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Sumatran Orang Pendek Hairs Match Rock Hyrax


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#16    Lilly

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 07:50 PM

Honestly, I actually think it would be easier/shorter just to list the unknown animals that aren't related to hyraxes.*

* according to tailormaneinafog

Edited by Lilly, 19 February 2012 - 07:52 PM.
clarification

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#17    grendille

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 08:43 PM

Just out of curiosity what are your credentials tailor...  I mean thus far you have made claims that lead me to believe you are some sort of Astrophysicist that minored in forensic biology and dabbles in anthropology.  Perhaps you are just more intuitive than I am but when i read the reports and look at the "pictoral evidence" that you post the reports leave me with more questions than answers and with the pics i can't tell a Hyrax's ventral hair cross-section from a human hair cross-section.  Help me understand your qualifications to make these claims please.


#18    MID

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 08:44 PM

View Posttailormaneinafog, on 15 February 2012 - 01:13 PM, said:

No need. The research team on the Orang Pendek is behind me on this one. Wait until you see it on the tv news...


I'm sure many of us will miss that one.

You apparently have seen this largely legendary bi-pedal mammal, since you state that you're ahead of the curve on this thing...(I am pleased for you!).


It's rather funy how they determined that the hairs were from an animal that's never actually been confirmed to exist and never classified or photographed, or even seen by a scientist.


Wondering if there's a point to the prattlings about small mammalians.
Do you think it'll make the TV news?


Wait forget that!
Given the things that make the TV news, I have no doubt this'll make it some time.



#19    Yes_Man

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 08:46 PM

You know he hasn't actually done any research.


#20    Morreh

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:53 PM

View PostLilly, on 19 February 2012 - 07:50 PM, said:

Honestly, I actually think it would be easier/shorter just to list the unknown animals that aren't related to hyraxes.*

* according to tailormaneinafog
He's gonna say we're related to them next, isn't he? Or has he already?

Bad machine.

#21    DieChecker

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 02:26 AM

View Posttailormaneinafog, on 14 February 2012 - 04:07 PM, said:

Here's the professional report Organic Evidence Confirms Existence Of Orang Pendek and here's the Ventral hairs of the rock hyrax. It's a better match than all the others!! :)
Superficial resemblance only. You're ignoring the other hundred details of hair morphology that say the "Orang Pendek" hair is ape hair.

View Posttailormaneinafog, on 15 February 2012 - 01:13 PM, said:

No need. The research team on the Orang Pendek is behind me on this one. Wait until you see it on the tv news...
This, I would like to see.

View PostWearer of Hats, on 18 February 2012 - 07:30 AM, said:

You know what's sad? Draconic Chronicler had more evidence for his theories and a better debating style.
Agree!  :tu:

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#22    DieChecker

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 02:37 AM

Reasons a Hyrax can't be a werewolf, dogman, bigfoot or Orang Pendek. (Anyone else please feel free to add on.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyrax

Quote

Hyraxes retain a number of early mammalian characteristics; in particular, they have poorly developed internal temperature regulation (which they deal with by huddling together for warmth, and by basking in the sun like reptiles).
Many, no... Most, of the cryptids that Tail says are hyrax, are not just active at night, but nocturnal. They are not a good fit on a hyrax, as they need warm weather and sunlight to add to their metabolism.

Quote

All modern hyraxes are members of the family Procaviidae (the only living family within the Hyracoidea) and are found only in Africa and the Middle East. In the past, however, hyraxes were more diverse and widespread. The order first appears in the fossil record at a site in the Middle East in the form of Dimaitherium, 37 million years ago.[12] For many millions of years, hyraxes were the primary terrestrial herbivore in Africa, just as odd-toed ungulates were in the Americas. Through the middle to late Eocene, there were many different species,[13] the largest of them about the weight of a small horse, the smallest the size of a mouse. During the Miocene, however, competition from the newly developed bovidsŚvery efficient grazers and browsersŚpushed the hyraxes out of the prime territory and into marginal niches. Nevertheless, the order remained widespread, diverse and successful as late as the end of the Pliocene (about two million years ago) with representatives throughout most of Africa, Europe and Asia.
And not one single skeletal remain has show bipedalism. All hyraxes were 4 legged grazers. They got wiped out because they could not adapt fast enough.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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#23    DieChecker

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 02:45 AM

http://www.guardian....ve-orang-pendek

Quote

The hairs will be sent off for DNA testing to Professor Bryan Sykes, Professor Todd Disotell, Dr Tom Gilbert and Lars Thomas, but we won't get the results for a few months. Copies of the cast will be sent to leading primatologists.
I wonder if they heard anything back yet. My guess is no. Either that, or they got negative results and thus don't want to publish the results online.

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

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Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#24    Morreh

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 04:00 AM

I'm sorry, but how many threads about Hyrax's is the OP going to make before he admits he's trolling?

Bad machine.

#25    NatureBoff

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 10:46 AM

View Postgrendille, on 19 February 2012 - 08:43 PM, said:

Just out of curiosity what are your credentials tailor...  I mean thus far you have made claims that lead me to believe you are some sort of Astrophysicist that minored in forensic biology and dabbles in anthropology.  Perhaps you are just more intuitive than I am but when i read the reports and look at the "pictoral evidence" that you post the reports leave me with more questions than answers and with the pics i can't tell a Hyrax's ventral hair cross-section from a human hair cross-section.  Help me understand your qualifications to make these claims please.
I'm not the most qualified person in the whole world, no, but I do have a science degree in Computing With Astronomy. I did hold a scientific research post for 8 years before leaving for 'world travel'. I've always been obsessed with a theory of everything and cryptozoology. I would have never believed in 'were-creatures' myself had I not looked at all the evidence and carefully remembered my own seemingly inexplicable experiences.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#26    grendille

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:50 AM

View Posttailormaneinafog, on 20 February 2012 - 10:46 AM, said:

I'm not the most qualified person in the whole world, no, but I do have a science degree in Computing With Astronomy. I did hold a scientific research post for 8 years before leaving for 'world travel'. I've always been obsessed with a theory of everything and cryptozoology. I would have never believed in 'were-creatures' myself had I not looked at all the evidence and carefully remembered my own seemingly inexplicable experiences.


One more question... it seems that your theories are all based on one creature mimicking the behavior of another for various reasons.  Why then do you insist on using the "were" word.  It's a bit on a misnomer


#27    ealdwita

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:05 PM

I encountered many tales of the Orang Pendek during my stay in Borneo in the 60's. The local populace used to leave offerings of tobacco out to keep the creature content. My guess is that the many reported sightings may be either the Orang Utan or an immature Sun Bear (another shy - but quite real - local animal). The Sun Bear explanation is supported by the fact that 'Pendeks' have often been seen on the outskirts of fields planted with ginger root. Many species of bear would disembowel their own grandmothers for ginger root! On the other hand, most locals I've met, (some of them very well-educated) believe implicitly in Orang Pendek, and with the Indonesia/Sumatra/Borneo complex consisting of over 17,500 islands, there's plenty of places for a few 'short persons' to remain undiscovered!

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#28    NatureBoff

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:42 PM

View Postgrendille, on 20 February 2012 - 11:50 AM, said:

One more question... it seems that your theories are all based on one creature mimicking the behavior of another for various reasons.  Why then do you insist on using the "were" word.  It's a bit on a misnomer
It's the old english form of 'were-wolf' or 'were-boar'. It's a good name imo and describes an animal species which mimics another openly aggressive animal species in the local habitat. The were-animal itself is therefore a master of passive aggression. The males only need to mimick a male of an openly aggressive species to be able to ward of transgressors from their territory and still remain elusive and 'unknown'. The females would use sexual selection based on how effective they thought the male disguise was. This way a speedy evolutionary avenue is open for something which to us seems extra-ordinary.

The last 50,000 years would have led to a were-creature/human co-evolution which has ended with today's working equilibrium, Super-predatory humans

Edited by tailormaneinafog, 20 February 2012 - 12:56 PM.

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#29    NatureBoff

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:45 PM

View Postealdwita, on 20 February 2012 - 12:05 PM, said:

I encountered many tales of the Orang Pendek during my stay in Borneo in the 60's. The local populace used to leave offerings of tobacco out to keep the creature content. My guess is that the many reported sightings may be either the Orang Utan or an immature Sun Bear (another shy - but quite real - local animal). The Sun Bear explanation is supported by the fact that 'Pendeks' have often been seen on the outskirts of fields planted with ginger root. Many species of bear would disembowel their own grandmothers for ginger root! On the other hand, most locals I've met, (some of them very well-educated) believe implicitly in Orang Pendek, and with the Indonesia/Sumatra/Borneo complex consisting of over 17,500 islands, there's plenty of places for a few 'short persons' to remain undiscovered!
Hi ealdwita. Thanks for the extra info, very interesting. The 'sun bear' proposal would have been considered by all the experts and locals alike. People aren't stupid. They would have been filmed and seen with more clarity if it was just sun bears, surely?

The object, known by the locals as "Bicho Voador" (Flying Animal), or "Bicho Sugador" (Sucking Animal), has the shape of a rounded ship and attacks people in isolation.

#30    Englishgent

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:11 PM

View Posttailormaneinafog, on 20 February 2012 - 10:46 AM, said:

I'm not the most qualified person in the whole world, no, but I do have a science degree in Computing With Astronomy. I did hold a scientific research post for 8 years before leaving for 'world travel'. I've always been obsessed with a theory of everything and cryptozoology. I would have never believed in 'were-creatures' myself had I not looked at all the evidence and carefully remembered my own seemingly inexplicable experiences.

So Tailor, you obviously are not stupid with that sort of degree and past employment, yet you can see things like helicopter shadows and say they are some sort of physical being? (as per a previous post)
I find this a little hard to believe. Maybe your obsession with these alleged creatures has got the better of you and you are no longer thinking scientifically. :mellow:





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