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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#6541    Abramelin

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 07:20 PM

View PostKnul, on 09 October 2011 - 07:10 PM, said:

Is it reasonable to leave the notification of Lumkamakja in Ast-Flyland ? I don't think so. Makja means make, in the OLB it refers to professions like shipmakja, silmakja. I haven't yet met makja in names of places. This makja should be something like -macia.

OK, so 'makia' means 'make'.

'Lumka' is a Frisian girl's name.

So, according to you, 'Lumka-makia' means 'to make Lumka'??

Nah.

I think the writers of the OLB fooled us again, and have us set out on another wild gopose chase.


#6542    Knul

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 07:24 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 October 2011 - 05:19 PM, said:

The spelling of the city is "Emden", and yes, it sounds close to E-mude.

But look closely at the way it is written in the OLB: E - mude.. or... the "mouth of the river Ee".

There was a small river with the name Ee... and it's mouth lay near a city called Lemmer.

Well, that doesn't sound much like "Lumka-makia", right?

OK, so I checked for maybe an older name, and this is what they think Lemmer was called centuries ago: Lemmerbroek or Lammerbroek.


In het jaar 1165 geeft bisschop Godfried van Utrecht aan de Friezen van
Lammerbroek een stuk grond in het stroomgebied van de Tjonger. Die grond lag tussen de oude loop van de Linde en Kuinre. Het is zeer waarschijnlijk dat diezelfde Friezen - van Lammerhoek of Lemsterhoek - op verzoek van de abt van het St. Oduifusklooster in Staveren de loop van de Kromme Ee bij Tacozijl hebben verbeterd en als ter zake kundigen later het Lindegebied onder handen namen in opdracht van die abt, die in dienst was van de bisschop van Utrecht. Van dit bisdom was Kuinre als 't ware een kolonie.

De Kromme Ee was vroeger een belangrijke verbinding tussen de Middelzee en het meer Flevo.


http://www.friesarch...ion=com_content
http://www.spanvis.n...rzijl/index.htm

In English:

In the year 1165 Bishop Godfried (LOL) of Utrecht gave a piece of land to the Frisians of Lammerbroek in the basin (?) of the river Tjonger

And the "Kromme Ee" is "Crooked/Bent/Curved Ee" in English, and it was an important connection between the Middel Sea and the Flevo Lake (future IJsselmeer).

So the city at the mouth of the Ee ("E-mude") was called "Lammerbroek" or ""Lemmerbroek" long ago; nowadays it's called "Lemmer".

It was also near that other 'interesting' river: the Linde, and located in the socalled "Lindegebied" = Linden area = Lindenoorden, heh.

My guess? "Lumkamakia" was a nickname for a city.

And the "kamakia" part makes me think of something, despite the fact that the name is written in the OLB like this, "Lumka-makia".


+++++++

EDIT:

"Lumka" or "Lumke" is a Frisian girl's name.

"Makia"?

mak-ia 70 und häufiger?, mek-k-ia, mait-ia, meit-ia, afries., sw. V. (2): nhd.
machen, reparieren, bauen, festsetzen, gerichtlich entscheiden, freisprechen,
verurteilen, beschuldigen, verklagen, erklären, erweisen, unter etwas bringen,
pfänden; ne. make (V.), repair (V.), build (V.), decide, accuse (V.), declare; Vw.:
s. for-,
*lÆk-, ðt-, wi-ther-; Hw.: s. mek; vgl. ae. macian, anfrk. makon, as. makon*,
ahd. mahhæn; Q.: R, B, E, H, W, F, S; E.: germ. *makæn, sw. V., machen, kneten;
idg. *ma-, V., kneten, drücken, streichen, machen, Pokorny 696; W.: nfries.
maaikjen, V., machen; L.: Hh 68b, Rh 914b


http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-M.pdf



LOL, maybe someone had a problem with a Frisian girl named "Lumka". And why?

"Kamakia" is Greek for "Harpoon".

"My sweatheart, Lumka, the harpoon".

Lum-ka-kamakia.......

Btw: (damned if I can find it again, but I read somewhere that) Lemmer was once a city in Friesland where whalers lived (think "harpoon").





.



.

It's not elegant nor subtle to shoot a girls' heart with an harpoon.


#6543    Abramelin

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 07:43 PM

View PostKnul, on 09 October 2011 - 07:24 PM, said:

It's not elegant nor subtle to shoot a girls' heart with an harpoon.

No, and maybe it's the girl shooting with a 'harpoon'.

I remember someone calling an ex of mine a 'pit viper'.

I think I know what I'm talking about, lol.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 October 2011 - 07:48 PM.


#6544    Knul

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 08:00 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 09 October 2011 - 07:20 PM, said:

OK, so 'makia' means 'make'.

'Lumka' is a Frisian girl's name.

So, according to you, 'Lumka-makia' means 'to make Lumka'??

Nah.

I think the writers of the OLB fooled us again, and have us set out on another wild gopose chase.

This is not what I said. The name reminds me on Mei-lakkja (Medea, Medemblik.


#6545    Abramelin

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 08:12 PM

View PostKnul, on 09 October 2011 - 08:00 PM, said:

This is not what I said. The name reminds me on Mei-lakkja (Medea, Medemblik.

This is what you said: "It's not elegant nor subtle to shoot a girls' heart with an harpoon."

And this is what you said just before that:

"Is it reasonable to leave the notification of Lumkamakja in Ast-Flyland ? I don't think so. Makja means make, in the OLB it refers to professions like shipmakja, silmakja. I haven't yet met makja in names of places. This makja should be something like -macia."


.

Edited by Abramelin, 09 October 2011 - 08:13 PM.


#6546    Knul

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:34 AM

On this website you find fine maps of the Eems/Dollard area: http://ottoknot.home...ard/index.html. I didn't find something close to Lumkamakja, but found the name Ee for rivers that joined to the Eems. Sure, the name Ee is a common name for water, river. The Lemster option is similarly interesting for Lum-/Lem-  and because it is close to Grouw, where the Halbertsma's lived.  See: http://www.tresoar.n...lingerland.html for the different names of the Ee in Smallingerland.


#6547    The Puzzler

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 02:03 PM

Minna—this was the name of the mother—summoned all the sailors and the young men from Oostflyland and Denmark. From this expedition the history of Wodin sprang, which is inscribed on the citadels, and is here copied. At Aldergamude there lived an old sea-king whose name was Sterik, and whose deeds were famous. This old fellow had three nephews. Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumkamakia, near the Eemude, in Oostflyland, with his parents. He had once commanded troops. Teunis and Inka were naval warriors, and were just then staying with their father at Aldergamude. When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his valiant host.

Seems like this Embden/Emden and the Ems River is the place I've read on other OLB sites sounds most logical.


In East Frisia, Oostflyland might have been the border of Denmark at the time, or Wodin may have lived at Lumkamakja but been in Denmark when they picked him up.

Edited by The Puzzler, 10 October 2011 - 02:04 PM.

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#6548    Abramelin

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 02:46 PM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 10 October 2011 - 02:03 PM, said:

Minna—this was the name of the mother—summoned all the sailors and the young men from Oostflyland and Denmark. From this expedition the history of Wodin sprang, which is inscribed on the citadels, and is here copied. At Aldergamude there lived an old sea-king whose name was Sterik, and whose deeds were famous. This old fellow had three nephews. Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumkamakia, near the Eemude, in Oostflyland, with his parents. He had once commanded troops. Teunis and Inka were naval warriors, and were just then staying with their father at Aldergamude. When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his valiant host.

Seems like this Embden/Emden and the Ems River is the place I've read on other OLB sites sounds most logical.


In East Frisia, Oostflyland might have been the border of Denmark at the time, or Wodin may have lived at Lumkamakja but been in Denmark when they picked him up.


Everybody assumes that Oostflyland is east Friesland or OstFriesland (the German part), but we should not forget that centuries ago the Dutch island of Vlieland was connected with the present province of Friesland.

Presentday Vlieland is nothing but a small island, and also nothing but the remnant of a once much larger area, before the Wadden Sea came into existence. That ancient area included Vlieland, a large part of what's now the Wadden Sea and Friesland; the Vlie river flowed through it. This area itself (depending on how the Vlie flowed through it) may have been this Oost-Vlieland.

And there still is a village called Oostvlieland on the island of Vlieland.


#6549    Abramelin

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 02:55 PM

View PostKnul, on 10 October 2011 - 07:34 AM, said:

On this website you find fine maps of the Eems/Dollard area: http://ottoknot.home...ard/index.html. I didn't find something close to Lumkamakja, but found the name Ee for rivers that joined to the Eems. Sure, the name Ee is a common name for water, river. The Lemster option is similarly interesting for Lum-/Lem-  and because it is close to Grouw, where the Halbertsma's lived.  See: http://www.tresoar.n...lingerland.html for the different names of the Ee in Smallingerland.

I found another site with really huge and ancient (clickable) maps of that area:

http://www.heimatkun...llartfluten.htm


Ee Stroom, Aa Stroom:

http://www.heimatkun...Reiderland3.jpg


If we look at the situation near the mouth of the Eems at 800 BC, then things get quite different:

http://www.heimatkun...fluten/Bant.jpg

This ancient mouth of the rivers Eems (the larger prehistoric island of Bant for instance) could havehad many villages that are now long gone.



http://www.heimatkun...5-grp-extra.jpg


Here another huge map of the surroundings of Emden city (by Ubbo Emmius):
http://www.heimatkun...ollart_1616.jpg


But I have searched these maps for more than an hour by now, and found nothing even remotely similar to Lumka-makia.

==

Like I said just now to Puzzler, we all think Oostvlieland is (in) Oost Friesland or the German Ostfriesland, but we may be looking in the wrong place.

Btw, I found some explanations for Lumke and similar names:

Lymke afgeleid van Limme (Volk) >> Lymke, derived from Limme (people/folk)
Limke afgeleid van Limme (Volk) >> Limke, deribed from Limme (people/folk)
Lemke afgeleid van Lam (Bos) >>> Lemke, derived from Lam (woods/forest)

.

Edited by Abramelin, 10 October 2011 - 02:56 PM.


#6550    Abramelin

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 03:09 PM

Queen Wanda and the Curse of Wicholf

  
The geological history of Vlieland is closely connected to that of the whole northern Dutch coastal area. Once the island was a part of a coastal barrier that was formed in a period known as the Old-Holocene, which lasted from 20,000 till about 5,000 years BC. In this period, succeeding the last great ice age, sea level rose as a result of the melting arctic ice, and the Dutch lowlands were flooded every now and then. Finally the sea broke through the coastal barrier and formed a permanently inundated area, the present Wadden Sea. The remains of the coastal barrier now form the range of Wadden islands, extending from Den Helder in Holland to Esbjerg in Denmark.

Although this genesis does not really differ from that of the neighboring islands of Texel, Terschelling, Ameland and Schiermonnikoog, is does have something special. Like that old legend suggesting that is was not solely the violent forces of wind and water that caused Vlieland to become an island. It's the legend of Queen Wanda, who is supposed to have lived here in the late Middle Ages. A beautiful story that deserves to be told at this place.

It was about 1230 when Count William II of Holland granted the area of nowadays Vlieland, still forming part of the mainland at that time, to the monastery of Ludinga near Achlum, in the vicinity of the present town of Harlingen. In the following years the monks started digging a canal to the sea, primarily to improve the drainage of the land, but also to make their monastery accessible by ship from the sea. But at the place where the projected canal was to flow into the sea there lived, according to the legend, the pagan queen Wanda, together with her son Worp. She was the widow of Hessel of Wicholf the Saxon who once ruled this area, and she strongly opposed the digging of the canal right through here property, although Count William had granted the monks permission to do so.

The monk Bouwe, in charge with the supervision of the work, did not let himself be stopped by Wanda's resistance. Nor was he alarmed by a warning of the local Vlieland people about the 'Curse of Wicholf'. It was predicted that, when fratricide would occur twice in the Wicholf clan, the sea would flood Vlieland. A part of that prophecy was already fulfilled, as one of Wanda's sons named Hengst had killed his brother Horse in a quarrel.

Friar Bouwe didn't worry about that prophecy. After all, Wanda had only one son left as her fourth child, the eldest son Runo, had disappeared without a trace many years earlier at the age of three while he was playing on the ice, and never found back. So, how could another fratricide occur? In good spirits he went on with the work on.

On the day that the canal was almost finished and just one dune remained to be cut through, it came to an argument with Wanda's son Worp. It escalated to such an extend that Worp, provoked by his mother to take action against friar Bouwe and his canal, stabbed the monk to death with his knife, after which he fled home.

The abbot of the monastery who found friar Bouwe recognized the knife and shortly after Worp and his mother were fetched from their house and brought before the tribunal. When Wanda saw Bouwe's dead body she got the shock of her life, as under his habit the dead monk wore a string of shells like the one that she once had hung around the neck of her missing son Runo. When she asked where that string came from the abbot told her about a little boy that the monks had once rescued from an ice floe. They had taken the child to the monastery where he grew up and later he was admitted in the monastic order as Friar Bouwe. At that moment Wanda began screaming like mad: "Woe is me! The curse of Wicholf's house has come! The prophecy is fulfilled!".

The lawsuit was broken off. Worp entered the monastery as a penitent. And when shortly after the mouth of the canal had been dug and the first waves of the sea rolled into the land Wanda ran into the sea with her arms spread out, as in an attempt to stop the water, and disappeared forever.
  
The element of truth in this legend is the fact that there was an extensive flood in the year 1237 or 1314, when the sea broke through the dunes, Vlieland was cut off from Texel and became a separate island. The water poured into the land so far that even Harlingen became a coastal town. This flood may indeed be caused by a canal that was dug by the monks of Ludinga, the so-called 'Monnickesloot'. After these events, Vlieland appears in documents under the name 'Insula Fle' or 'the island on the Flevo stream', from which the present name of Vlieland may be derived.

On Vlieland there is only one small town named Oost-Vlieland, first mentioned in a protocol of 1245. But at that time there was a second town on the west point of the island, appropriately named West-Vlieland, which initially was of much greater importance. In the 17th century it had a population of over 3,000. Whale fishing was the main living and over 70 whaling commanders lived there. But nowadays nothing remains of West-Vlieland. The town suffered heavily from the drifting dune sands and the ceaseless attacks by the sea. After large floods in 1717 and 1727 the town was abandoned and finally it was completely swallowed by the sea. Oost-Vlieland, safely sheltered by the 40-meters high Vuurboetsduin (Beaconfire Dune) was since then the only town on the island.

The palmy days of Vlieland were between 1650 and 1750, coinciding with the Golden Age of Holland. During that period the Vlieland Roads were, like those of the neighboring island of Texel, a major meeting point for ships that sailed out from there to all quarters of the world. Also cargo from far-away countries was transferred here into smaller ships for further transport to Zuyder Zee ports where the bigger ships could not go. In the wake of mercantile shipping all kinds of industry settled in Oost-Vlieland like pilot services, ships repair and maintenance, equipment and provisioning and, of course, all the necessary conveniences for the ships' crews during their temporary stay on the island.


http://islas.ruudbijlsma.nl/vl_en.htm


+++++++++++++++++


As I have said long ago, I had the feeling the writers of the OLB gave several famous gods and persons a 'sex-change'.


Wanda \wa(n)-da\ as a girl's name is pronounced WAHN-dah. It is of Slavic origin, and the meaning of Wanda is "the tribe of the Vandals". The Vandals (or Wendlas) were an ancient Slavonic tribe whose destructive behavior led to the modern term "vandalism". Also possibly (Old German) "wanderer". Harpsichord player Wanda Landowska.

Wanda has 15 variant forms: Vanda, Wahnda, Wandah, Wandie, Wandis, Wandy, Wannda, Wenda, Wendaline, Wendall, Wendeline, Wendy, Wohnda, Wonda and Wonnda.


http://www.thinkbaby...meaning/0/Wanda

The name is popularly interpreted as meaning "wanderer."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wanda


And what was one of the many known nicknames of Wodan/Odin? "The Wanderer".

You know, the OLB "Wodan" who lived on Oostvlieland with his parents? Only the Wanda of the legend lived on Westvlieland which is no more.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 10 October 2011 - 03:26 PM.


#6551    Abramelin

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 06:04 PM

Anyone remember the OLB Konered? Father Frethorik? Mother named Wiljo (pronounced "Wilyo")?

I found a King Conrad, father named Friedrich, mother named Yolande ("Queen of Jerusalem"), living in medieval Europe, Germany (and Tyre/Lebanon).

The OLB Wiljo had another son, "Hachgana".

Now that doesn't sound much German/Frisian, right?

My name is Wiljo. I am the maiden who came home with him from Saxsenmarken. In the course of conversation , and we became man and wife. He left me with five children, two sons and three daughters. Konreed was my eldest son, Hachgana my second. My eldest daughter is called Adela, my second Frulik, and the youngest Nocht. When I went to Saxsenmarken I preserved three books—the book of songs, the book of narratives, and the Hellenia book.

The Conrad and Yolande I found out about were being accused of incest and this is from what I quoted before, "it came out that we were both of Adela’s race — thus our affection commenced"

"Hachgana" means "defender" in Hebrew: "Hachana". And the -ch- is that gutteral consonant not many other people - aside from the Scots, Hebrews, Arabs and Dutch - are able to pronounce, heh), aka - "g".

Google, and be 'enlightened', lol.

Too many hints and 'coincidences' too ignore.

Now you find me a Frisian "Hachgana", and I will admit I was wrong. But you will have a hard time finding that name in Frisian or German records, lol.

"Hachgana" is a real Hebrew name or word, and no surprize a mother, who was Queen of Jerusalem named her son that way.

Think about that one, and remember how many times I have mentioned "hints" and clues.

For me this whole thing, the background of the OLB, is nothing but a puzzle I'd like to solve.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 10 October 2011 - 06:55 PM.


#6552    Knul

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:01 PM

Hachgana = Hagano, a well-known person in Dutch history. See this text from Wikipedia.

Hagano[1] was a petty nobleman (mediocris) who achieved influence in Lotharingia and West Francia during the rule of Charles the Simple (898–922). He was a relative of Charles' first wife, Frederuna, and was originally from Lotharingia. Though Frederuna had died in 917, by 918 Hagano had become the king's favourite and his most trusted advisor. The aristocracy despised him, however, and the authority of Charles over the nobles was severely weakened by Hagano's presence at court.[2]

In 919 the West Frankish barons refused to assist the king in repelling a Magyar invasion.[2] One of the leading Lotharingian barons, Gilbert, threw his support behind Henry the Fowler, the German king, and, according to Flodoard, was elected "prince" (princeps) by the Lotharingian aristocracy.[3] Flodoard also records that Robert of Neustria made a treaty with the Vikings without royal permission. Charles' sin appears to be transferring grants in benefice, especially of monasteries, from his barons to Hagano.[3] When, in 922, he granted Hagano Chelles, at that time already held by Rothilde, a daughter of Charles the Bald, the barons of West Francia revolted and made Robert king in Charles' place.

French historian Charles Bémont edited a document (#5 in manuscript 9016 of the Bibliothèque nationale de France) for the pièces justificatives of his biography of Simon de Montfort in which a baron reminds Henry III of England of what happened to "Charles l'Assoté" when he listened too closely to unpopular advisors.[4]

[edit] Primary sources
Flodoardi Annales, ed. Georg Pertz.

[edit] Notes

1.^ On his name, see Haguna.
2.^ a b Jean Dunbabin, "West Francia: The Kingdom", The New Cambridge Medieval History, III: c. 900–c. 1024, ed. Timothy Reuter‎ (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 378–79.
3.^ a b Michel Parisse, "Lotharingia", The New Cambridge Medieval History, III: c. 900–c. 1024, ed. Timothy Reuter‎ (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 314.
4.^ Simon de Montfort: comte de Leicester, sa vie (120?–1265) son rôle politique en France et en Angleterre (Paris: 1884), 341.


#6553    Abramelin

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:09 PM

View PostKnul, on 10 October 2011 - 07:01 PM, said:

Hachgana = Hagano, a well-known person in Dutch history. See this text from Wikipedia.

Hagano[1] was a petty nobleman (mediocris) who achieved influence in Lotharingia and West Francia during the rule of Charles the Simple (898–922). He was a relative of Charles' first wife, Frederuna, and was originally from Lotharingia. Though Frederuna had died in 917, by 918 Hagano had become the king's favourite and his most trusted advisor. The aristocracy despised him, however, and the authority of Charles over the nobles was severely weakened by Hagano's presence at court.[2]

In 919 the West Frankish barons refused to assist the king in repelling a Magyar invasion.[2] One of the leading Lotharingian barons, Gilbert, threw his support behind Henry the Fowler, the German king, and, according to Flodoard, was elected "prince" (princeps) by the Lotharingian aristocracy.[3] Flodoard also records that Robert of Neustria made a treaty with the Vikings without royal permission. Charles' sin appears to be transferring grants in benefice, especially of monasteries, from his barons to Hagano.[3] When, in 922, he granted Hagano Chelles, at that time already held by Rothilde, a daughter of Charles the Bald, the barons of West Francia revolted and made Robert king in Charles' place.

French historian Charles Bémont edited a document (#5 in manuscript 9016 of the Bibliothèque nationale de France) for the pièces justificatives of his biography of Simon de Montfort in which a baron reminds Henry III of England of what happened to "Charles l'Assoté" when he listened too closely to unpopular advisors.[4]

[edit] Primary sources
Flodoardi Annales, ed. Georg Pertz.

[edit] Notes

1.^ On his name, see Haguna.
2.^ a b Jean Dunbabin, "West Francia: The Kingdom", The New Cambridge Medieval History, III: c. 900–c. 1024, ed. Timothy Reuter‎ (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 378–79.
3.^ a b Michel Parisse, "Lotharingia", The New Cambridge Medieval History, III: c. 900–c. 1024, ed. Timothy Reuter‎ (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 314.
4.^ Simon de Montfort: comte de Leicester, sa vie (120?–1265) son rôle politique en France et en Angleterre (Paris: 1884), 341.


OK, so there really was a 'someone' with a name resembling "Hagchana": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagano

I admitt I had no idea about that.

But now you admit to me: "Hagchana" sounds VERY Hebrew, and that is no surprize if this WilYO, or YOlande was the "Queen of Jerusalem".


And again... if you are right... we have yet another link to the Vikings.


Btw: "Hagano" is NOT a 'wellknown' person in Dutch history at all. What ever made you say that??


.

Edited by Abramelin, 10 October 2011 - 07:16 PM.


#6554    Knul

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:18 PM

You remember, that I link the OLB to the Rijmkroniek van Klaas Kolyn. I foud another interesting link with regard to Svder-rên-mvda - zuiderhaven van Stavoren p. 86

Kolyn: Toe nu Aernout, als Greve, / [640] 't Swaert hadde opgeheven / In zin Vaders plaets overwaer, / Ente i fan te Friesen skaer / To Sudermuda wolde gangen, / Na kostume, 't Schilt ontfangen; / [645] Spraken zi overluut: / Zi ne wilden van em gebruut / Niet sien nochte em hulden, / Nochte zine dwanch gedulden.


#6555    Knul

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:25 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 10 October 2011 - 07:09 PM, said:

OK, so there really was a 'someone' with a name resembling "Hagchana": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagano

I admitt I had no idea about that.

But now you admit to me: "Hagchana" sounds VERY Hebrew, and that is no surprize if this WilYO, or YOlande was the "Queen of Jerusalem".


And again... if you are right... we have yet another link to the Vikings.


Btw: "Hagano" is NOT a 'wellknown' person in Dutch history at all. What ever made you say that??


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For those, who are interested in the history of the Dutch counts the name is very famiiar. Here a next quote from the Rijmkroniek:

Dees goedardige Koning Karel / [500] Gaf naamaals binnen korten tyd / Te Bladelle, in het jaar / Negenhonderd en drieëntwintig daarenboven,/ Al het overige, ’t gene hy bezat / [505] In ’t gebied van Dirk. / Tot eenen erfhaftigen eygendom / Het hier voore geroerde in vreede. / Op ’t verzoek van Graaf Hagano / De kerk tot Egmond zynde, / [510] Met al der zelven Geestlyk gebied. / ’t Gene grensde tegen Fortrape / En Kinheym, als men ziet. / Hierby heeft hy ook verkreegen / Eene gift uyt hoofde / [515] Van zyne vrou Hildegaard / (Welke hem Arnoud heeft gebaard / Te Gent in haare Moogendheyd ) / Dat zy mede zoude voegen / Het Bosch Wasda / [520] ’T meest in haer landgebied, / Aan zyn Graaffschap, als voorheen, / Met al wat ‘er toe mogt behooren. / Dit gaf hem Lodewyk uyt liefde / Om zyne vrou Hemma, de Koningin.

You will find this Hagano also in the famous Vaderlandsche Geschiedenis by Jan Wagenaar. The Frisian count Dirk I received the goods to defend the land against the vikings.

Edited by Knul, 10 October 2011 - 07:33 PM.