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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


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#9691    Van Gorp

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 10:22 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 25 January 2012 - 02:59 PM, said:

Well, we will never be sure where the name came from, but this explanation makes a lot of sense (see former post):


Europa, Europe comes from the Phoenician word EROB, meaning where the sun set (west of Phoenicia,west of Bosphorus, Sea of Marmora). Erebo: I go under. Ereba: The land where I go under. Acu (pronounciatian asu) the land where I (the sun) are coming up: Ereb, ereba= europa Asu = Asie, Asia. Morningland-Eveningland, seen by the Phoeniciers That's why Bosphorus always has been the geographical border between Europe and Asia. Anatolie /= Asia-minor,which forms 97% of todays Turkey, comes from greeche language and means : east, east of what ? East of European Greece!

Hans Thijssens, Amsterdam Netherlands




Anatolia (from Greek Ἀνατολή Anatolē — "east" or "(sun)rise"; also Asia Minor, from Greek: Μικρὰ Ἀσία Mikrá Asía "small Asia"; in modern Turkish: Anadolu) is a geographic and historical term denoting the westernmost protrusion of Asia, comprising the majority of the Republic of Turkey.
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Now, this is a fascinating point.  
I sincerely try to find an explanation in all this for the words that are used.  

The older, the simpler no?
What parts stand for what?  Ereba (land? sun? under?), Asu (land? sun? up?).

What if
- Asia comes from As-Sie, meaning looking at the water.
- Afrika comes from Affer-Yck, meaning Far (af, seperated) from d'Yck (Border, coast)
- Lybia comes from Li-by, meaning Being situated (liggen) close (nabij)

Very odd maybe, but goes for an explaination of the words used to de-scribe (om-schrijven).


Posted Image
Just a rare coincidence I found the above.  
T and D in beginning of f.e. Latin words could evenso be derived from short articles/place indications (de, het, te, ter, an ...) before the main word used in the Scytisch base language -> mostly referred as an uncertain origin of PIE.


#9692    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 07:34 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 25 January 2012 - 03:24 PM, said:

No, this part:

This is the history of Jon and of Min-erva.

When they had finished their story they asked respectfully for iron weapons; for, said they, our foes are powerful, but if we have good arms we can withstand them. When this had been agreed to, the people asked if Frya's customs would flourish in Athens and in other parts of Greece (Krekalanden). The mother answered, If the distant Greeks belong to the direct descent of Frya, then they will flourish; but if they do not descend from Frya, then there will be a long contention about it, because the carrier must make five thousand revolutions of his Juul before Finda's people will be ripe for liberty.

This is Nyhellenia/Minerva who said that - so Mother Hel-licht would be her as well, Nyhellenia by this time may have become Mother Hel-licht - clear/light (of wisdom).

I noticed Overwijn even translated it as "Moeder Hellenia".

I stay with "hel-licht" as an adverb.


#9693    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:13 AM

View PostVan Gorp, on 25 January 2012 - 10:22 PM, said:

Now, this is a fascinating point.  
I sincerely try to find an explanation in all this for the words that are used.  

The older, the simpler no?
What parts stand for what?  Ereba (land? sun? under?), Asu (land? sun? up?).

What if
- Asia comes from As-Sie, meaning looking at the water.
- Afrika comes from Affer-Yck, meaning Far (af, seperated) from d'Yck (Border, coast)
- Lybia comes from Li-by, meaning Being situated (liggen) close (nabij)

Very odd maybe, but goes for an explaination of the words used to de-scribe (om-schrijven).


Posted Image
Just a rare coincidence I found the above.  
T and D in beginning of f.e. Latin words could evenso be derived from short articles/place indications (de, het, te, ter, an ...) before the main word used in the Scytisch base language -> mostly referred as an uncertain origin of PIE.


Hmmm.. I assume you are also familiar with Evert Jan Poorterman and Willem Berend Hietbrink.


#9694    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 11:25 AM

I think the Over de Linden family, the Fryans and the OLB have a contender to the throne:


The Lords of Navarre - José Lacambra-Loizu (from the book's Preface, page xxiii)

During a recent visit to my ancestral home in the Spanish Pyrenees, I happened across a sixteenth century manuscript claiming family roots that dated back to "time immemorial." This startling discovery encouraged me to anchor this chronicle in the prehistoric past, describing a journey spanning the last glacial age to the present. It narrates the meandering of a family of Vascon warlords, the Agorretas, as they grope their way out of the prehistoric mists and into the glare of history.

The account begins during the brief warming spell of the Pandorf Interstadial, some forty-thousand years ago. A band of nomadic hunters abandons its Caucasian caves to pursue the big game, which has retreated to the northern tundra following the receding ice cap. As the weather turns cold again, during the peak of the Würm glaciation some twenty thousand years later, the big game and its pursuers retreat south, keeping one step ahead of the advancing ice sheet. The hunters seek shelter in caves at the foot of both the Massif Central and the Pyrenees and leave their artistic imprint in cave paintings along the way.

As this band of Vascon hunters finally surfaces into history, we see them rub reluctant elbows with Celts, join the Roman legions in the Rhine, tangle with Charlemagne at Roncevaux, and fight North African Muslims in battles from Covadonga to al-Andalus, always fiercely defending their beloved Vascon valleys in the Pyrenean uplands. Later, and now at the cusp of the age of chivalry, an Agorreta participates in jousts, takes the Cross in the Lionheart's Crusade, and woos a Moorish princess whose brother he later helps defeat in the turning-point battle of Navas de Tolosa. Later still, now in the thick of the Middle Ages, another Agorreta crosses swords with the Black Prince at Crecy and later fights under the Englishman's banner at Nájera. Finally, during the twilight years of the Vascon kingdom of Navarre, several Agorretas attain Royal Judgeships, serve as Seneschals to kings and bear brave lances under Cesare Borgia. The chronicle ends on the eve of the annexation of a once fiercely independent Vasconia to the nascent kingdom of Spain.

Although generous literary license is taken when narrating prehistoric events, actual family names and events are cited whenever historical records exist. Thus, although the early Agorretas described in this chronicle are fictional, the later characters did, in fact, leave their imprint in Navarran history as borne out in Navarre's heraldic records.


http://www.buber.net...s/jml040624.php

http://www.amazon.co...dp/0595311482#_

The book is a sort of novel created around what is known of (or assumed about) prehistory. For me the only intriguing part is the sentence I underlined.

On Amazon.com you can read the Preface.

++++++

EDIT:

It's also on Booksgoogle:

http://books.google....epage&q&f=false

Again: it is fiction.

But if anyone knows what that "sixteenth century manuscript" is the writer claims to have seen, I'd like to know it too.


.

Edited by Abramelin, 26 January 2012 - 11:46 AM.


#9695    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 03:47 PM

The OLB Manuscript ~ part 1 of 11

Translated from 19th century (1875) Dutch into 21st century (2012) Dutch and English

Posted Image

Nederlands

Het OERA LINDA Handschrift

Familie Over de Linden in Den Helder heeft een oud handschrift, waarvan schrift, taal en inhoud onbekend zijn.

Het was overgeleverd van geslacht tot geslacht met de aanbeveling het zorgvuldig te bewaren, als een familie-erfstuk.

De eigenaar vermoede dat het in Oud-Fries was geschreven en informatie over verre voorouders zou bevatten.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

English

The OERA LINDA Manuscript

The Over de Linden family in Den Helder has an old manuscript, of which script, language and content are unknown.

It was passed on from generation to generation, with the advice to keep it with care, as a family-treasure.

The owner thought it was written in Old-Frisian, and that it might contain information about ancient ancestors.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Edited by Otharus, 26 January 2012 - 03:55 PM.


#9696    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:15 PM

The OLB Manuscript ~ part 2 of 11

Posted Image

Nederlands

Toen Doctor Eelco Verwijs, archivaris-bibliothecaris van Fryslân, hiervan hoorde, lichtte hij de overheid in.

Hij kreeg opdracht het te onderzoeken.

Op 17 december 1867 gaf hij een verslag van zijn eerste conclusies.

De eigenaar heeft hem toestemming gegeven het handschrift te transcriberen en vertalen.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

English

When Doctor Eelco Verwijs, archivist-biblothecarian of Fryslân, heard about this, he informed the government.

He was instructed to examine it.

On 17 December 1867 he reported his first conclusions.

The owner has given him permission to transcribe and translate the manuscript.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Edited by Otharus, 26 January 2012 - 04:15 PM.


#9697    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:31 PM

View PostOtharus, on 21 January 2012 - 08:45 AM, said:

St. Catherine with the (broken) Wheel in the Bonifatius-church Leeuwarden:

Posted Image

De kerk werd tussen 1882 en 1884 gebouwd / The church was built between 1882 and 1884.

http://nl.wikipedia....rk_(Leeuwarden)

Maybe the painting was inspired by that patron goddess "Hammonia" of Hamburg?

Posted Image

View PostAbramelin, on 02 January 2012 - 02:54 PM, said:

Yes, a steering wheel... but Hamburg happens to be a port.

Briefly annexed by Napoleon I (1810-14), Hamburg suffered severely during his last campaign in Germany. The city was besieged for over a year by Allied forces (mostly Russian, Swedish and German). Russian forces under General Bennigsen finally freed the city in 1814. During the first half of the 19th century a patron goddess with Hamburg's Latin name Hammonia emerged, mostly in romantic and poetic references, and although she has no mythology to call her own, Hammonia became the symbol of the city's spirit during this time.

http://www.german-ar...ANY/G-HH/HH.htm

http://www.unexplain...2

And Leeuwarden was a port, ages ago (at the east coast of the Middelzee).

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Edited by Abramelin, 26 January 2012 - 04:34 PM.


#9698    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:32 PM

The OLB Manuscript ~ part 3 of 11

Posted Image

Nederlands

Het was te danken aan de volhardende bezieling en zorg van Doctor Jan Ottema, dat de inhoud begrepen en vertaald werd.

Hij deed uitvoerig verslag van zijn nauwkeurig onderzoek in een vergadering van het Fries Genootschap op 10 februari 1871.

Dit verslag werd gedrukt en verspreid, en leidde tot een grote belangstelling voor dit merkwaardige stuk.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

English

Thanks to the persevering zeal and care of Doctor Jan Ottema, the content was understood and translated.

In detail he reported the results of his accurate examination in a meeting of the Frisian Society on 10 February 1981.

This report was printed and distributed, and lead to a great common interest in this curious piece.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~


#9699    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:34 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 26 January 2012 - 04:31 PM, said:

Maybe inspired by that patron goddess "Hammonia" of Hamburg?
I find the broken six-spoked wheel rather interesting.


#9700    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:36 PM

View PostOtharus, on 26 January 2012 - 04:34 PM, said:

I find the broken six-spoked wheel rather interesting.

What's the story behind the painting?


#9701    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:43 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 26 January 2012 - 04:36 PM, said:

What's the story behind the painting?
It his hanging on a prominent place, at the entrance, of this church in Leeuwarden.


#9702    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 04:47 PM

View PostOtharus, on 26 January 2012 - 04:43 PM, said:

It his hanging on a prominent place, at the entrance, of this church in Leeuwarden.

Lol, that's not what I asked.

But I found the answer to my question:

Posted Image

The wheel was used as an instrument of torture because Catharina refused to marry Emperor Maxentius.

http://www.ronaldvan...paal-in-heusden

And here's the whole story in English:

An inventor offers the Emperor a uniquely tortuous instrument of death, a set of wheels spiked with knives, which would slice Catherine's body to bits from various angles simultaneously. Yet when she is bound to this device, angels miraculously release her. The spikes fly off, kill non-Christian onlookers and the wheel is destroyed. At this point, Maxentius has her beheaded. Milk rather than blood flows from her neck. Angels carry her body to Mount Sinai, where pilgrims have trekked since the 10th century.

http://www.kappagamm..._catherine.html

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Edited by Abramelin, 26 January 2012 - 04:52 PM.


#9703    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 05:51 PM

View PostOtharus, on 26 January 2012 - 04:32 PM, said:

Hij deed uitvoerig verslag van zijn nauwkeurig onderzoek in een vergadering van het Fries Genootschap op 10 februari 1871.

In detail he reported the results of his accurate examination in a meeting of the Frisian Society on 10 February 1981.
That should be 1871.


#9704    Abramelin

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 07:32 PM

Hmmm... nada, nothing, lol.

Anyway, you should not get excited everytime you see an image of some saint/goddess/woman with a wheel in her hands.

I don't think this Catherine was put on the 'wheel' because she was a Mother of the Frya kind (Yule Wheel).

And if you and I are able to dig up goddesses and saints holding a wheel (even a six-spoked wheel), then so could people from the 19th century.

And wasn't there a "Katherine" in the OLB, aka "Kat" or "Kaat"?

.

Edited by Abramelin, 26 January 2012 - 07:32 PM.


#9705    Otharus

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 08:01 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 26 January 2012 - 07:32 PM, said:

And wasn't there a "Katherine" in the OLB, aka "Kat" or "Kaat"?
There was, indeed...