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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#4891    Abramelin

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 02:45 PM

View PostAlewyn, on 15 May 2011 - 10:24 AM, said:

If you read between the lines, they could have had some form of written communication. All their fortifications' excavations had exactly the same volume even though they were different in terms of depth, circumference, etc. But, we do not want to speculate too much, now do we?

They could have made a drawing??

[Btw: I noticed in one of my former posts that I used the word "climactic", lol. Of course I meant "climatic".]


#4892    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 04:57 PM

Just taking a break from intense posts in this OLB thread. Still reading the posts but will only contribute when I think I have something new to add.

I think the word Gades (Cadiz) is gate, as in opening, passage. The straits, the opening passage. Or even into Gades itself, it seems logical that gate would be word used to name this area.

Could even be a reference then to all gates in that area, like the gates of Hades or such... gosh, now Hades sounds alot like Gades.

gate (n.)
"opening, entrance," O.E. geat (pl. geatu) "gate, door, opening, passage, hinged framework barrier," from P.Gmc. *gatan (cf. O.N. gat "opening, passage," O.S. gat "eye of a needle, hole," O.Fris. gat "hole, opening," Du. gat "gap, hole, breach," Ger. Gasse "street"), of unknown origin

http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=gate

The name of Gades may not be a Semitic word at all.

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#4893    Abramelin

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 05:51 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 May 2011 - 04:57 PM, said:

Just taking a break from intense posts in this OLB thread. Still reading the posts but will only contribute when I think I have something new to add.

I think the word Gades (Cadiz) is gate, as in opening, passage. The straits, the opening passage. Or even into Gades itself, it seems logical that gate would be word used to name this area.

Could even be a reference then to all gates in that area, like the gates of Hades or such... gosh, now Hades sounds alot like Gades.

gate (n.)
"opening, entrance," O.E. geat (pl. geatu) "gate, door, opening, passage, hinged framework barrier," from P.Gmc. *gatan (cf. O.N. gat "opening, passage," O.S. gat "eye of a needle, hole," O.Fris. gat "hole, opening," Du. gat "gap, hole, breach," Ger. Gasse "street"), of unknown origin

http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=gate

The name of Gades may not be a Semitic word at all.

But Cadiz doesn't oversee the Strait of Gibraltar, so I don't think it means 'gate'.

You appear to believe in most (if not all) of the OLB, so here a quote:

When Teunis wished to return home, he went first towards Denmark; but he might not land there, for so the mother had ordered, nor was he to land at Flyland nor anywhere about there. In this way he would have lost all his people by want and hardship, so he landed at night to steal and sailed on by day. Thus coasting along, he at length arrived at the colony of Kadik (Cadiz), so called because it was built with a stone quay.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/


++

EDIT:

I forgot to add the official etymology and the older names of Cadiz:

Gadir (in Phoenician: גדר), the original name given to the outpost established here by the Phoenicians, means "wall, compound", or, more generally, "walled stronghold". The Punic dialect lent this word, along with many others, to the Berber languages, where it was nativised as agadir meaning "wall" in Tamazight and "fortified granary" in Shilha; it appears as a common place name in North Africa.[2] The name of the Israeli town of Gedera has a similar etymology.

Later, the city became known by a similar Attic Greek name, Gádeira, τὰ Γάδειρα. In Ionic Greek, the name is spelled slightly differently, Gḗdeira Γήδειρα. This spelling appears in the histories written by Herodotus. Rarely, the name is spelled Gadeíra ἡ Γαδείρα, as, for example, in the writings of Eratosthenes (as attested by Stephanus of Byzantium).

In Latin, the city was known as Gades; in modern Arabic, it is called قادس, Qādis.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadiz

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Edited by Abramelin, 15 May 2011 - 06:19 PM.


#4894    The Puzzler

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 10:04 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 May 2011 - 05:51 PM, said:

But Cadiz doesn't oversee the Strait of Gibraltar, so I don't think it means 'gate'.

You appear to believe in most (if not all) of the OLB, so here a quote:

When Teunis wished to return home, he went first towards Denmark; but he might not land there, for so the mother had ordered, nor was he to land at Flyland nor anywhere about there. In this way he would have lost all his people by want and hardship, so he landed at night to steal and sailed on by day. Thus coasting along, he at length arrived at the colony of Kadik (Cadiz), so called because it was built with a stone quay.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/


++

EDIT:

I forgot to add the official etymology and the older names of Cadiz:

Gadir (in Phoenician: גדר), the original name given to the outpost established here by the Phoenicians, means "wall, compound", or, more generally, "walled stronghold". The Punic dialect lent this word, along with many others, to the Berber languages, where it was nativised as agadir meaning "wall" in Tamazight and "fortified granary" in Shilha; it appears as a common place name in North Africa.[2] The name of the Israeli town of Gedera has a similar etymology.

Later, the city became known by a similar Attic Greek name, Gádeira, τὰ Γάδειρα. In Ionic Greek, the name is spelled slightly differently, Gḗdeira Γήδειρα. This spelling appears in the histories written by Herodotus. Rarely, the name is spelled Gadeíra ἡ Γαδείρα, as, for example, in the writings of Eratosthenes (as attested by Stephanus of Byzantium).

In Latin, the city was known as Gades; in modern Arabic, it is called قادس, Qādis.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadiz

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I forgot to add I already know what Gades is meant to mean but as I said in the other thread - gate is a walled cmpound, if you read Atlantis again, it's exactly what the walls of Atlantis were, walled gates of a walled compound.

Gates make the walled compound. Walled compound can be gate.

It's the same scenario as Sur - the Canaanite word can actually equate to a similar meaning in IE -Sur=rock Tyr=rock

Stone quay, dam, dike - dikes are large walls of SLUICE gates.


Compounds usually have gates and or walls.

I think it's quite possible Gades is the word Gates but if you can show how the word Gades means walled stronghold or compound in some other way, I'm happy to hear it.

Edited by The Puzzler, 15 May 2011 - 10:06 PM.

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#4895    Abramelin

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Posted 15 May 2011 - 11:43 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 15 May 2011 - 10:04 PM, said:

I forgot to add I already know what Gades is meant to mean but as I said in the other thread - gate is a walled cmpound, if you read Atlantis again, it's exactly what the walls of Atlantis were, walled gates of a walled compound.

Gates make the walled compound. Walled compound can be gate.

It's the same scenario as Sur - the Canaanite word can actually equate to a similar meaning in IE -Sur=rock Tyr=rock

Stone quay, dam, dike - dikes are large walls of SLUICE gates.


Compounds usually have gates and or walls.

I think it's quite possible Gades is the word Gates but if you can show how the word Gades means walled stronghold or compound in some other way, I'm happy to hear it.

"The name of the Israeli town of Gedera has a similar etymology"

Gedera was founded in 1884 by members of the Bilu group, near the ruins of a biblical Israelite city. Those ruins were thought to have been the ruins of a biblical city called HaGdera[3] (The fenced city)(Joshua 15:36) or according to another, less probable theory of a biblical city called Gderot (fences)(Joshua 15:41), and therefore the name Gedera (Fenced city) was chosen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gedera

As Phoenician and Hebrew were related languages, I think this etymology is the most likely.

How would you explain this Israeli Gedera in your way? What was it a gate of or to??


But I can play along, lol.

How about this:

goat
O.E. gat "she-goat," from P.Gmc. *gaitaz (cf. O.S. get, O.N. geit, Dan. gjed, M.Du. gheet, Du. geit, O.H.G. geiz, Ger. Geiß, Goth. gaits "goat"), from PIE *ghaidos "young goat," also "play" (cf. L. hædus "kid").


http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=goat


Puzz, you use "Gades", but that was the much later Latin name for the same city.

If you want to do etymology, then you must start with the oldest name for the city, and that's "Gadir".


#4896    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 12:49 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 15 May 2011 - 11:43 PM, said:

"The name of the Israeli town of Gedera has a similar etymology"

Gedera was founded in 1884 by members of the Bilu group, near the ruins of a biblical Israelite city. Those ruins were thought to have been the ruins of a biblical city called HaGdera[3] (The fenced city)(Joshua 15:36) or according to another, less probable theory of a biblical city called Gderot (fences)(Joshua 15:41), and therefore the name Gedera (Fenced city) was chosen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gedera

As Phoenician and Hebrew were related languages, I think this etymology is the most likely.

How would you explain this Israeli Gedera in your way? What was it a gate of or to??


But I can play along, lol.

How about this:

goat
O.E. gat "she-goat," from P.Gmc. *gaitaz (cf. O.S. get, O.N. geit, Dan. gjed, M.Du. gheet, Du. geit, O.H.G. geiz, Ger. Geiß, Goth. gaits "goat"), from PIE *ghaidos "young goat," also "play" (cf. L. hædus "kid").


http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=goat


Puzz, you use "Gades", but that was the much later Latin name for the same city.

If you want to do etymology, then you must start with the oldest name for the city, and that's "Gadir".
Fenced city, walled city, gated city - a stronghold, so even Gedera to me is still saying the same thing.

The word Palace comes from the word for fenced city, basically, too.

The Pal in palace is the term that referred to the fence palings that went up around the area that then acnowledged these areas as a kind of walled, fenced area for the important family.

The word gate is the entrance the hole, the passage, the opening - that becomes part of a whole wall, if the wall opens, it's also a gate, such as the dikes I said.

I'll think some more on it but it fits too well to just brush off easily imo.

The whole concept of the gates of Hades and the gate, opening of the strait itself seems too much intwined in this to actually not be part of the meaning of the area.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#4897    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 12:59 AM

Think about a famous walled stronghold in Mycenae and what we term it now, we don't call it the walled city, it's now known as the Lion's Gate.

The 2 words go hand in hand and you can't seperate them really, all walled strongholds have a gate, you really don't know imo if the word gadir doesn't actually mean gate because the term could have been used for the whole structure.

Think of Troy, they got in through the gate, the opening of the gate led to the end of Troy.

Hades is gate. That's it, it's nothing else but a gate(way).

Since Hades, Pluto was a main God of Europe, it appears the whole of Europe could be involved in a Gate culture, the whole trip to underworld is about going through the gate.

Alligator - bet it's cause it's mouth opens up like a big gate. gator - gadir

I read the alligator Wiki etymology and see no reason it cannot mean all gate basically, you ever seen one, I live in Croc country and I can guarantee you those gators have huge gates! Croc are bigger than gators, we don't run from gators but we sure run from crocs.

The gate shut, it was then a barrier or wall.

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 01:03 AM.

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#4898    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 01:56 AM

Beyond the pillars of Heracles.

What's between the Pillars? A gate of course.

Gates today on house fences are usually supported by 2 pillars on either side.

Through the gate, between the pillars you went into Hades, the gaping hole of the underworld.

The Underworld was outside the straits, it was the Atlantis Sea. Where Atlantis had been, the walled, gated city, now shoals.. she'ols - the underworld of the dead.

I don't think I can budge on it Abe.

In the Underworld you found riches of Pluto, because that's really what Hades means as Pluto, riches of the underground - a MINING God.

That's what it means imo too, maybe in mining, which is extremely dangerous and always has been, imagine how dangerous it was thousands of years ago, another thing I'm very familiar with, mining, I have always lived in mining areas, my own ancestor who came to Australia bought a mine, it's what we do, we mine the ground for riches, people of Hades and the underworld, probably why we tend to bury people rather than cremate. Our last PM got the boot because he wanted to introduce a huge mining tax, our rich men are mining magnates, Australia is fast becoming one big hole.

You could be a miner, risk your life in dying underground but you could also become very, very rich if you succeeded.

--------------

You know what happens in mines, they explode into fiery hells of death.

They sent canaries down in years gone by, canary in a coalmine, for this very reason, to see if it came out and didn't die of gas fumes first so when they went in and started to mine the whole thing didn't explode.

Just recently there has been 2 huge mining incidents, in Chile and New Zealand, it's a dangerous job, our miners get paid very big wages, for danger money.

--------------

You know what else about mines, I just realised - they labyrinths.

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 02:34 AM.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#4899    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 02:39 AM

What about mine shafts, which immediately took me to the grave shafts of Mycenae and the gold face masks. This is now clear to me that mining was on these peoples agenda.

OK, I'm getting off the OLB so that's it for now on that.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
Flagpole Sitta - Harvey Danger

#4900    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 03:20 AM

Maybe one more to connect it all back to the OLB.

Miners always have another thing and without it you are not going mining so it would be extremely important to make sure it never went out and that is a Lamp.

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
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#4901    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 03:42 AM

Posted Image

Baetica.

I wouldn't have picked up on anything here except yesterday I got my new set of Ancient Civilisations cards with DVD and among them was a place called Baiae - The Oracle of the Dead.

In Rome this one was but it was none other than, in the words on the card "Antrum of Initiation" - 'an elaborate complex of tunnels cut into the volcanic rock, was said to represent the HADES of Greek mythology and included an artifical river of Styx', most likely the Guadalquivir in the real Baetica.

The people living there were more TUR people - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turdetani

Edited by The Puzzler, 16 May 2011 - 03:50 AM.

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#4902    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 09:42 AM

Gate:
Posted Image

What you are trying to prove is that 'engine' is another word for 'washing machine' because well, a washing machine does have an engine, right? Like a wall has a gate, ergo, wall=gate.

And the only reason you start about it is because the Latin name for the Phoenician Gadir sounds like gate, and of course because you need a gate in your Atlantis theory...

And I hope you make a connection with the OLB soon; there are already 20 threads about Atlantis. It's a bloody virus.

You already created like 15 Atlantis threads yourself....



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Edited by Abramelin, 16 May 2011 - 09:52 AM.


#4903    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 09:46 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 12:59 AM, said:

Alligator - bet it's cause it's mouth opens up like a big gate. gator - gadir

I read the alligator Wiki etymology and see no reason it cannot mean all gate basically, you ever seen one, I live in Croc country and I can guarantee you those gators have huge gates! Croc are bigger than gators, we don't run from gators but we sure run from crocs.


I read it too:

The name alligator is an anglicized form of el lagarto, the Spanish term for "lizard", which early Spanish explorers and settlers in Florida called the alligator.

Tell me when you're done, Puzz.

This is really a waste of time. But to help you, use this: http://wordsmith.org/anagram/

What you are doing is not reasoning, you are working to a desired end result.



.

Edited by Abramelin, 16 May 2011 - 09:59 AM.


#4904    The Puzzler

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:20 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 16 May 2011 - 09:46 AM, said:

I read it too:

The name alligator is an anglicized form of el lagarto, the Spanish term for "lizard", which early Spanish explorers and settlers in Florida called the alligator.

Tell me when you're done, Puzz.

This is really a waste of time. But to help you, use this: http://wordsmith.org/anagram/

What you are doing is not reasoning, you are working to a desired end result.



.
OK, well forget the alligator for now, what else you got on anything I said, you think Hades isn't gate or anything else I said of the important bit...?

"The agony and the irony, they're killing me"
Flagpole Sitta - Harvey Danger

#4905    Abramelin

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 10:25 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 16 May 2011 - 10:20 AM, said:

OK, well forget the alligator for now, what else you got on anything I said, you think Hades isn't gate or anything else I said of the important bit...?

The important thing is that you seem to skip past the fact that the original name for Gades was Gadir.

And - well, I think - you started to talk about Gades/Cadiz because the city is supposed to show up in the OLB as Kadik.

All the rest would fit into one of your Atlantis threads a lot better.