, like sand on the beach with the sun on it, when the water is soaking into it as the water laps up on the shore, this is shimmery, the word is probably steeped in this meaning. Desicated coconut is dried out coconut.

This to me makes sense of why it was so called.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#10956    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 08:49 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 08 April 2012 - 11:31 PM, said:

Hey Guys,

Can we please stick to the subject :-)

Good intentions, but after 2 posts OLB seems to play again all around the world lol

For me, i like to keep it simple.

Ka-Samyr: dal (valley) in a mountain -> wow must be unusual to see!

Like always, quick check Noormandy, Picardy, Artesia and bingo: Mont de Dalles close to Samer.  
On top of that you can visit also the Peene Vallei: you would think you were in Kashmir :-).  

What about Punjab and Kashmir on the other side of the word?  
Scythe was there too and called all the same according to the same natural circumstances.

Then you should start reading the OLB, and you will understand the connection.


#10957    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 08:53 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 09 April 2012 - 07:53 AM, said:

As a result of the hero's actions, the people named the valley as "Kashyap-Mar", meaning abode of Kashyap, and "Kashyap-Pura", meaning city of Kashyap, in Sanskrit.[4] The name "Kashmir," in Sanskrit, implies land desiccated from water: "ka" (the water) and shimeera (to desiccate).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kashmir

It might come from the drying out of the water - ka-shimeera

shimmer probably comes from this word, like sand on the beach with the sun on it, when the water is soaking into it as the water laps up on the shore, this is shimmery, the word is probably steeped in this meaning. Desicated coconut is dried out coconut.

This to me makes sense of why it was so called.

Yes, you posted that before, but the OLB suggests that 'rare' is a translation of 'Kasamyr'.

In whatever way we chop the word up, nothing points to a part meaning 'rare'.


#10958    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 09:45 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2012 - 08:53 AM, said:

Yes, you posted that before, but the OLB suggests that 'rare' is a translation of 'Kasamyr'.

In whatever way we chop the word up, nothing points to a part meaning 'rare'.
shimmer (v.) O.E. scimerian "to glitter," related to (perhaps a frequentative of) scimian "to shine," also "grow dark," and scinan (see shine). Ultimately from P.Gmc. *skim- (cf. Swed. skimra, Du. schemeren "to glitter," Ger. schimmern), from PIE root *skai- "to gleam, to shine."
http://www.etymonlin...hp?term=shimmer
Sure it could imo, to glitter, to shine - like gold.

In the heart of Findasland, upon a mountain, lies a plain called Kasamyr (Cashmere) that is “extraordinary.”
In-t hirte fon Findas lând vppet berchta lęid en del, thęr is kęthen Kasamyr, thet is sjeldsum.

Sjeldsum/seldom - extraordinary - rare could imo go through to meaning this - the desication may have been an extraordinary happening, which produced a shimmery area, that glittered like gold.

Verb
shimmer (third-person singular simple present shimmers, present participle shimmering, simple past and past participle shimmered)
1.(intransitive) To shine with a veiled, tremulous, or intermittent light; to gleam faintly; to glisten; to glimmer.
Translations
to shine with a veiled light; to gleam faintly; to glisten; to glimmer
1.A faint or veiled and tremulous gleam or shining; a glimmer.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/shimmer

A glimmer of hope can transfer to a tiny bit - a rare chance in other words.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#10959    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 09:47 AM

"Extraordinary" is not the right translation for "sjeldsum". It really should be "rare".


#10960    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:10 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 08 April 2012 - 06:17 PM, said:

The matter is... did Indians during Ashoka's time travel as far as Northern Europe or even Scandinavia and spread their Buddhist religion there?

And was Odin no one else but Buddha?

.

The next I posted in a thread I once started about the possibility that Native Americans may have discovered Europe many ages before Columbus discovered America.

It's about Roman writers mentioning "Indos", meaning: people from India. But instead of thinking these could have been Native Americans, maybe they were what the Romans said they were: people from India??


View PostAbramelin, on 21 February 2010 - 11:12 PM, said:

I found it, Marcos:


It's in chapter 5 of the book THE AMERICAN DISCOVERY OF EUROPE,  "5. From Iberia to the Baltic: Americans in Roman and Pre-Modern Europe"

http://books.google....page&q=&f=false

A screenshot:

Attached File  BOI-Indians.jpg   85.35K   7 downloads

.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 April 2012 - 10:12 AM.


#10961    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:21 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2012 - 09:47 AM, said:

"Extraordinary" is not the right translation for "sjeldsum". It really should be "rare".
I agree and my 'translation' took that into account.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#10962    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 12:04 PM

View PostKnul, on 08 April 2012 - 07:54 PM, said:

Who can complete this sentence ?

[MS 143]

01 … MIN ЄÐLA HÆVON IN ÆFTER ÐIT BOK SKR-

02 [Y]VEN

You ask, because where you put the dots "...MIN ЄÐLA HÆVON IN ÆFTER ÐIT BOK SKR"   a piece of the paper, top-left, has been torn off.

First the 'official' text, with Sandbach's translation:

Thet skrift fon konerêd.

Min êthla haevon in aefter thit bok skrêven. Thit wil ik boppa ella dva, vmbe thaet er in min stât nên burch ovir is, hwêrin tha bêrtnesa vp skrêven wrde lik to fâra.

THE WRITING OF KONERÊD.

My forefathers have written this book in succession. I will do this, the more because there exists no longer in my state any citadel on which events are inscribed as used to be the case
.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bs



It already starts wrong: "êthla" doesn't mean 'forefathers', it means nobles (or 'edelen' in Dutch):


ethe-l-e 10, afries., Adj.: nhd. edel, adlig, vollbürtig, frei, vortrefflich; ne. noble,
freeborn
; ÜG.: lat. næbilis L 22; Vw.: s. un-; Hw.: vgl. ae. Ïþele, as. ethili*, ahd.
edili (2); Q.: L 22; E.: germ. *aþala-, *aþalaz, *aþalja-, *aþaljaz, Adj., von
vornehmem Geschlecht, von Adel, angestammt; germ. *aþilu-, *aþiluz, Adj., von
vornehmem Geschlecht, von Adel, angestammt; vgl. idg. *Àtos, *atta, Sb., Vater,
Mutter (F.) (1), Pokorny 71, EWAhd 1, 48; W.: nfries. edel, eel, adj., edel, adlig;
L.: Hh 22b, Rh 720a

ethe-l-e, afries., M., N.: Vw.: s. ethe-l (1)

ethe-l-hê-d 11, afries., st. F. (i): nhd. Adel (M.) (1), Schönheit; ne. nobility,
beauty
; Hw.: vgl. mnd. edelhêit, mnl. edelheit, mhd. edelheit; Q.: AA 172; E.: s.

ethe-l-e, *hê-d; W.: nfries. adelheyt; L.: Hh 22a, Rh 720b, AA 172

The translation of the sentence would then start with "My nobles .... "

Doesn't sound right, so "MIN" is the end, the last 3 letters of another word, or so it seems, and not a word in itself.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 April 2012 - 12:14 PM.


#10963    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 12:22 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 April 2012 - 12:04 PM, said:

You ask, because where you put the dots "...MIN ЄÐLA HÆVON IN ÆFTER ÐIT BOK SKR"   a piece of the paper, top-left, has been torn off.

First the 'official' text, with Sandbach's translation:

Thet skrift fon konerêd.

Min êthla haevon in aefter thit bok skrêven. Thit wil ik boppa ella dva, vmbe thaet er in min stât nên burch ovir is, hwêrin tha bêrtnesa vp skrêven wrde lik to fâra.

THE WRITING OF KONERÊD.

My forefathers have written this book in succession. I will do this, the more because there exists no longer in my state any citadel on which events are inscribed as used to be the case
.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bs



It already starts wrong: "êthla" doesn't mean 'forefathers', it means nobles (or 'edelen' in Dutch):


ethe-l-e 10, afries., Adj.: nhd. edel, adlig, vollbürtig, frei, vortrefflich; ne. noble,
freeborn
; ÜG.: lat. næbilis L 22; Vw.: s. un-; Hw.: vgl. ae. Ïþele, as. ethili*, ahd.
edili (2); Q.: L 22; E.: germ. *aþala-, *aþalaz, *aþalja-, *aþaljaz, Adj., von
vornehmem Geschlecht, von Adel, angestammt; germ. *aþilu-, *aþiluz, Adj., von
vornehmem Geschlecht, von Adel, angestammt; vgl. idg. *Àtos, *atta, Sb., Vater,
Mutter (F.) (1), Pokorny 71, EWAhd 1, 48; W.: nfries. edel, eel, adj., edel, adlig;
L.: Hh 22b, Rh 720a

ethe-l-e, afries., M., N.: Vw.: s. ethe-l (1)

ethe-l-hê-d 11, afries., st. F. (i): nhd. Adel (M.) (1), Schönheit; ne. nobility,
beauty
; Hw.: vgl. mnd. edelhêit, mnl. edelheit, mhd. edelheit; Q.: AA 172; E.: s.

ethe-l-e, *hê-d; W.: nfries. adelheyt; L.: Hh 22a, Rh 720b, AA 172

The translation of the sentence would then start with "My nobles .... "

Doesn't sound right, so "MIN" is the end, the last 3 letters of another word, or so it seems, and not a word in itself.

.
Ethel is nobility, I have an old Aunty Ethel, anyway, I also found this connection to the name...

Ethel fem. proper name, originally a shortening of O.E. Etheldred, Ethelinda, etc., in which the first element means "nobility.

"estate early 13c., "rank, standing, condition," from Anglo-Fr. astat, O.Fr. estat "state, position, condition, health, status, legal estate" (Mod.Fr. état), from L. status "state or condition," from root of stare "to stand" from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet). For initial e-, see especial. Sense of "property" is late 14c., from that of "worldly prosperity;" specific application to "landed property" (usually of large extent) is first recorded in Amer.Eng. 1620s. A native word for this was M.E. ethel (O.E. æðel) "ancestral land or estate, patrimony."

http://www.etymonlin...hp?search=Ethel

It maybe should be 'my ancestors...' (on my fathers side) = my forefathers.

Edited by The Puzzler, 09 April 2012 - 12:24 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#10964    Abramelin

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 12:58 PM

OK, yes, they have consequently translated it throughout the OLB as 'forefathers', and most often that seems to look like the right translation :


Okke min svn.

Thissa boka mot i mith lif aend sêle wârja. Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk âk fon vsa êthlum.

OKKE MY SON—

You must preserve these books with body and soul. They contain the history of all our people, as well as of our forefathers.



==

Ljawa ervnôma. Vmb vsa ljawa êthlas wille aend vmb vsa ljawa fridoms wille,

Beloved successors, for the sake of our dear forefathers, and of our dear liberty,

==


Baern mot maen lêre, ho grât vs lànd êr wèsen sy, hokke grâte maenniska vsa ethla wêron,

You must teach the children how great our country has been, what great men our forefathers were,

==

Forth hi en êrenâma vppa sine skeld fon sina êthelun, sâ ne mügon sina sibba thi nâma navt lônger ne fora.

If he bears on his shield the honourable name of his forefathers, his kinsmen shall no longer wear it,




But if you look at the original page in the manuscript here:

http://images.tresoa...hp?p=145&pm=212

... then it is clear there was some word before MIN or some letters attached to MIN.

Every page of the manuscript tends to start in the upper-lefthand corner.

All I can come up with right now, is this:

Samin/Semin= together (DU: samen)  (or Tosemin (DU: tesamen) , but there is no space for 4 extra letters)

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-S.pdf
http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-T.pdf

But that sounds even worse, lol.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 April 2012 - 01:02 PM.


#10965    The Puzzler

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:22 PM

It looks abit like FRY to me, on the ripped attached part - frymin? my free forefathers?

frymin ethel

freemy forefathers - my free forefathers

Edited by The Puzzler, 09 April 2012 - 01:23 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...