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Tutankhamun excavation archive goes online


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#1    The_Spartan

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:09 AM

www.oxfordmail.co.uk said:

THE huge archive of material relating to the discovery of King Tutankhamun has been put online for the first time.

The comprehensive notes and photos recording the find by archaeologist Howard Carter in 1922, were donated to Oxford University’s first Professor of Egyptology, Frank Griffith, by the Carter family.

In turn, this archive became the Griffith Institute, attached to Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum, and it is the institute’s Keeper of the Archives Dr Jaromir Malek, 66, along with his assistant Elizabeth Fleming, who have diligently been loading the mass of information on to the Internet in their spare time.

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The Griffith Institute has been uploading data from Howard Carter's Notes & Journals including Photographs from his excavation that discovered King Tut's stuff.

Griffith Institute

The website for Griffith Institute itself is a treasure trove on all stuff ancient egyptian.

The links for the King Tut stuff is at
The Search For King Tutankhamun or Howard Carter's records of the five seasons of excavations,financed by Lord Carnarvon,in the Valley of the Kings 1915 - 1922

Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation

Great Collection.

Everyone with an interest in King Tut and Ancient Egypt and archaeology should give it a read. Recommended.

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#2    susieice

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 06:57 AM

I was fortunate enough to see the King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and it was one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. I will always remember it.

"The universe is full of magical things, patiently waiting for our wits to sharpen."  Eden Phillpotts

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#3    Sarge Fury

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 03:05 PM

I wouldn't take a risk if I were you. The curse could still be able to reach us, even through the world wide web.

I am the Alpha and the Omega, the one who is and who was and who is to come, the almighty. (Rev 1:8)

#4    TheSearcher

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 04:04 PM

View PostSarge Fury, on 14 August 2010 - 03:05 PM, said:

I wouldn't take a risk if I were you. The curse could still be able to reach us, even through the world wide web.

I do hope you're joking? I for one will look into it, cause I see the opportunity for learning.

It is only the ignorant who despise education.
Publilius Syrus.

So god made me an atheist. Who are you to question his wisdom?!

#5    Sarge Fury

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 04:10 PM

View PostTheSearcher, on 14 August 2010 - 04:04 PM, said:

I do hope you're joking? I for one will look into it, cause I see the opportunity for learning.
I'm not joking. The curse of Tutankhamen is very well known. It's a killer. I wouldn't take the risk if I were you. I'm still young, and I still have plenty more to live for. It's not worth it.

I am the Alpha and the Omega, the one who is and who was and who is to come, the almighty. (Rev 1:8)

#6    Pierce8

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 04:50 PM

Quote

I'm not joking. The curse of Tutankhamen is very well known. It's a killer. I wouldn't take the risk if I were you. I'm still young, and I still have plenty more to live for. It's not worth it.  

There's no curse... its the belief that kills..


#7    ShadowSot

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 05:06 PM

There's no curse period.
It's the belief in the curse which looked into the random deaths of the men and assembled a pattern.
Carter died in 1939, at the age of 64, 17 years after opening the tomb.

Edited by ShadowSot, 14 August 2010 - 05:10 PM.

It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone's fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I'm one of Us. I must be. I've certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We're always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
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#8    kmt_sesh

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 11:38 PM

Nice job, Mr. Spartan.

I've been using the website of the Griffith Institute for years, particularly to access the Tut archive. It has a full array of Harry Burton's photographs, which alone makes a visit to the site worth your while.

I have to ask, however, why post a link to a scholarly and useful website? It will not help the fringe fans among us find speculative, nonsensical information! :lol:

Sorry, couldn't help it. But on that note, I know I generally poo-poo the internet as a means for research, but the Griffith Institute's web pages are on of those very rare and notable exceptions.

Just beware of the curse. It will travel through the ether of the Net and invade your computer, allowing you to see nothing on your browser but very nasty biker porn. Okay, that's not true. In point of fact, not one inscription among the artifacts in KV62, the tomb of Tutankhamun, bears a written curse. Nor does the tomb itself, for that matter. Very few tombs actually had curses on or in them--Hollywood has blown this way out of proportion.

For some reason people to this day still attribute some kind of curse to the tomb of Tut. They point to people involved in the excavation in the 1920s who died during the clearing of the tomb or afterward. But there were a hell of a lot of men involved in the excavation, and as ShadowSot mentioned, the few deaths were random. It's a given that some of the people involved would possibly die during or soon after the excavation.

There is no curse. Except for the biker porn. Beware the biker porn.

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#9    Black Hound

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 11:48 PM

Having viewed it at the Egyptian Museum and the tomb, I still might look at it when it goes on line.BTW, yes I have been to Egypt.

Edited by Graveyard Hound, 14 August 2010 - 11:49 PM.


#10    Piney

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 12:12 AM

View Postsusieice, on 14 August 2010 - 06:57 AM, said:

I was fortunate enough to see the King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and it was one of the most beautiful things I've ever seen. I will always remember it.

I did too! I really don't have any interest in Egyptology but I'm a artist and I went to see the beautiful, skilled workmanship of the Egyptians. :tu:




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#11    archernyc

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 12:35 AM

I'm going to see it next week in Times Square!  Piney and Susieice, was there a book about the exhibit available for purchase?

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#12    kmt_sesh

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 02:28 AM

View Postarchernyc, on 15 August 2010 - 12:35 AM, said:

I'm going to see it next week in Times Square!  Piney and Susieice, was there a book about the exhibit available for purchase?

I worked the exhibit during its eight-month run at the Field Museum in Chicago. For an Egyptophile like me it was a grand experience. I had admired and studied many of the artifacts through photography and literature, so it was a real treat finally to see the actual objects up close and personal.

The official exhibit website is here. If you're interested in the exhibit companion book, click here. You can always wait till you attend the exhibit, but if my advice is worth anything I honestly recommend buying and reading it beforehand. You'll be better prepared for the exhibit, you'll understand the history and background better, and I think you'll have an even better appreciation for the artifacts. This book was written by none other than Zahi Hawass. No surprise there. As goofy as he tends to be, and as inane as a lot of the stuff he tends to say in press interviews is, Hawass is a solid researcher and a good writer. As far as companion books go--trust me, I've seen some that are best suited to line the bottoms of bird cages--the companion book for the Tut exhibit is pretty damn decent. I really enjoyed it, myself.

By the time the exhibit was about done at the Field, I and other docents were ready to see it move on. Don't get me wrong, it was a fabulous experience, but the Field was an absolute madhouse during the eight-month run and we were worn out. To tell you the truth, however, I miss it now. Of course I do. I would love to see it again, if just one last time.

I wish I could be there with you, archernyc. There's so much to see and drink in. Don't expect to see Tut's mummy itself because it still lies in the tomb (KV62, in the Valley of the Kings) and has never travelled. Likely it never will. It's in awful shape and wouldn't survive extensive travel. Also, don't exhibit to see the iconic burial mask of King Tut. It traveled in the large exhibit in the late 1970s but hasn't since. I can appreciate why. It's of extreme importance to the heritage of Egypt.

There's plenty of wonderful stuff to see, however. If you leave the exhibit bored or dissatisfied, you've definitely done something wrong! Some of my own favorite things, and artifacts I recommend hunting down in particular, include (in no particular order):

Golden canopic coffinette

Throne of Queen Sitamun

Inlaid chest of Amunhotep III and Tiye

Any and all furniture found in Tut's tomb

Tut's golden dagger

The gilded coffin of Tjuya

There is a hell of a lot more than this, of course. Everyone probably determines his or her own very favorite object on display. For me it was hard to nail down but I'd have to say it was a particularly beautiful golden shrine found in Tut's tomb.

One thing that has us Field Museum folks extremely envious about the New York venue, is that it has installed one of the chariots found in Tut's tomb. Grrrrr! I am so jealous! I don't know if the chariot will be going on to the following venues but make sure you get a good, long look at it, and think of poor ol' kmt_sesh as you're enjoying it.

As a museum docent, allow me to offer one word of advice about touring the exhibit. Once you get to the end and can see the exit doors, don't just walk out unless you feel you're well and truly finished. I can't guarantee it's the same in New York as it was at the Field, but in our case, you could backtrack all the way back to the beginning and start over. And you could keep doing it, over and over. A savvy friend of mine did this at the Field and she spent the better part of an entire day in there.

Sorry to drone on so much, archernyc. LOL I'm living vicariously through you. I hope you have a wonderful experience, and once it's over, I sure wouldn't mind hearing your impressions of the exhibit. Enjoy! Posted Image

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#13    susieice

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 02:56 AM

kmt_sesh-  Philadelphia had the chariot also and I remember boats. Not just the small ones but rather large ones too. Where they in Chicago. There was so much to see. I loved the alabaster lion lying over the figurines that signified Tut's rule over Nubia according to my audio tour. Looking at the pictures in the second link in the OP and seeing photos of where they found it, I can't believe it. On the floor under all kinds of other stuff. LOL.
http://www.griffith....ry/gal-033.html

The canopic chest was very beautiful. We did an IMAX of ancient Egypt and the Valley of the Kings also. I bet it was an experience to work for the exhibit.

archernyc- Yes you can get a nice souvenier book that has pictures of the articles on display. Pictures are not allowed to be taken in the exhibit. Also, go into the gift shop when your finished with your tour. I picked up a couple of beautiful incense burners and oil diffusers of Anubis and Isis. They are reasonably priced and a great way to remember your trip. I got refrigerator magnets for all the people at work except our maintenance man wanted a mummy so I got him a pen. Enjoy your trip. It's the chance of a lifetime. If I can get to New York to see it again before it leaves the end of December I'm so there. A friend of mine is looking into it now, but we usually go by bus tour as she doesn't like to drive in NYC. It takes longer to get to Times Square from the tunnels than it does to get from where I live to the tunnels. LOL.

Edited by susieice, 15 August 2010 - 03:18 AM.

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#14    kmt_sesh

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 05:08 AM

View Postsusieice, on 15 August 2010 - 02:56 AM, said:

kmt_sesh-  Philadelphia had the chariot also and I remember boats. Not just the small ones but rather large ones too. Where they in Chicago.

Are you sure about the chariot? The New York venue is touted as the first ever to have the chariot in the run of this exhibit, and the SCA reports that this is the first time one of Tut's six chariots has left Egypt. There are a lot of news reports like this one.

I'm sure you saw the same boats as we had in the Field Museum. Tut's tomb contained over 30 model boats and two or more were on display. The largest model boat on display was, however, one from KV35, the tomb of Amunhotep II (bow seen here). Kings by this time were no longer buried with real boats, and authentic pharaonic boats are extremely rare to see outside of modern Egypt. There are only two in all of the Western Hemisphere, one at the Field Museum and the other in your own neck of the woods, at the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh. They both come from the same funeral complex of Senusret III, Dynasty 12, at Dashur.

Quote

There was so much to see. I loved the alabaster lion lying over the figurines that signified Tut's rule over Nubia according to my audio tour.


I think you're talking about this one. You have good taste. LOL I like the little tongue lolling out of its mouth, as though it were hot and panting after the kill. The exhibit has a lot stunning vessels and those of calcite, like the one with the lion, are arguably the most spectacular. This is one I fondly remember.

Quote

The canopic chest was very beautiful. We did an IMAX of ancient Egypt and the Valley of the Kings also. I bet it was an experience to work for the exhibit.

Is this one of the chests? If I remember correctly there were two of them, one belonging to Yuya and the other to Tjuya (the great-grandparents of Tut). Some of my favorite artifacts were in that Yuya and Tjuya gallery, including Tjuya's gilded-wood coffin, her burial mask, the throne of Sitamun, and some particularly beautiful shabti figurines.

We don't have an IMAX at the Field so we missed out on that--I can only imagine what a treat that must have been. Yes, it was quite an experience working in the exhibit. I gave a number of private tours that I still fondly remember, including one for a very nice older man who was blind, and his family. I also remember a private tour for a group of deaf people for whom the museum had to hire a sign-language interpreter, and the interpreter I don't fondly remember. She was a real...well, let's just say it rhymes with "witch." To be fair, though, she works with her hands, and given the dim lighting and extremely crowded rooms, it wasn't easy for the poor lady. :lol:

Quote

archernyc- Yes you can get a nice souvenier book that has pictures of the articles on display. Pictures are not allowed to be taken in the exhibit. Also, go into the gift shop when your finished with your tour. I picked up a couple of beautiful incense burners and oil diffusers of Anubis and Isis. They are reasonably priced and a great way to remember your trip. I got refrigerator magnets for all the people at work except our maintenance man wanted a mummy so I got him a pen. Enjoy your trip. It's the chance of a lifetime. If I can get to New York to see it again before it leaves the end of December I'm so there. A friend of mine is looking into it now, but we usually go by bus tour as she doesn't like to drive in NYC. It takes longer to get to Times Square from the tunnels than it does to get from where I live to the tunnels. LOL.

LOL I had to chuckle when you mentioned refrigerator magnets. I loved those things and bought one of each kind. They're still on my fridge, all in a neat row!

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#15    susieice

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 02:19 PM

kmt_sesh- I wish you would have been there with us to give us the tour!! In Philly we didn't have any human tour guides we could ask questions, just an audio tour with numbers you matched to the exhibits and a recording told you what you were looking at. There were at least 2 guards in every room to make sure you didn't take pictures or get to touchy with anything. Many of the artifacts weren't on the recording. I think I missed alot of information about what I saw. Archernyc really should get the book before hand before she goes to see the exhibit. Good advise.

I am about 50% sure I saw a chariot there. I do remember some of the boats were raised off the floor and had to be 7-8 feet long. I remember thinking they would be too small to travel the Nile, but rather large for models. They were plain, kind of like a canoe but made of what looked like reeds.

The chest I remember because of the heiroglypics on it. It was gold and had engravings of Tut and his wife on the side with a story that told about how happy their life was together. I had seen those heiroglypics in a hundred books and remembered the translation. Maybe it wasn't even a canopic chest though that's what I remember the recording saying. It was amazing to see it in person.

That's the lion. I have his magnet on my fridge LOL- along with the exhibition's magnet. That little guy is so beautiful and the artwork is spectacular. I was disappointed because the funeral mask of Tut wasn't making this tour but he made up for that.

Now I really want to get to NYC to see it again!! Hope Archernyc keeps us posted on her experience.

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