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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#9136    Otharus

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 11:52 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 30 December 2011 - 10:19 AM, said:

I just found out Overwijn really transliterated every underscore and point in the text too.
...
But what he also did (I removed it from the quote) is give a name like "âst. flyy.land" an extra -y- to stress the way it should be pronounced according to him:  -yy- is pronounced as (English) -ee- (in Dutch it would be -ie- ).
Jensma (2006) and De Heer (2008) both made new transliterations (I have found minor mistakes in both).

Sample of full two pages Jensma:
Posted Image
1. photocopy of original manuscript
2. transliteration
3. three columns for different types of footnotes
4. Dutch 'translation' (not one I am happy with)

Sample of transliteration Jensma:
Posted Image

Sample of transliteration/ translation De Heer:
Posted Image
With footnotes on the bottom of every page.

I have asked Alewyn for his translation and am thinking about how I would like to present a combination of:
1. photocopy of original
2. transliteration (normal capitals)
3. English translation
4. footnotes

Online and/or in print.


#9137    Abramelin

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 12:53 PM

I think I prefer Jensma's transliteration because - judging from what you posted - he kept the lines at the original length including breaks, tildes and all. Also I think his use of the capital 'eth', or Đ is really handy.


#9138    Abramelin

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 01:43 PM

Thinking about it a bit more, I am now sure I prefer Jensma's work (some screenshots from his online book):

Posted Image

Posted Image

He has added comments about letters that have been changed for another, mistakes, and unclear letters.

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Edited by Abramelin, 30 December 2011 - 01:46 PM.


#9139    Otharus

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 02:16 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 30 December 2011 - 12:53 PM, said:

I think I prefer Jensma's transliteration because - judging from what you posted - he kept the lines at the original length including breaks, tildes and all. Also I think his use of the capital 'eth', or Đ is really handy.
Yes a consequent line-numbering is handy, but for my personal study I also like to separate sentences.
That letter is OK for print-version, but a normal keyboard doesn't have it; for an online version it would not be good (how to do a word search?).

Here's an experiment (this time not aimed at providing smooth translation, but for study of the language):

Posted Image


#9140    Abramelin

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 02:52 PM

View PostOtharus, on 30 December 2011 - 02:16 PM, said:

Yes a consequent line-numbering is handy, but for my personal study I also like to separate sentences.
That letter is OK for print-version, but a normal keyboard doesn't have it; for an online version it would not be good (how to do a word search?).

Here's an experiment (this time not aimed at providing smooth translation, but for study of the language):

Posted Image

I don't have a special keyboard at all: Đ.

I got it with [CAPS LOCK]  and then [rightside - ALT] [D].

==

Your experiment looks ok, but I think maybe you could leave out the part bottom-left; it looks redundant.

(funny I never saw it, lol: "ethlum", shouldn't that be translated as "nobility" (Dutch: edelen) ?? )


++++

EDIT:

Word search is no problem withe the eth: check this screenshot of a Wiki page; I highlighted all the upper- and lowercase eths:


Attached File  ETH-highlighted.jpg   103.67K   7 downloads
.

Edited by Abramelin, 30 December 2011 - 02:59 PM.


#9141    Otharus

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 04:13 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 30 December 2011 - 02:52 PM, said:

I don't have a special keyboard at all: Đ.
I got it with [CAPS LOCK]  and then [rightside - ALT] [D].
On the keyboard I'm working with now, that doesn't work, but there must be a way.

Psychologically, for people who are new to this, it might make the threshold higher when uncommon letters are used. Either way, I'm fine with it.

Quote

Your experiment looks ok, but I think maybe you could leave out the part bottom-left; it looks redundant.
Yeah, I just thought it might be easier for beginners (and dyslectics). I work with a file myself with the original text only, and I let every new sentence start on a new line, makes it easier to read and concentrate. For now it's a little effort. In a print-version I would probably not include both.

Quote

(funny I never saw it, lol: "ethlum", shouldn't that be translated as "nobility" (Dutch: edelen) ?? )
According to Hettema, "ethla" can both mean "edelen" (nobility) as ancestors.

But in OLB, the context seems to indicate that it (originally?) just means ancestors.

Nobility might be a later meaning.

I guess the word is related to "ath".


#9142    Otharus

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 04:54 PM

View PostOtharus, on 30 December 2011 - 02:16 PM, said:

Here's an experiment (this time not aimed at providing smooth translation, but for study of the language):

Posted Image

Experiment part 2:

Posted Image


#9143    Otharus

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:32 PM

View PostOtharus, on 30 December 2011 - 04:54 PM, said:

Experiment part 2:
Posted Image

And part 3:

Posted Image


#9144    Alewyn

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 06:16 PM

Whilst you are on the subject of the OLB's translation:

I have been wanting to share this little thought for some time now (Ever since Otharus pointed out that "Pompa Bleder" did not mean "Pumpkin Leafs" but rather "Water Lily Leafs")

The OLB describes the civil war that broke out between Minerva’s and Syrhed’s followers in ca. 1630 BC. One of the main reasons was the fact that Minerva’s followers started making paper from “pompa bledar” or water lily leafs (Nuphar lutea) instead of from flax, thereby destroying one of the main sources of income of Syrhed’s followers.

The results of the war were that the Fryan Federation broke up, the Celts came into being and the foundations of the later Greek Civilization were laid.

This little leaf, which appears on the Frisian flag today, radically changed world history.  

I shall think about this every time I see the Frisian flag.

Edited by Alewyn, 30 December 2011 - 06:18 PM.


#9145    Abramelin

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 09:29 PM

View PostAlewyn, on 30 December 2011 - 06:16 PM, said:

Whilst you are on the subject of the OLB's translation:

I have been wanting to share this little thought for some time now (Ever since Otharus pointed out that "Pompa Bleder" did not mean "Pumpkin Leafs" but rather "Water Lily Leafs")

The OLB describes the civil war that broke out between Minerva’s and Syrhed’s followers in ca. 1630 BC. One of the main reasons was the fact that Minerva’s followers started making paper from “pompa bledar” or water lily leafs (Nuphar lutea) instead of from flax, thereby destroying one of the main sources of income of Syrhed’s followers.

The results of the war were that the Fryan Federation broke up, the Celts came into being and the foundations of the later Greek Civilization were laid.

This little leaf, which appears on the Frisian flag today, radically changed world history.  

I shall think about this every time I see the Frisian flag.

Yes, I think it sounds very reasonable that the leafs in the Frisian flag had some kind of special meaning.

Pumpkin leaves? Nah, rather water lily leaves, or "pompa bleder". That was a good find by Otharus.

I hope you also read what I posted, about someone asking online how to make paper from the pulp of water lilies for some school project.

But Puzz's idea that these leaves (red colored in the Frisian flag) may also symbolize hearts is not not crazy either.

Why would someone depict leaves in red? Maybe because these leaves do indeed resemble a heart? Leaves that had some kind of important meaning to the Frisians?





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#9146    Abramelin

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 09:49 PM

But now for something completely different...

I want to stress this: any transliteration into Latin script (=our script) should stick to the original length of the lines in the manuscript, with commas, periods, tildes, line-breaks and all.

It might make it somewhat harder to read (and Otharus already added more readable versions of some pages, the ones I said were redundant), but we cannot be sure - skeptics and believers alike - where some lines (and/or words) end or start.

===

The "something completely different" thing is this: if you consider this manuscript to be a fabrication for some purpose, there might be some sort of code hidden in it.

===

Even more "completely different" (and probably quite crazy, lol), I thought by myself, "What sort of code would someone interested in astrology/astronomy/navigating the seas want to hide within the text?"

I had to think of coordinates...

And the first numbers that show up in the OLB are these: 3449 and 1256:

Written at Liuwert, in the three thousand four hundred and forty-ninth year after Atland was submerged—that is, according to the Christian reckoning, the year 1256.

Hiddo, surnamed Over de Linda.—Watch.


Well, have fun with this: http://www.mapquest....esultId=latlong

34N49
12E56
east of Tunesia in the Med


12N56
34E49
SUDAN

12S56
34E49
east coast Lake Nyasa/northern Mozambique

decimal degrees:
34,49N
12,56E

And so on.

(Btw: do not forget about 'right ascension' and 'declination' of stars/planets.)


.

Edited by Abramelin, 30 December 2011 - 10:02 PM.


#9147    The Puzzler

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 11:36 PM

View Postgranpa, on 30 December 2011 - 05:47 AM, said:

surely the horns represent the crescent moon.

http://religion.wiki.../wiki/AuĂ°umbla

http://religion.wiki...iki/Gavaevodata

the primordial ox is a hermaphrodite, having both milk (Ibd 43.15) and semen (Ibd 94.4).
I thought so at first but I believe the Solar Bull is mentioned - because of what might be ra/red and the golden horns. Even if it's not the golden horns seem more relative to the Sun cow in Egypt (as the Magyar were like Egyptian priests) and the continuation of the Apis bull, Serapis and the whole connection to the Sun and Christianity, rather than the Lunar Bull.

Posted Image
The cult of Osiris promised eternal life to those deemed morally worthy. Originally the justified dead, male or female, became an Osiris but by early Roman times females became identified with Hathor and men with Osiris
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hathor

Anyway as Abe said, I guess it's not that important, but in the context of history, I'd say the Solar Cow came into Northern Europe from the East.

-----------------
Hathor, along with the goddess Nut, was associated with the Milky Way during the third millennium B.C. when, during the fall and spring equinoxes, it aligned over and touched the earth where the sun rose and fell.[12] The four legs of the celestial cow represented Nut or Hathor could, in one account, be seen as the pillars on which the sky was supported with the stars on their bellies constituting the milky way on which the solar barque of Ra, representing the sun, sailed.[13] An alternate name for Hathor, which persisted for 3,000 years, was Mehturt (also spelt Mehurt, Mehet-Weret, and Mehet-uret), meaning 'great flood, a direct reference to her being the milky way.


The Pythagoreans say the fall of Phaethon created the Milky Way, as above explained, in the 3rd millenium - the Milky Way touched the Earth as the Sun fell. Hathor as Mehturt, meant 'great flood'.

Edited by The Puzzler, 30 December 2011 - 11:52 PM.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#9148    granpa

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 04:51 AM

you realize that the 'sun' in that picture is actually a snake dont you?

snake = lightening = light = sun

I have cooked you a meal, cut it into little pieces, and set it before you  but I'm not going to chew it for you
And no one is forcing you to eat it. If you dont want it then dont eat it.

I am not a big believer in science by combat.
Arguing doesn't establish who is right. Arguing only establishes who is the better arguer.

#9149    Knul

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 05:45 AM

View PostAbramelin, on 30 December 2011 - 09:49 PM, said:

But now for something completely different...

I want to stress this: any transliteration into Latin script (=our script) should stick to the original length of the lines in the manuscript, with commas, periods, tildes, line-breaks and all.

It might make it somewhat harder to read (and Otharus already added more readable versions of some pages, the ones I said were redundant), but we cannot be sure - skeptics and believers alike - where some lines (and/or words) end or start.

===

The "something completely different" thing is this: if you consider this manuscript to be a fabrication for some purpose, there might be some sort of code hidden in it.

===

Even more "completely different" (and probably quite crazy, lol), I thought by myself, "What sort of code would someone interested in astrology/astronomy/navigating the seas want to hide within the text?"

I had to think of coordinates...

And the first numbers that show up in the OLB are these: 3449 and 1256:

Written at Liuwert, in the three thousand four hundred and forty-ninth year after Atland was submerged—that is, according to the Christian reckoning, the year 1256.

Hiddo, surnamed Over de Linda.—Watch.


Well, have fun with this: http://www.mapquest....esultId=latlong

34N49
12E56
east of Tunesia in the Med


12N56
34E49
SUDAN

12S56
34E49
east coast Lake Nyasa/northern Mozambique

decimal degrees:
34,49N
12,56E

And so on.

(Btw: do not forget about 'right ascension' and 'declination' of stars/planets.)


.


Let us hope, that you do not take yourself seriously with this.


#9150    The Puzzler

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 06:22 AM

View Postgranpa, on 31 December 2011 - 04:51 AM, said:

you realize that the 'sun' in that picture is actually a snake dont you?

snake = lightening = light = sun
The uraeus was the image of the Egyptian cobra (Naja haje), worn in the front of the king's headdress. Here the snake represents the snake goddess Wadjet, associated with the Lower Egyptian sanctuary of Buto. Her counterpart was the vulture goddess Nekhbet of Hierakonpolis in Upper Egypt. Wadjet acted as a mythical mother and midwife of the king. At Tuna el-Gebel, mummified cobras have been found amongst the millions of other animals in the great animal catacombs.
http://www.touregypt...akesofegypt.htm

In an mmm bop it's gone...