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The new Chupacabra? Mystery animal confounds


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65 replies to this topic

#31    diablo_04

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 06:45 PM

look like a sick little deer :hmm:

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#32    marharthm

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 08:04 PM

View PostShadowSot, on 21 August 2011 - 02:08 PM, said:

You seem to have missed both pictures of the bald foxes in this thread.
So when foxes lose their hair they grow longer tails and have their snout elongated?

If this was really a Chupacabra I don't think it would of been very nice. This is probably another animal. People shouldn't jump to the conclusion that it is a hairless fox just based on a few pictures.

It looks a lot like a hairless fox, but the hospital wasn't sure and it was made a pretty large news story. Just because it looks similar to a hairless  fox does not mean it is a hairless fox.


#33    dharma warrior

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 08:41 PM

kill it


#34    SpiritTraveler

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 08:44 PM

It does look canine but has some features not seen in them. It's tail is way too long and has a tuft on the end. The back is rounded into a large rump. The back legs are much longer than the front. And it doesn't have mange. What causes mange is inflamed skin with rashes and sores, then the hair falls out. This looks like many of the other  Chupacabra photos I've see. It's not a monster but it's not like any other animal I've seen either. The name Chupacabra is just a name. We name everything. Doesn't mean it's a monster.


#35    DieChecker

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 08:58 PM

View Postmarharthm, on 21 August 2011 - 08:04 PM, said:

So when foxes lose their hair they grow longer tails and have their snout elongated?

If this was really a Chupacabra I don't think it would of been very nice. This is probably another animal. People shouldn't jump to the conclusion that it is a hairless fox just based on a few pictures.

It looks a lot like a hairless fox, but the hospital wasn't sure and it was made a pretty large news story. Just because it looks similar to a hairless  fox does not mean it is a hairless fox.
Foxes and Coyotes and dogs for that matter, look slimmer, with longer claws, legs, snouts, ears and tails, when they loose their hair. Hair makes them look like 25% larger/fuller. I don't think a 10-20% longer tail is something that is outside the normal range of what can be expected inside a species.

Look at this fox, it's tail drags on the ground. The tail, if it was stretched over the fox's back would tap him right between the shoulder blades, which is comparable to what the critter in the video had.
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#36    Kid Icarus

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 10:57 PM

whatever it is, it looks sickly


#37    Taut

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 12:17 AM

And how, just for the record, would anyone know what a Chupacabra would or would not do?


And how would an xray tech know anything about cryptids - no offense to the xray techs.


Looks like a sickly coyote hybrid, saw something similar on the Yellowstone border once.   But what do I know - zip.

Edited by Taut, 22 August 2011 - 12:29 AM.


#38    theGhost_and_theDarkness

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 12:34 AM

View PostLittlehawk, on 21 August 2011 - 03:39 PM, said:

As a dog groomer, I have worked at veterinary offices on and off for the past 13 years. I grew up around animals/farms/etc... I have seen mange. If you haven't seen mange, all it takes is a google search for "fox with mange" to determine for yourselves that mangy skin is almost always puffy, red, inflamed, and not smooth like this animal.  I do admit, it looks exactly like a hairless fox. I'm going to guess it's just a hairless fox, much like the recessive gene for the hairless pups like the Chinese Crested. Fascinating all the same.


Yes, apparently everybody missed my post. There is a genetic condition among foxes that make some of them hairless. The first picture posted in this thread was not a fox with mange (as the poster guessed) it was a hairless fox. Part of a small population within the area where the picture was taken. That picture actually has a story and a study behind it. No idea why it comes up under fox with mange searches.

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So when foxes lose their hair they grow longer tails and have their snout elongated?

The tail of a fox is actually rather long, but their hair makes them look stumpier because of the fullness. The hair framing the face does the same thing, it makes their face look fuller and shorter. When the hair is removed, the features seem odd because they are actually just much longer than they look

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#39    Flashbelieve

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 05:45 AM

I would like to know how many people on this and other threads has actually seen a fox in the wild. Not pictures. You caint really tell how tall any animal is in a picture. We have foxes in Florida. I always have been in woods for different things, hunting fishing camping exploring swimming and living. I have only seen 2 fox in woods in all my life. They are considered small animals. The ones i saw were also small. Nowhere near the size of a large animal like a shepard or coyote. I lived in Arizona, not in a town, but in woods and desert for a few years recently. I have also lived in Arkansas in woods, mountains. I saw a wolf in Ark. Told local people about it, they said there was no wolves there. I saw one in Az. Locals said no, not any. Found out Game and Fish Com. in several states have been importing wolves from Mexico for years. No, they didnt tell anyone, they didnt want public to know and start hunting and killing them again. Yhey are still listed as extinct in most states. The one in Arkansas was over 6 ft. long, longer back legs, shorter front legs, tall pointed ears, longer nose than a large German Shepard. Also light brown hair medium length.


#40    Flashbelieve

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 06:27 AM

The game and fish commision has been putting wolves in most states west of the Mississippi River that has enough woods to support them. They try to keep an eye on them and there progress. If your wandering why people killed them, it was because when they got hungry they would kill cows and eat some and leave the rest to waste or other animals and buzzards. A cow in a pen or behind a fence was much easer to catch and kill than a wild animal. So people hunted and killed them off. Anyway the way i see it is most fox could walk under most coyotes with out touching each other, and certainly under a shepard or wolf. I have said this before. When an animal gets the MANGE,  it only loses hair where the sores are. Not all over there body. The sores also gets bloody, puss runs out, and they scratch because it itches they get worse. BUT THE HAIR ONLY FALLS OUT ON THE SORE,NOT THE ENTIRE BODY. There skin remains pink even after the sores are healed and the hair grows back. The skin never turns dark gray, and the animal never loses all there hair. If not treated it will get in bloodstream and kill the animal before it spreads even over 1/10 of the animal. I am so tired of reading MANGY ANIMALS.


#41    Nufc1966

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 10:48 AM

I agree with #32


#42    Nufc1966

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 10:49 AM

View Postdharma warrior, on 21 August 2011 - 08:41 PM, said:

kill it

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#43    Coffey

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 04:00 PM

View Postmarharthm, on 21 August 2011 - 08:04 PM, said:

So when foxes lose their hair they grow longer tails and have their snout elongated?

If this was really a Chupacabra I don't think it would of been very nice. This is probably another animal. People shouldn't jump to the conclusion that it is a hairless fox just based on a few pictures.

It looks a lot like a hairless fox, but the hospital wasn't sure and it was made a pretty large news story. Just because it looks similar to a hairless  fox does not mean it is a hairless fox.


It looks identical to a fox without hair.... what else could it be? LOL

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#44    shadowsot

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 04:22 PM

View PostCoffey, on 22 August 2011 - 04:00 PM, said:

It looks identical to a fox without hair.... what else could it be? LOL
A Hyrax.

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#45    Oppono Astos

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 04:23 PM

View PostShadowSot, on 22 August 2011 - 04:22 PM, said:

A Hyrax.
Indeed, a classic medium hyrax - too small to be a giant one  :rolleyes:

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