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A Well Supported Theory about Pyramids


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#16    lilthor

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 04:37 PM

Quote

It would make sense if pyramids could collect water but they can't.

Good video.  This is along the lines of what I've always felt GP1 was initially intended for: water resource management.

Keep in mind that the surface area of GP's 4 sides is vastly immense and reaches up into the air off the floor of the plateau.  Also, due to the thermal mass of the structure, as well as its white tura cladding, it's surface temperature would remain fairly constant through day and night.  This would allow the pyramid to literally pull moisture from the atmosphere via condensation every day, regardless of season, and in potentially significant amounts.

So you have rain, condensation, and ground water all being directed by the pyramid into the relatively small volume enclosure that surrounds its base.  Pretty smart folks.


#17    lilthor

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 05:11 PM

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.


I bet somebody got laid for this idea.


#18    cladking

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 05:14 PM

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 04:37 PM, said:

Good video.  This is along the lines of what I've always felt GP1 was initially intended for: water resource management.

Keep in mind that the surface area of GP's 4 sides is vastly immense and reaches up into the air off the floor of the plateau.  Also, due to the thermal mass of the structure, as well as its white tura cladding, it's surface temperature would remain fairly constant through day and night.  This would allow the pyramid to literally pull moisture from the atmosphere via condensation every day, regardless of season, and in potentially significant amounts.

So you have rain, condensation, and ground water all being directed by the pyramid into the relatively small volume enclosure that surrounds its base.  Pretty smart folks.


Thank you.  Very good points.

The idea of condensation has occured to me before but I was forced to
reject it because of the low humidity conditions of the desert.  Perhaps
I dismissed it too quickly since humidity goes up in the middle of the
summer when the wind switches to the north.  

There are conditions under which significant amounts of condensation
would have occured but I believe as a source of water alone these condi-
tions were far too infrequent to warrant construction.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#19    cladking

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 05:19 PM

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 05:11 PM, said:

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.


I bet somebody got laid for this idea.


I've always said the white and red pyramids were to denote hot and cold running water.  ;)

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#20    lilthor

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 05:22 PM

View Postcladking, on 04 November 2011 - 05:14 PM, said:

There are conditions under which significant amounts of condensation
would have occured but I believe as a source of water alone these condi-
tions were far too infrequent to warrant construction.

Agreed...which is why I said this:

Quote

So you have rain, condensation, and ground water all being directed by the pyramid into the relatively small volume enclosure that surrounds its base

Sorry you missed it.


#21    cladking

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 05:29 PM

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 05:11 PM, said:

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.


I bet somebody got laid for this idea.


I see some problems with this.  I doubt that you could get so much water on a regular basis.
Over the summer the pyramid will warm up near the surface and condensation will decrease.  You
might actually get so much initially but when the wind is wrong and as the season wears on
the amount decreases.  

A bigger problem is that this catchment device is designed to handle far larger amounts of
water than a mere 6000 gallons.  If intended for a small amount of water it would be much
narrower around the pyramid (G2's water catchment is several times the size of the pyramid)
and it would be very carefully sloped so all the water ran to a specific location.  While
the G1 catchment does funnel the water to the so called mortuary temple it is not carefully
sloped.  There are low and high spots so much of the water would sit in low spots where it
would be difficult to collect and would tend to evaporate away.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#22    cladking

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 05:36 PM

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 05:22 PM, said:

Sorry you missed it.


I'm certainly in agreement that they had sources of water on the plateau which
orthodoxy refuses to even consider.  I'm certainly in agreement that condensation
would be one of these sources.  I merely can't agree that condensation could be
sufficient reason to build  a great pyramid.


Edited to add that they might have built and designed the pyramid the way they did
to maximize condensation but not that it was a machine to generate condensate.

Edited by cladking, 04 November 2011 - 05:40 PM.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#23    hortie

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 07:43 PM

View PostAus Der Box Skeptisch, on 04 November 2011 - 03:58 AM, said:

Where's the ramp?
Hahahahahaha nice one


#24    Harte

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 07:48 PM

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 05:11 PM, said:

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.

I bet somebody got laid for this idea.
6000 gallons is considerably less than one-one hundredth of the amount of water rolling by in a single second in the Nile, at the time only a few hundred meters away.

Bet nobody got laid for an idea that didn't exist.  If it did, it was a solution to a problem that didn't exist.

Harte

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#25    hortie

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 07:48 PM

View PostEnglishgent, on 04 November 2011 - 02:05 AM, said:

Interesting thoery but seems an awful lot of trouble to go to just to collect water, which was generally in plentiful supply in that area due to the annual flooding of the NIle.  Also, if this was the reason for the pyramids being built, why the complex interior? In my humble opinion it just doesnt hold water (scuse the pun) :)
This was my initial reaction when I seen this as well.  However what if the water collection aspect was made after the pyramids were completed and someone thought hmmmm, we can collect this water.


#26    lilthor

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 08:06 PM

View PostHarte, on 04 November 2011 - 07:48 PM, said:

6000 gallons is considerably less than one-one hundredth of the amount of water rolling by in a single second in the Nile, at the time only a few hundred meters away.

Harte

Ah yes the Nile...oh so close, yet so far from clean and safe to drink.  On the other hand, a static system capable of purifying 6,000 gallons per day while topping off cisterns of potable water would be valuable indeed.

Quote

Bet nobody got laid for an idea that didn't exist.

You should get out more...it's easier than you think!  ;)

Edited by lilthor, 04 November 2011 - 08:08 PM.


#27    cladking

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 08:11 PM

View Posthortie, on 04 November 2011 - 07:48 PM, said:

This was my initial reaction when I seen this as well.  However what if the water collection aspect was made after the pyramids were completed and someone thought hmmmm, we can collect this water.


No.  They built the water collection devices first just like at Machu Pichu and
probably all the massive megalithic projects.  One could come to the conclusion
that the water catchment device was needed to build the structures.  Of course if
the catchment was needed to build then it would be impossible to plug them up with
ramps.  

Note that on G2 they even removed stone to create this device and removing this
stone would have made building ramps much more difficult.  One is forced to the
conclusion that catching water was necessary and there were no ramps.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#28    cladking

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 08:23 PM

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 08:06 PM, said:

Ah yes the Nile...oh so close, yet so far from clean and safe to drink.  On the other hand, a static system capable of purifying 6,000 gallons per day while topping off cisterns of potable water would be valuable indeed.


Just walking down to the contaminated, warm, and muddy river could be fatal since
it was chock full of crocodiles.  These were not only numerous but in those days
there were monsters in there up to about 25' in lenght and could swim at speeds in
excess of 35 MPH.  (~45 knots?)

Once you got the water you'd have to carry it for miles and lift it up to 225' if
you were getting it for men working in the pyramid quarry.  

The builders were always talking about cool effervescent water like wine that filled
the winding waterways.  I might sing its praises too if thee was a choice between
drinking something like sewer water that one risked his life to obtain and worked
hard to move or Perrier that just happened to be right where you needed it in such
large quantities you needed a 770 cubit (1100') catchment device to retain it all.  
But, hey, that's just me.  Anyone who wanted to forego the cool water and go find
dirty muddy water instead always had the river just a few miles away.  

Of course the same thing applies to building pyramids;  you could strap on a 2 1/2
ton stone and drag it up a mile of ramps or sit in the shade sipping a tall cool drink
and watching the Gods build it.  Again I know which I'd choose.

Men fear the pyramid, time fears man.

#29    hortie

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 08:33 PM

View Postcladking, on 04 November 2011 - 08:11 PM, said:

No.  They built the water collection devices first just like at Machu Pichu and
probably all the massive megalithic projects.  One could come to the conclusion
that the water catchment device was needed to build the structures.  Of course if
the catchment was needed to build then it would be impossible to plug them up with
ramps.  

Note that on G2 they even removed stone to create this device and removing this
stone would have made building ramps much more difficult.  One is forced to the
conclusion that catching water was necessary and there were no ramps.
Ancient hydraulics makes much more sense to me than the ramp theory... Good one.

View Postlilthor, on 04 November 2011 - 08:06 PM, said:



You should get out more...it's easier than you think!  ;)
lol


#30    Sensible Logic

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 08:39 PM

@cladking,


Please explain something to me as I have not had the time to go and read all your posts on this.  A geyser right next to the pyramid base lifting the stones is all well and good for the lower levels of the pyramid, but as the height increases, the distance from the geyser to the level they are working on increases.  So how did they transfer the stone from the geyser to the workers at the mid and upper levels?

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