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Why Dinosaurs Extinct


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#1    Transform

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 10:13 AM

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Why Dinasaurs Extinct. wacko.gif Remember the Virus "SAR"Attacking human beings and now the Bird Flu. Dinosaurs may be extinct by some Virus just like "SAR" or by some virus like Bird Flu.Just look at Bird Flu for example:The Bird Flu attack those birds animals.They are then being eaten by us or other animals.So this virus continue to kill those animals feed on one another.Animals from the sea come up to the land and feed on those animals attack by this virus and bring them into the sea creatures.So in the end all die.So they are extinct in the end.Whereas for human beings,we are intelligent to know these types of virus will destroy our human race and other animals life.We destroy these affected animals to prevent it spread to kills all animals who feed on them.So we did not extinct until now.

Dinosaurs are not so intelligent then humans beings so when Virus attack they all die.

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#2    aquatus1

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 02:10 PM

An interesting theory, and possible.  The fossil record, though, asides from the extinction events that have already been correlated to environmental disasters, shows the final extinction to have taken several thousands of years to come about.  I would think that a virus virulent enough to affect all the dinosaurs would act a bit faster.


#3    panther10758

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 02:19 PM

My guess would be a climate change over time Dinosaurs were cold blooded therefore a drastic climate change would have a serious impact on them.


#4    radio_flux

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 03:02 PM

I have only a moment, but would like to say first, I know almost nothing
about the great age of reptiles, except that they lived for a very, very
long time. I can only imagine that during that time, and prior to that
era, many species went extinct, and afterwards, many others, as well.

They certainly had their fare share of time! But I would guess that the most
difficult to kill off are the simple bacteria. They are found at volcanic
vents, very deep in the ocean. They live off a strange mixture of chemicals,
without even needing sunlight energy. Perhaps the early planet was dark,
with many long eons of cloudy days, and only bacteria could survive,
and so some of them live on- and have existed longer than anything else!

And, I was reading about our Galaxy and stars; and how stars come and go.
Sometimes they just fade like old soldiers.
Sometimes they go out in glory- supernovae.

I read that ten million years ago, there were some supernovae that happened,
which did unleash energy our way. Those events carried a lot of iron nuclei,
the kind found in old stars, in their core, but not found on Earth from any
typical terrestrial chemistry reactions.

The blast waves sent (?) high energy cosmic particles, x-rays and gamma rays.
They killed off some organisms- simple plant and bacteria life in the oceans
and lakes. Or at least, a lot was affected adversely, they speculate.

Could it have hurt dinosaurs, if during their era, some cosmic energy
or astroid affected them, weakened them, change their environment...?
I once read how wooly mammoths suvived for an additional time,
even though they were caught up in climate change. The planet was
warming, and they had heavy fur coats. Those that lived the longest,
those groups moved north. They moved until they just died out from
the heat and stress, and man hunting them down, too.

The last skeletal remains were found in Canada, in a strata that
showed many plant forms particular to tropical climate, the kind that
happened as the Ice Age was receading from the lower latitudes.

Perhaps like the others here stated, climate and environment were
a big part of it. The only different thing that I want to say is that
I was reading some information on ice core studies, recently.
There was a young, but respected, graduate student who was called to
the White House, along with a few others, to discuss climate matters.
The Vice-President was interested in the work the grad student had
done, because he had some 'evidence' that in the past, climate shifts
have sometimes occured in very short time frames.
Changes of a significant kind, that could put severe pressure on
weather patterns, and some plant and animal populations.

The idea was not held in any serious regard until his ice core studies.

Edited by radio_flux, 14 September 2004 - 03:05 PM.


#5    moe eubleck

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 03:06 PM

the dinosaurs left our planet on great space craft. This was after they evolved into bipedal beings and learned the ways of sciene . They now groove in the andromeda galaxy with the Space lobsters.

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#6    NightMoon

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 07:55 PM

QUOTE(panther10758 @ Sep 14 2004, 03:19 PM)
My guess would be a climate change over time Dinosaurs were cold blooded therefore a drastic climate change would have a serious impact on them.

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Are you sure about that? Reptiles are cold blooded but dinosaurs were warm blooded. Dinosaur bones were hollow like birds, and reptile bones are solid. Even though dinosaurs were neither bird or reptile, they were also related to both at some point.

Interesting that a disease wiped them out. I always looked at it this way: Climate change at first, then changes in mammals, then a disease and survivors were a few dinosaur species that later evolved again and died out. I wouldn't be surprised if some dinosaurs remained alive when human beings walked the earth.

Edited by NightMoon, 14 September 2004 - 07:57 PM.


#7    mr_halo

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 08:07 PM


i always thought it was a meteor that wiped out the dinosaurs, it hit the earth led to climate change, blocked out the sun and so on....

i'm not expert though, so i don't really know  rolleyes.gif

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#8    cor_raven

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 12:46 AM

likely people will still be aguing over this until we go extict, and then billions years later sentient squids will wonder how we dispaeared wink2.gif

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#9    Talon

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 12:56 AM

QUOTE
Are you sure about that? Reptiles are cold blooded but dinosaurs were warm blooded. Dinosaur bones were hollow like birds, and reptile bones are solid. Even though dinosaurs were neither bird or reptile, they were also related to both at some point.


Actually dinosaurs were (a sub-group of) reptiles, of which a strand evolved into the bird family. tongue.gif

And indeed, most palaeontologists are convinced they were warm-blooded. thumbsup.gif

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#10    Aquaryus

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 06:14 AM

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I wouldn't be surprised if some dinosaurs remained alive when human beings walked the earth.


Actually, I remember hearing something within the last year that scientists discovered human bones within the same area as dino bones... or something like that. Can anyone else validate this? That would have been scary as hell trying to live with school bus size creatures casually strolling around in your yard.


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#11    Cobalt Demon

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 08:36 AM

Aqua, my anthropology teacher who was a archaeologist talk about that other day, he say that to untrainned eyes it seems like as if they die at same time. But when they bring in a Geogologist they immidately point out many large flaws and easily confirmed that they both exist at different time and that the bones somehow get down there. If you want I can email him and ask where he got this info.

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#12    Sir_Oguh2

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 10:55 PM

dinosaurs didnt ALL extinct. what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?! of course they are dinosaurs


#13    cor_raven

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 11:38 PM

QUOTE(Sir_Oguh2 @ Sep 15 2004, 11:55 PM)
dinosaurs didnt ALL extinct. what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?! of course they are dinosaurs

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We don't know if they exist, s we can't say that they count as example

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#14    Sir_Oguh2

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Posted 15 September 2004 - 11:53 PM

why not?


#15    Talon

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Posted 16 September 2004 - 03:28 AM

QUOTE
what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?!


plesiosors are not dinosaurs

and mokele mbembe has yet to be proven to be a dinosaur

Edited by Talon S., 16 September 2004 - 03:28 AM.

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