Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Did the Romans have cars?How a


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
118 replies to this topic

#16    Englishgent

Englishgent

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,909 posts
  • Joined:24 Sep 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangkok Thailand

  • all dinosaurs are thin at one end, much, much thicker in the middle, then thin again at the far end -- Monty Python

Posted 18 November 2011 - 02:26 PM

I am sure somebody will correct me if I am wrong but the pyramids were built thousands of years prior to the Roman occupation of Egypt.  But, I suppose they could have sent an army over in their Chinook helicopters after a quick email or telephone  call from the Egyptian Pharoah to the Roman Emperor requesting assistance in the building of such things The Chinooks could then have helped to carry the heavy stones from the quarries to the pyramid site and lowered them into place.  Meanwhile , the two Heads if State could survey their work from the comfort of their air conditioned car.  
I am assuming that the original poster ref this thread did so 'tongue in cheek'?  Or I sincerely hope so lol :innocent:

Edited by Englishgent, 18 November 2011 - 02:26 PM.


#17    ShadowSot

ShadowSot

    Stinky Cheese

  • Member
  • 6,874 posts
  • Joined:27 Oct 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida

  • Oops.

Posted 18 November 2011 - 04:08 PM

Quote

I am sure somebody will correct me if I am wrong but the pyramids were built thousands of years prior to the Roman occupation of Egypt.
They were built  over two thousand years before Rome.

So obviously the aliens also furnished the Romans with a Tardis.

It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone's fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I'm one of Us. I must be. I've certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We're always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things.
-Terry Pratchett

#18    Mike 215

Mike 215

    Extraterrestrial Entity

  • Banned
  • PipPipPip
  • 480 posts
  • Joined:04 Aug 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.  Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.
  As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS. Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.
  So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.


#19    Corp

Corp

    Telekinetic

  • Member
  • 6,950 posts
  • Joined:19 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ottawa

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:26 PM

There's so many historical errors in this thread I'm not even going to bother trying to correct them all.

War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth a war, is much worse...A man who has nothing which he is willing to fight for, nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety, is a miserable creature who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.

#20    Taun

Taun

    A dashing moose about town...

  • Member
  • 5,204 posts
  • Joined:19 May 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tornado Alley (Oklahoma)

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:29 PM

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.  Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.
  As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS. Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.
  So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.


First off... The Romans lacked the technological base that the Brits had in the early days of the Industrial Revolution... In Roman times, wind, water and muscle power were it. Period.
Yes, Heron (Hero?) of Alexandria did design a working steam chamber that spun about an axis - critical first stages to a steam engine... But they never could figure out what to do with it... In other words they never found a practical application for it... And a train would have been the logical first step in steam transport (as it was) rather than a free ranging car... No such evidence of a true rail system has ever been found...

Iron was still wroght by hand, not by a rolling mill, or extruded as it often is today...

Secondly.. The female figure on the coin is either a representation of the Road itself (Via Traiani) or a representation of the Goddess of Commerce (the wheel has long been a symbol of commerce reflecting the wheels of the carts and wagons)... It was a common symbol in Roman times...

Third - If the person represented on the coin is an Emperor - or a goddess - they would hardly need to back into a parking spot...


#21    HawkLord

HawkLord

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 334 posts
  • Joined:16 May 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide. South Australia

  • I reserve the right to change my mind when better and more accurate info becomes available.

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:34 PM

:rofl: :w00t: :rofl: :w00t: :rofl:    
OMG to think that this coin represents that the romans had cars is... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:   . There is no archelogical evidence to even suggest that was possible. The image is obviously that of a person wearing a robe reclining on a divan while holding a 'cart wheel' with vines in the background.

If the romans had such a thing as a 'car' and its a whooping big 'IF' you would think it would appear more often in their artwork, like on vase's, statuary and frescoes.

The rocks in my head fill the holes in yours.

It is easy to spout the wisdom of others when you have none of your own.

Insult me all you like but remember that i have a sword.

#22    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,085 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:35 PM

Why would anyone think that people would hide such an ancient invention for the general public?

Here:

The steam engine by Hero of Alexandria:

Posted Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeolipile

Ah, I see Taun already beat me to it.

.

Edited by Abramelin, 18 November 2011 - 05:37 PM.


#23    sepulchrave

sepulchrave

    Psychic Spy

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,752 posts
  • Joined:19 Apr 2009
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:38 PM

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.  Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.
  As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS. Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.
  So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.
I am glad that actual Roman writers and historians (like Pliny the Elder, Plutarch and earlier Greek historians like Herodotus) were all a part of this ancient conspiracy because their writings do not mention anything about cars.

I mean, come on. It is one thing to argue about the history of the pyramids (still crackpot, but more justifiable I think), but we still have history, math, and science textbooks from the Roman and Greek eras, and the knowledge of how to speak and read those languages was never lost to history!


#24    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,085 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:43 PM

Mike,

You may be interested in this site:

http://www.mlahanas....nAlexandria.htm



OH MY GOD !!! IT'S TRUE !!!

LOOK, LOOK :

Posted Image



Just kidding. It's from "Jean-Antoine Nollet, Leçons de Physique Expérimentale, 1764, Vol. IV"


#25    Fluffybunny

Fluffybunny

    Forum Divinity

  • Member
  • 14,136 posts
  • Joined:24 Oct 2003
  • Gender:Male

  • "Of all the tyrannies that affect mankind, tyranny in religion is the worst."
    Thomas Paine

Posted 18 November 2011 - 05:47 PM

View PostSuperglobe, on 18 November 2011 - 02:02 AM, said:

No, no they did not.

And honestly, it's strange that you chose to interpret that coin as a car. It honestly looks more like a jet-ski, which would be both somehow even more absurd, and a thousand times more hilarious.
A lot of people don't know that the Romans invaded England on the Jet-ski, it allowed them to get there so much quicker than by boat. When they made it to the English coastline, they parked the jetski's and then texted Caesar to let them know they made it ok. Caesar then tweeted that the attack was starting, not realizing that several of the English towns had donkey powered laptops. Once they knew that the Romans where coming, they hopped onto their hoverboards and shot at the Romans with laser pistols. The end result was an ugly affair.

I find history much more exciting when I make it up.

Too many people on both sides of the spectrum have fallen into this mentality that a full one half of the country are the enemy for having different beliefs...in a country based on freedom of expression. It is this infighting that allows the focus to be taken away from "we the people" being able to watch, and have control over government corruption and ineptitude that is running rampant in our leadership.

People should be working towards fixing problems, not creating them.

#26    Harte

Harte

    Supremely Educated Knower of Everything in Existence

  • Member
  • 8,758 posts
  • Joined:06 Aug 2006
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis

  • Skeptic

Posted 18 November 2011 - 06:06 PM

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.
Big talk.  All hat and no cattle?

Where's your evidence?

It's not all that surprising that the Roman's might depict a globular world, since they knew the world was round.

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS.
Sorry, but yes we can.  Neither culture had anything like this.

If you think otherwise, then you are ignorant and refuse to be otherwise.

After all, Romans could write, and we have an awful lot of their writings.

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.
The Roman Empire was almost done 2000 years ago.

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.
So, since you neither have evidence, nor enough education, to back up your wild claims, it must be other people's fault?

Also, there's nothing about humankind in the historic era (about which you are blathering) that says anything at all about the theory of evolution.

Harte

I've consulted all the sages I could find in yellow pages but there aren't many of them. - The Alan Parsons Project
Most people would die sooner than think; in fact, they do so. - Bertrand Russell
Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong. - Thomas Jefferson
Giorgio's dying Ancient Aliens internet forum

#27    Oniomancer

Oniomancer

    Soulless Minion Of Orthodoxy

  • Member
  • 3,194 posts
  • Joined:20 Jul 2008
  • Gender:Male

  • Question everything

Posted 18 November 2011 - 06:18 PM

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.  Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.
  
Here's the numismatic link again since you apparently missed it when I botched it the first time:

http://www.acsearch....=similar:273527

Each picture clicks through to enlargeable versions.

No-one has to claim anything. You can see quite clearly that there is nothing resembling a vehicle of any kind, unless she's steering a flying carpet. No wheels. No engine. No transmission. Not even a proper chassis. Just a flat surface over the words Via Traiana, a branch, and a bit of something that looks like rocks or pillows behind her. The "steering wheel" isn't even connected to anything. The robes are plainly visible as such in virtually all the other coins. No-one's going to claim them as fake on the basis of the image alone because what they actually represent should be painfully obvious to anyone.

I have little doubt your other examples are similarly mis-identified.

"Apparently the Lemurians drank Schlitz." - Intrepid "Real People" reporter on finding a mysterious artifact in the depths of Mount Shasta.

#28    Mr Right Wing

Mr Right Wing

    Poltergeist

  • Banned
  • 2,924 posts
  • Joined:16 Nov 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:18 PM

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 12:16 AM, said:

How advanced were the Romans and the ancients? Maybe they had cars. In 100 AD there was a coin minted to celebrate the making of the first highway in Rome. This coin shows the Roman emperor Trajan driving a car with his hand on a steering wheel and he is wearing a seat belt. Here is a quote from a coin magazine about this coin:
  "Via traiana, an extension of the Appian Way in southern Italy. The depiction of the personification of the highway is reminiscient of the art nouvean posters of the 20s and 30s advertising motor cars."
  Here are some web sites: http://tjbuggey.anci...fo/viatraj.html
  http:tjbuggey.ancients.info/images//viatraj.jpg
  
So what are the implications? IF the Romans had a working steam or gasoline engine, they we know how the pyramids were built.

You are quite correct that the Romans invented the steam engine and created the concept of powering a cart with it.

The official position is that they failed due to their steam engines lacking the power to drive large machines. I'm only aware of small steam powered devices being recovered from the Roman peroid so there is no evidence to suggest otherwise.


#29    Big Bad Voodoo

Big Bad Voodoo

    High priest of Darwinism

  • Member
  • 9,582 posts
  • Joined:15 Nov 2010
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:41 PM

View PostAbramelin, on 18 November 2011 - 05:35 PM, said:

Why would anyone think that people would hide such an ancient invention for the general public?

Here:

The steam engine by Hero of Alexandria:

Posted Image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeolipile

Ah, I see Taun already beat me to it.

.


Edited by the L, 18 November 2011 - 09:42 PM.

JFK: "And we are as a people, inherently and historically, opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths, and to secret proceedings.
For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy..."

#30    Gaden

Gaden

    Conspiracy Theorist

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 922 posts
  • Joined:17 Sep 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:midwest, USA

  • simple but not simple minded

Posted 18 November 2011 - 11:15 PM

View PostMike 215, on 18 November 2011 - 05:12 PM, said:

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.  Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.
  As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS. Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.
  So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.

Oh, god, stop it Mikey, my sides are hurting... aww geez, is this guy funny, or what?

I'm trying to see things from your point of view, I just can't get my head that far up my butt




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users