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The Anu or Aunu People of Egypt


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#31    SlimJim22

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 10:18 AM

View PostThe Spartan, on 30 June 2010 - 03:08 AM, said:

I don't understand!!  :wacko:
Why get darker by tanning?
In Asian countries...people avoid getting in the sun if they could...because they get darker. (I do get dark if i stay out in the sun for long..but then i got sun block  ^_^ )

But why this fascination towards getting darker???

Something to do with melanin I assume. A while back I was looking into whether melanin had any function in a mystical sense. I have forgotten the conclusions I came to as with most things it quite ambiguous but I'll try and find them.

I have been reading some of them sites too and one quote that turns up is about cowardice being an attribute of those who were too black or too white, can't remember who it was from though.

... Oh that was probably it Khem meant black as in the black fertile soil but also as in alchemy. One of the stages of shamanic initiation is negredo. Heck I don't know but it does seem like the earliest pharoahs were black and that skin colour was orignally linked to divinity, not sure why though, possibly just that they came first. Man could well have lived a highly sophisticated culture without building with stone and living more at harmony with nature whether than be in treetops or on or around lakes. Some early peoples I have read about in Turkey lived in mound houses entering through the chimney like Santa Claus so this is another way that man could have lived without needing to build and leave traces of their existence.

Regarding the three pillars. Funny that they turn up in freemasonry aswell as buddhism, there are other places of course like the Egyptian sistrum or the trident of Poseidon and even the trinity.

Edited by SlimJim22, 30 June 2010 - 10:19 AM.

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#32    Abramelin

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 11:01 AM

View PostSlimJim22, on 30 June 2010 - 10:18 AM, said:

Something to do with melanin I assume. A while back I was looking into whether melanin had any function in a mystical sense. I have forgotten the conclusions I came to as with most things it quite ambiguous but I'll try and find them.



Yes, I remember having once read something along that line, long ago, but I don't know where. There was a ancient tribe that kept children in a dark cave for years because the people back then believed that that would enhance their psychic powers or something.  It's still being practised by the Kogi indians of Colombia in South America.

EDIT:

Everything about their history and religion is passed down through oral instructions and their lives are run by the spiritual leaders or Shamans named "Mamas." The Kogi Mamas are chosen from birth and spend the first nine years of childhood in a cave in total darkness learning the ancient secrets of the spiritual world or Aluna. They are the priests and judges who control Kogi society.

http://tierra-y-vida...rs-warning.html

EDIT:

And I guess that Jim is now interested... read all about the Kogi HERE


.

Edited by Abramelin, 30 June 2010 - 11:24 AM.


#33    questionmark

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 01:31 PM

View PostThe Spartan, on 30 June 2010 - 03:08 AM, said:

I don't understand!!  :wacko:
Why get darker by tanning?
In Asian countries...people avoid getting in the sun if they could...because they get darker. (I do get dark if i stay out in the sun for long..but then i got sun block  ^_^ )

But why this fascination towards getting darker???

Because you are less likely to get a sunburn tanned?

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#34    kmt_sesh

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 02:26 AM

View PostThe Spartan, on 30 June 2010 - 03:40 AM, said:

The egyptologist  Émile Clément Amélineau was the person who had first excavated at the temple at abydos.

one thing that interested me a lot was the following passage at a afro-centrist site.



Tomb of Osiris & Osiris' head being found in a canopic jar?? :wacko:
Osiris was Human? :mellow:

Anyone has any further info?

This is a mistranslation from Amélineau's original report in French. It wasn't Osiris' head they found in a jar, it was Osiris' hoagie. Sustenance for the afterlife, you know. :P

To be perfectly honest I am not familiar with Wayne Chandler's writing from which the afrocentric website drew that quote. I did some quick Googling and discovered within a few seconds that Chandler himself is evidently an afrocentrist, so I feel pretty comfortable in saying that the nature of this book is most likely dubious. More specifically, Chandler's "Of Gods and Men" is a chapter in a book called Egypt Revisited, edited by Ivan Van Sertima.

In any case, as you no doubt deduced for yourself, this business of Osiris' head having been found in a canopic jar is laughable nonsense, of course. It's actually just a spin on an "urban legend" of Egyptian archaeology. As the story goes, two men digging around at Giza found a very ancient-looking jar and removed the lid to find it filled with honey. Mmm, tasty treat! They sat in the shade and commenced to sample the honey, to see if was still good after millennia. It was in fact good, so they both dug in with gusto and gobbled down the ancient honey. They were horrified to find at the bottom of the jar a mummified human head. This never happened, either, of course. I think the yarn ultimately derives from the old story of how the body of Alexander the Great had been preserved in honey when Ptolemy I was bringing it back to Egypt for burial.

The tomb of Osiris is, however, another story, and not completely fiction. The very first kings of Egypt were buried in an area of the sprawling Abydos necropolis called Umm el-Qa'ab. One of the first kings, Djer of Dynasty 1, had his tomb built near the center of this area; you can see it at center in this illustration. The cult of the god Osiris did not exist in Djer's time, nor would it till late in the Old Kingdom, but by Dynasty 12 of the Middle Kingdom it was thriving throughout the Nile Valley. Now, Dynasty 12 was over a thousand years after the time of Djer. For reasons still not clear to us, the Egyptians of this later time identified Djer's tomb as the tomb of Osiris, and Abydos became the main cult center for this god. In Egyptian mythology Osiris was originally a mortal man who became a god only after death, and the rituals to honor and celebrate him at Abydos grew in popularity and elaborateness through the rest of pharaonic history.

I should note that Amélineau was not really an Egyptologist. He was merely an antiquarian and enthusiast, as were most people digging all over Egypt in his time. And in fact, Amélineau and his team did a rather horrible job digging at Abydos, a fact recognized by the very disconcerted Flinders Petrie, who followed Amélineau at Abydos and spent a great deal of time trying to undo the damage Amélineau and his team had inflicted there. I suppose how poorly Amélineau conducted his excavations at Abydos is beside the point, but we can safely say that, no, neither he nor anyone else found Osiris' head in a jar. Maybe his hoagie, but not his head.

Quote

Edit : Searching further i found out Wayne Chandlers Book at Google books. Seems to be a Afro centrist theory book

Of Gods and Men: Egypt’s Old Kingdom- Wayne Chandler

This led me to search for books by Amelineau and got two books, but they are in french. Does any one know enough french to read through them??
the link is below

books by Emile Amelineau


and one funny thing i noticed while reading these Afro centrist websites is the similarity
between Ancient Egyptian Spoken and the Wolof Language of africa.

check that out too.

Psst. i am still a skeptic.. :P

I'm glad you are still a skeptic. It's a healthy attitude to foster. My French is so poor that I wouldn't attempt to read Amélineau's books in that language, but I'm quite certain they've been translated into English. Neither language would do you much good, however. Amélineau was not a polished excavator, nor should you place much interest in his written material. Modern literature is a far sight better in all regards, particularly David O'Connor's recent book on Abydos. It's wonderful. :tu:

I think you know as well as I not to trust afrocentric material. It has an agenda that encourages the twisting of facts, as well as shoddy or non-existent research. When someone approaches historical study for the purpose of achieving some socio-political goal, that person's contributions to the field are suspect from the get-go. Do not trust. Like many fringe writers, afrocentrists know to sprinkle in just enough solid facts along with their mountains of poorly constructed arguments to make a written piece sound plausible. This doesn't make it plausible. If you for any reason feel doubtful about the intellectual integrity of any written source, be it in a book or on the internet, you know it's best not to trust the source at all.

I do not mean to single out afrocentrists. Eurocentrists are every bit as bad, if not worse. Much of the time the material of the latter is plainly racist in nature. It pisses me off. Eurocentric arguments are just as silly and shoddy and just as pointless to consider. I mean, it can get pretty absurd as well as laughable. I've come across one eurocentric website that tries to convince the reader that the well-known prehistoric mummy known as Ginger, in the British Museum, is of Nordic origin just because the skull still evidences traces of reddish-hued hair. This sort of rubbish is not to be taken seriously by educated people.

Psst. I am definitely still a skeptic!

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#35    ftballplaya99

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:01 PM

“We find when we discover Egypt in what we call the First Dynasty, under Menes, that it is at its absolute zenith of culture in painting, sculpture, architecture. From this peak period, the Egyptian culture steadily declines. It is very much as if the Egyptians found themeselves the inheritors of a great ready-made culture of which they could take advantafe, which they could utilize and even to some degree emulate, but which they themselves did not create . . . . This very strongly suggests that it drew its greatness from a source higher than itself . . . .”


http://www.rastafari...g.pl?read=55043



Edited by Still Waters, 13 February 2013 - 10:51 PM.
Reduced amount of copied text & added source link


#36    Qwaiser

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 12:22 PM

There might be some truth in some of their theories
As for the Anu, all I found out was that they were an early group of people and were associated why Narmer aand some Ivory king of Abydos.


#37    Elle Aunu

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 07:35 PM

Wow being that I just married into the Aunu clan of Pollap, Chuuk Micronesia.... I find this all very interesting.


#38    kmt_sesh

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 04:15 AM

Elle's post reminded me that I never came back to this old discussion. I read back through the old posts and noticed my own confusion about the identity of the "Aunu" people, and the same confusion shared by other posters.

Although I forgot about this thread, I ended up doing more research on the ancient plaque and learned enough to write an article on it for my blog (page here, if interested). There's no reason for me to copy and paste the entire article here, but a succinct review might be worthwhile for anyone else who might stumble across this thread. First off, I see in one of my old posts (#24) that I was unsuccessful in tracking down the present location of the ancient plaque. Imagine my amusement, then, when realizing it is part of the collection of the Oriental Institute (OIM E7911), one of the museums here in Chicago where I work as a docent. I'm not certain if the plaque is on permanent display but it was part of a special exhibit a couple of years ago. The O.I. has over 20,000 artifacts in its Egyptian collection, and only a small percentage of them are on public display; I wouldn't be surprised if the plaque is one of the artifacts in storage.

But let's start with a color-coded aid I had set up for my blog article:

Posted Image

I've set the hieroglyphs off to the right, for easier reading. Now, bear in mind its first publisher, Flinders Petrie, had little talent for translating hieroglyphs. He was a brilliant archaeologist and that was his strength. That said, Petire's attempted translation of the plaque is mostly garbled.

There was no such thing in Egypt as the "Aunu People."

Properly rendered the figure's name (shaded red) is not "Tera-neter" but Terinetjer, which translates as "One who worships the gods." The blue-shaded area says Menhet, which was the name of a town—probably located in the area of the estate I'll mention next. The green-shaded portion at the top is still disputed and not clearly understood, but the overall consensus is that it's the name of an estate: Nekhenu. Terinetjer may have overseen production activities at this estate.

In other words, the term "Aunu" does not even appear on this plaque. Petrie's attempt to make sense of it falls considerably short, but that's why it's important to consult modern research.

There, I feel better now.

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