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Göbekli Tepe-10 000 BC


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#151    The Puzzler

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 04:31 AM

Evidence is of sky burial at Gobekli Tepe.

I mentioned it as a comparison to Paris even, being exposed on a mountain as a baby. Both in Anatolia/Turkey. Exposure and sky burial are very ancient.

Ground burials, sky burials or fire burials seem to be a constant in cultures.

In an mmm bop it's gone...

#152    Melamet

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:17 AM

:rolleyes:
   Ermmm, why does anyone on earth think the 'snake carvings' are snakes? Do they think these people were so primitive that they were incapable of carving a realistic looking snake? Isn't it obvious that the 'snakes' are in fact psilocybin mushrooms to anyone who ever was closely aquainted with them? Simply by Occam's razor...apart from the revisionist projections of 'scientific' archeologists, and anti 'drug' propaganda purposes of the Turkish Government, what do they actually look like?

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#153    Melamet

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 09:43 AM

Attached File  Some of the circles at Gobekli Tepe located by Ground Penetrating Radar.jpg   53.71K   6 downloads
   I guess everyone knows that Schmidt has located @ 20 circles by Ground Penetrating Radar...

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#154    questionmark

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 10:33 AM

View PostThe Puzzler, on 03 May 2011 - 04:31 AM, said:

Evidence is of sky burial at Gobekli Tepe.

I mentioned it as a comparison to Paris even, being exposed on a mountain as a baby. Both in Anatolia/Turkey. Exposure and sky burial are very ancient.

Ground burials, sky burials or fire burials seem to be a constant in cultures.

Not quite, in the Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures fire and sky are an absolute no no. If it is happening again where any of these religions are dominant it is due to the culture shifting from religious to laicistic.

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#155    The_Spartan

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 11:20 AM

its mainly the Zoroastrians/parsees and the Tibetan Buddhists who practice sky burials.

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#156    questionmark

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 11:57 AM

View PostThe Traveller, on 19 May 2011 - 11:46 AM, said:

I find this very interesting. Artifacts from the end of the stone age display considerably more sophistication than those from the start of the bronze age, and likewise those at the end of the bronze age have more sophistication than those from the start of the iron age. What this usually indicates is an advanced but somewhat stagnant culture being displaced by a less culturally capable but more warlike group with superior weapons, resetting the clock as it were. This mechanism might also apply to natural disasters which reduce whole civilisations to a more primitive state.

The advancement of a culture is not shown by the dedication of its craftsmen to create something but by the materials and methods used. In fact, none of our buildings will last as long as the Roman Pantheon or any of the Gothic cathedrals. That does not mean that the Romans or the people in the middle ages were more advanced.

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#157    lightly

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 12:47 AM

...  i really wonder about the whole concept of advancement sometimes.. when i look at modern society.    :wacko:

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#158    third_eye

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 03:00 PM

View Postlightly, on 20 May 2011 - 12:47 AM, said:

...  i really wonder about the whole concept of advancement sometimes.. when i look at modern society.    :wacko:

I know what you mean ... I prefer to use "definition" of "advanced society" rather than "concept of"

The Turpan Valley Site (China) and the YangHai Tombs Relics shows plenty early Central Euro influences however where one would define as "advanced" was brought in or evidently local gets blurred after a thousand years of inter mingling.
Time and information gets around much much slower in those old days.

The "Deer Stones" "Deer Carvings Totems" looks very interesting.

If interested Google "YangHai Tombs" with "JOurneys in Time" and CCTV.Com I think the 10 part Docu is available for online viewing

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#159    questionmark

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Posted 20 May 2011 - 03:29 PM

View PostThe Traveller, on 20 May 2011 - 03:24 PM, said:

I'd differentiate between technological advancement and cultural advancement though. Who knows how many Shakespeares were lost when those civilisations collapsed?

Who knows how many we lost because they were wasting their time on mental maxtubation?

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#160    Damrod

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 12:33 AM

New National geographic article out on this...great read.  Hope you like it...it's the June release btw...Hot off the presses!

http://ngm.nationalg...epe/mann-text/1


#161    lightly

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:13 AM

I liked it, great picture too.. The hands over a whatchamacallit ..once again!!  and I especially like this statement :
Bewilderingly, the people at Göbekli Tepe got steadily worse at temple building. The earliest rings are the biggest and most sophisticated, technically and artistically.

I guess that might happen as the belief system responsible waned.. or changed,  but still, that's interesting.

Edited by lightly, 02 June 2011 - 12:14 AM.

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#162    questionmark

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 12:18 AM

View Postlightly, on 02 June 2011 - 12:13 AM, said:

I liked it, great picture too.. The hands over a whatchamacallit ..once again!!  and I especially like this statement :
Bewilderingly, the people at Göbekli Tepe got steadily worse at temple building. The earliest rings are the biggest and most sophisticated, technically and artistically.

I guess that might happen as the belief system responsible waned.. or changed,  but still, that's interesting.

The problem the people of Gobeliki faced is that the paradigm they were living changed drastically. When they started they were hunter gatherers, when they ended they were farmers. The myths of the hunter gatherers waned and were substituted by myths created by new needs. The people who were left in Gobeliki were those incapable of changing their views of the world, which means that the less intelligent and mentally mobile were left to tend to the temples and their maintenance. The result is known.

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#163    lightly

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 11:34 AM

View Postquestionmark, on 02 June 2011 - 12:18 AM, said:

The problem the people of Gobeliki faced is that the paradigm they were living changed drastically. When they started they were hunter gatherers, when they ended they were farmers. The myths of the hunter gatherers waned and were substituted by myths created by new needs. The people who were left in Gobeliki were those incapable of changing their views of the world, which means that the less intelligent and mentally mobile were left to tend to the temples and their maintenance. The result is known.

This article from 2008 basically agrees with you  ...
http://www.smithsoni...bekli-tepe.html

   Only a very small percentage has been excavated..  still no sign of dwellings or a cooking hearth... which pretty much rules out the site being occupied, rather just visited ceremoniously.
Evidence of the world's oldest variety of domesticated wheat found nearby only postdates the sight by about 500 years.  
Some human bones have been found among the rubble..  possibly buried there by hangers on before the site was completely forgotten.. or just later unconnected burials ?  
   According to the article, the temples rest on limestone floors? (pretty fancy)  .. is it known yet  what is under those floors?

Important:  The above may contain errors, inaccuracies, omissions, and other limitations.

#164    questionmark

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 01:10 PM

View Postlightly, on 03 June 2011 - 11:34 AM, said:

This article from 2008 basically agrees with you  ...
http://www.smithsoni...bekli-tepe.html

   Only a very small percentage has been excavated..  still no sign of dwellings or a cooking hearth... which pretty much rules out the site being occupied, rather just visited ceremoniously.
Evidence of the world's oldest variety of domesticated wheat found nearby only postdates the sight by about 500 years.  
Some human bones have been found among the rubble..  possibly buried there by hangers on before the site was completely forgotten.. or just later unconnected burials ?  
   According to the article, the temples rest on limestone floors? (pretty fancy)  .. is it known yet  what is under those floors?

At this point there is much speculation about that. Except excavation not much has been done at this point. But the indication seems to be that the place was not inhabited, which would stay in the tradition of certain cult caves (Mostly southern Europe)of the time or preceding Gobeliki. That is why we assume that it comes from the same hunter gatherer cultures that preceded agriculture.  Now, everybody could be dead wrong.

Not until the gross excavation is done can the theoretical work begin, and at that point we will know how things fit together.

Edited by questionmark, 03 June 2011 - 01:10 PM.

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#165    know_doubt

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 12:57 PM

Interesting how little we know about our own past





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