Jump to content




Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries! Please sign in or create an account to start posting and to access a host of extra features.


- - - - -

Scientists sign deal to clone woolly mammoth


  • Please log in to reply
46 replies to this topic

#1    Still Waters

Still Waters

    Deeply Mysterious

  • 38,327 posts
  • Joined:01 Jun 2008
  • Gender:Female

  • "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." - Albert Einstein

Posted 13 March 2012 - 04:05 PM

www.telegraph.co.uk said:

Russian and South Korean scientists signed a deal on Tuesday on joint research intended to recreate a woolly mammoth, an animal which last walked the earth some 10,000 years ago.

The deal was signed by Vasily Vasiliev, vice rector of North-Eastern Federal University of the Sakha Republic, and controversial cloning pioneer Hwang Woo-Suk of South Korea's Sooam Biotech Research Foundation.

Hwang was a national hero until some of his research into creating human stem cells was found in 2006 to have been faked. But his work in creating Snuppy, the world's first cloned dog, in 2005, has been verified by experts.

Stem cell scientists are now setting their sights on the extinct woolly mammoth, after global warming thawed Siberia's permafrost and uncovered remains of the animal.

Posted Image Read more...


Posted Image

#2    and then

and then

    Abyssus Abyssum Invocat

  • Member
  • 13,794 posts
  • Joined:15 Dec 2011
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Land's End

  • Because what came before never seems enough...

Posted 13 March 2012 - 04:28 PM

Slightly off topic but I wonder how old the first human clone will be before being introduced to the world?  No one says much in the media but you know it's being planned and pursued.
Seeing a wooly mammoth would be awesome!

  We've cast the world, we've set the stage,
  for what could be, the darkest age...

#3    RockabyeBillie

RockabyeBillie

    Remote Viewer

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 623 posts
  • Joined:25 Jun 2007
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:orlando

  • And a million baneful words couldn't bring me to my knees.

Posted 13 March 2012 - 04:34 PM

Yaaay! I am one step closer to getting my Compsognathus!

Posted Image

Whether you think you can or whether you think you cant, you're right! -Henry Ford

#4    Imaginarynumber1

Imaginarynumber1

    I am not an irrational number

  • Member
  • 4,673 posts
  • Joined:22 Mar 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio

Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:30 PM

I want a mini mammoth.
Large enough that I could still ride it, though.

"A cat has nine lives. For three he plays, for three he strays, and for the last three he stays."


July 17th, 2008 (Full moon the next night)

RAPTORS! http://www.unexplain...pic=233151&st=0


#5    DieChecker

DieChecker

    I'm a Rogue Scholar

  • Member
  • 18,306 posts
  • Joined:21 Nov 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon, USA

  • Hey, I'm not wrong. I'm just not completely right.

Posted 13 March 2012 - 06:17 PM

Munch munch. Humm... tastes like buffalo....

Here at Intel we make processors on 12 inch wafers. And, the individual processors on the wafers are called die. And, I am employed to check these die. That is why I am the DieChecker.

At times one remains faithful to a cause only because its opponents do not cease to be insipid. - Friedrich Nietzsche

Qualifications? This is cryptozoology, dammit! All that is required is the spirit of adventure. - Night Walker

#6    Falael

Falael

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 38 posts
  • Joined:19 Jun 2010

Posted 14 March 2012 - 11:29 AM

I must have heard this mammoth story a hundred times, the first one back in the eighties when I was a kid, and no mammoth loomed on the horizon up to now. I guess they're expecting donations for their research, and then bye bye the mammoth and hello the Hawaian dolphins !
Incoming article : "A joint American and European research effort has been launched in a bid to create a Cloak of Invisibility"


#7    Drev

Drev

    Apparition

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 252 posts
  • Joined:27 Mar 2005
  • Gender:Male

Posted 14 March 2012 - 11:53 AM

View PostFalael, on 14 March 2012 - 11:29 AM, said:

I must have heard this mammoth story a hundred times, the first one back in the eighties when I was a kid, and no mammoth loomed on the horizon up to now. I guess they're expecting donations for their research, and then bye bye the mammoth and hello the Hawaian dolphins !
Incoming article : "A joint American and European research effort has been launched in a bid to create a Cloak of Invisibility"

Already created...somewhat.

http://en.wikipedia....of_invisibility


#8    Pale

Pale

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 21 posts
  • Joined:13 Mar 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yellowknife, Northwest-Territories, CA

  • "Knowledge to its literal is parallel to the thought and feeling of it's understanding." T.Nasholm

Posted 14 March 2012 - 03:32 PM

If successful this could prove to be a viable food source if domesticated, due to the sheer volume of mass edible meat that could be harvested off the animal. If inbred with a successful offspring continuously over time could result in a close resemblance to a real mammoth.

Quote

Can the long-extinct mammoth be resurrected through the alchemy of modern biology?

Quote

Such hopes were raised yet again last week by the recent discovery, in the permafrost of Siberia’s Yamal peninsula, of a 6-month-old female that died perhaps 10,000 years ago.

“It’s a lovely little baby mammoth indeed, found in perfect condition,” Alexei Tikhonov, the deputy director of the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, told Reuters last week.

The best hope would be if some of her eggs had been preserved in arrested state, much the way human eggs are stored in the freezers of fertility clinics. Sperm from an elephant could possibly tickle the egg awake from its long hibernation.
But mammoths rarely die in the controlled-temperature conditions necessary to preserve eggs without harm. Intact organs are seldom found. To retrieve viable sperm or eggs “seems an even more remote chance,” said Alex Greenwood, a biologist at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., who has worked on mammoth DNA.

The alternative, far more laborious, would be to analyze the sequence of DNA units in the mammoth’s genome, make a copy of the DNA, and have it take over an elephant’s egg.
Posted Image

Each of those steps has long seemed impossible. But advances in the last few months have made each seem slightly less daunting. Analyzing the DNA sequence is complicated by the fact that ancient DNA, when it can be retrieved at all from fossil bones, is always highly degraded. The genome in every cell breaks down after death into thousands of small fragments of DNA. Posted Image

But a new kind of DNA decoding machine happens to use such fragments as its starting material. At McMaster University in Canada, Hendrik Poinar and Régis Debruyne plan to use of one the machines, from 454 Life Sciences, to reconstruct a mammoth genome. The remaining obstacle is money. If they had $1 million, they could generate a rough draft of a mammoth genome in about a month, Dr. Debruyne said.

The reconstructed sequence of DNA units would then need to be turned into an actual mammoth genome. Mammalian genomes are made up of chromosomes of about 100 million DNA units in length and are beyond the capacity of current synthesis. Still, researchers at the Venter Institute in Rockville, Md., say they are close to synthesizing the genome of a bacterium that is 500,000 units long.

The third problem is that the DNA molecule in each chromosome is festooned with special proteins that control and read out its genetic information. No one knows how to add these proteins to DNA, but Venter Institute researchers showed last month that, at least in the case of bacteria, a naked piece of DNA inserted into a cell will somehow acquire the right control proteins and then take over the cell.

Resurrecting the mammoth is still not possible, but has become at least worth thinking about
.

-Information gathered from:-> http://www.nytimes.c...ew/15basic.html
-Picture taken from Google.

Edited by Pale, 14 March 2012 - 03:51 PM.


#9    Arawyn

Arawyn

    Alien Embryo

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 99 posts
  • Joined:08 Jun 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Erie, PA

  • "Insanity is like gravity. All it takes is a little push" - The Joker

Posted 14 March 2012 - 03:37 PM

yah, one step closer a aurochs back to life! Giant steaks, here I come!


#10    Abramelin

Abramelin

    -

  • Member
  • 18,109 posts
  • Joined:07 May 2005
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:"Here the tide is ruled, by the wind, the moon and us."

  • God created the world, but the Dutch created the Netherlands

Posted 14 March 2012 - 04:06 PM

View Postand then, on 13 March 2012 - 04:28 PM, said:

Slightly off topic but I wonder how old the first human clone will be before being introduced to the world?  No one says much in the media but you know it's being planned and pursued.
Seeing a wooly mammoth would be awesome!

I think it is very possible a human has already been cloned, but the scientific community will have to stay silent about him/her for this person's own safety (think religious nuts being convinced s/he is the son/daughter of Lucifer or something, that s/he has no 'soul' and all that mind-numbing idiocy).


#11    Mr Right Wing

Mr Right Wing

    Poltergeist

  • Banned
  • 2,924 posts
  • Joined:16 Nov 2011
  • Gender:Not Selected

Posted 14 March 2012 - 04:10 PM

View PostArawyn, on 14 March 2012 - 03:37 PM, said:

yah, one step closer a aurochs back to life! Giant steaks, here I come!

Tyranosauros steaks

Mmmmmmmmm


#12    King Fluffs

King Fluffs

    The Resident Misanthrope

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,111 posts
  • Joined:23 Dec 2010
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:England

  • Shadows protect my angel in white...

Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:02 PM

I can't wait to eat a mammoth.


#13    MJNYC

MJNYC

    Ectoplasmic Residue

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 176 posts
  • Joined:31 Jan 2011
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NYC

  • The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated. Mohandas K. Gandhi

Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:38 PM

OMG, Pale - who eat's elephant? So gross and what an awful thought.  ;\


#14    S2F

S2F

    Bloodstained Hurricane

  • Member
  • 6,629 posts
  • Joined:22 May 2008
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Right behind you!

  • If you don't believe the sun will rise
    Stand alone and greet the coming night
    In the last remaining light -Audioslave

Posted 14 March 2012 - 07:10 PM

My question would be why? Why clone the Mammoth? Just because we can? What would be the life of a returned Mammoth? Would they be reintroduced to the wild? Again, to what end? So big game hunters will have something new to shoot at? I don't know, I see several ways in which this would be a poor decision for the Mammoth. Maybe it's just me though.

"You want to discuss plausibility then you have to accept reality." -Mattshark

"Don't argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level then beat you with experience." -Obviousman

You know... the plural of ``anecdote'' is not ``data''. Similarly, the plural of ``random fact'' is not ``mystical symbolism''. -sepulchrave


#15    CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

CRIPTIC CHAMELEON

    Paranormal Investigator

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 766 posts
  • Joined:27 Feb 2012
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Annwyn

  • Without going out of my door
    I can know all things of earth
    Without looking out of my window
    I could know the ways of heaven

Posted 14 March 2012 - 09:13 PM

Why don't they clone Albert Einstein, at least he might have something useful to say on this subject.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users