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Domestic life in 1950s Britain


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#1    Still Waters

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 03:35 PM

www.dailymail.co.uk said:

Unchanged since the 1950s, this amazing house, once the home of Liverpool's most celebrated photographer, gives a fascinating glimpse into a bygone era.

The Georgian terrace on Rodney Street in Central Liverpool, was owned by Edward Chambré Hardman and his wife Margaret who lived and worked there for 40 years, keeping almost everything and changing very little.

Completely original, down to the post-war rations in the kitchen cupboard, bakelite telephone in the office, the building is now preserved for posterity by the National Trust and open to visitors.

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#2    spud the mackem

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 05:45 PM

I once lodged in house like that in "the pool".but the landlady would never put up with that untidyness,she used to scrub and whiten the front step,lovely people.I worked on the docks and loved the shown scenes,brought back a lot of memories,then I was moved to London....Yuk

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#3    susieice

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 03:33 AM

I haven't seen an over the tubside soap dish since I was a kid. I can remember pots and pans that looked like that. No teflon there. And I'm American. Thanks for the post SW.

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#4    spud the mackem

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 10:16 AM

View Postsusieice, on 18 March 2012 - 03:33 AM, said:

I haven't seen an over the tubside soap dish since I was a kid. I can remember pots and pans that looked like that. No teflon there. And I'm American. Thanks for the post SW.
little black and white t.v.'s to,no colour them days,thats if you could afford one,my first wage was £1.00 per week,or about a $2.50 your money.but we were happy,no wars for a while.No McDonalds,Hardly any cars about and no Motorways.cheers.

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#5    susieice

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 09:06 PM

OMG! The first TV I can remember having was a black and white Motorola. Highways weren't what they are now, and there were nowhere near as many cars. An average of 1 per household unless a child had a job and could afford to have one. Now you see 3-4 cars per household. I have a neighbor that has 6. Everybody who lives there has one. The war didn't have as much impact here in the US but you're so right. Life was so much happier and easier then. When I tell my kids that in the early 60s ice cream cones were 10 cents and candy bars 5 cents they look at me like I'm nuts. When I started driving in the early 70s gas was 32 cents a gallon. Now I can't even find a cents symbol on my keyboard, just a dollar sign. :rofl:  
Thanks for the good memories.

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#6    spud the mackem

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 11:23 PM

View Postsusieice, on 18 March 2012 - 09:06 PM, said:

OMG! The first TV I can remember having was a black and white Motorola. Highways weren't what they are now, and there were nowhere near as many cars. An average of 1 per household unless a child had a job and could afford to have one. Now you see 3-4 cars per household. I have a neighbor that has 6. Everybody who lives there has one. The war didn't have as much impact here in the US but you're so right. Life was so much happier and easier then. When I tell my kids that in the early 60s ice cream cones were 10 cents and candy bars 5 cents they look at me like I'm nuts. When I started driving in the early 70s gas was 32 cents a gallon. Now I can't even find a cents symbol on my keyboard, just a dollar sign. :rofl:  
Thanks for the good memories.
Hi,I could go on,like did you have a radio with valves in it,  ? cell phones,g.s.p.sat nav,not invented,a car would cost about $1200 new.Most airoplanes still had propellors,ha ha,and some ships had steam engines with coal fires,no dishwashing machines ..and now our petrol(gas) is nearly $3.00 a LITRE.Thanks for your views,Best Wishes,cheers.

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#7    susieice

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 01:26 AM

Haha, I don't remember valves but I remember tubes. Even TV sets used them. When I was about 8 or 9, one of my brothers bought me a new transistor radio for Christmas. It even had an earplug. The only dishwasher you had were your hands. Everything was done by hand. I remember my grandmother's washing machine. It didn't have cycles. You filled it and put the clothes through ringer rollers to take the water out. Then they went on a clothesline. My mom kept that in a pantry closet for a long time. When I was a real little kid back in the late 50s, I didn't wear Pampers either. My mom used to put my cloth diapers out in the yard to sun bleach. Funny what you can remember when you think back.
Best wishes and take care also.

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#8    spud the mackem

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 09:17 AM

View Postsusieice, on 19 March 2012 - 01:26 AM, said:

Haha, I don't remember valves but I remember tubes. Even TV sets used them. When I was about 8 or 9, one of my brothers bought me a new transistor radio for Christmas. It even had an earplug. The only dishwasher you had were your hands. Everything was done by hand. I remember my grandmother's washing machine. It didn't have cycles. You filled it and put the clothes through ringer rollers to take the water out. Then they went on a clothesline. My mom kept that in a pantry closet for a long time. When I was a real little kid back in the late 50s, I didn't wear Pampers either. My mom used to put my cloth diapers out in the yard to sun bleach. Funny what you can remember when you think back.
Best wishes and take care also.
Hi,again...Your "tubes" were my "valves",ha,ha.When I got married the whole reception at the best Hotel in town cost £185,about $380 dollars,and that was expensive..(Wife still has receipt)..I used to visit Pennsylvania,and Baltimore regularly,on a Brit Merchant ship,and a big hit was taking home vinyl record disks of Elvis ,Tina Turner etc,they were very expensive here,and now they are worth a fortune to collectors.Happy days eh !.I guess the kids nowadays have it easy with p.c's ,coloured t.v etc..Its funny how our language is slightly different as your diapers were called "nappies" here,and have I spelled "coloured" right ?...no its "colored" in U.S. ha ha ,as long as we are friends who cares...Bye for now,regards...

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#9    Taun

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 01:58 PM

In the early 60's I got my 'spending money' by mowing lawns (this is well before the adults took this job opportunity away from kids)... I would mow fornt and back yards, hand trim the grass around the house, drive and sidewalk - and charge $5.00

With $1 I could go to the gas station (convienence stores did not sell gas back then) and get a gallon of gas for 8 cents (normal price was 12 cents or so but there was always a 'gas war' between competeing stations), a 16 ounce bottle of soda (or pop if you prefer), some candy, a couple comic books and still have 5 cents left over...

I worked by butt off in the summer, but I had spending money all year at school...

I use to think that if I ever got a job that paid $5 an hour I would be living on easy street   :lol:

A kid could ride their bicycle on city streets (in housing neighborhhods anyway) and not worry about traffic, parents didn't think twice about letting kids play outdoors unsupervised, and many times I would spend Saturday mornings at the local theater watching cheesy sci-fi movies, and not an adult in sight...

Of course the problem with looking back at a 'golden age' is that there were many bad things at the same time... Many people had it pretty rough, and not every kid had a good life...


#10    Still Waters

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 02:28 PM

View Postsusieice, on 19 March 2012 - 01:26 AM, said:

Haha, I don't remember valves but I remember tubes. Even TV sets used them. When I was about 8 or 9, one of my brothers bought me a new transistor radio for Christmas. It even had an earplug. The only dishwasher you had were your hands. Everything was done by hand. I remember my grandmother's washing machine. It didn't have cycles. You filled it and put the clothes through ringer rollers to take the water out. Then they went on a clothesline. My mom kept that in a pantry closet for a long time. When I was a real little kid back in the late 50s, I didn't wear Pampers either. My mom used to put my cloth diapers out in the yard to sun bleach. Funny what you can remember when you think back.
My grandmother had one of those washing machines, only hers was in an outhouse not in her kitchen. I used to help her sometimes but she wouldn't let me feed the washing through the rollers (mangle) for fear I'd get my fingers trapped.

She also had a sewing machine with a foot pedal to operate it. She never had a fridge or freezer either and kept all her food in her pantry and had a bread bin. Mind you she lived very close to the shops so could get fresh bread and milk whenever she wanted.

I've still got my transistor radio  B)

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#11    Still Waters

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 02:50 PM

View PostTaun, on 19 March 2012 - 01:58 PM, said:

A kid could ride their bicycle on city streets (in housing neighborhhods anyway) and not worry about traffic, parents didn't think twice about letting kids play outdoors unsupervised, and many times I would spend Saturday mornings at the local theater watching cheesy sci-fi movies, and not an adult in sight...
Same here! I hated being stuck indoors and was always out playing, ball, skipping, roller skates, scooter, swings, hula hoop lol. anything that I could do outside. As long as my parents knew where I was, that was fine by them. I always told them before I went out where I was going.

Heck I even used to help the local milkman deliver milk. That was when milk came in glass bottles, one pint and half pint sizes. I'd sit on the back of his trailer and hold on for dear life lol when it was hitched to the back of his tractor. That would be against the law now. We lived across from the farm so I spent a lot of time there, it was great fun, he let me go with him when he bought the cows in for milking and I'd help put feed out for them too.

When I was in primary school we used to get a free bottle of milk every day. When it was very cold the milk would be frozen and the teacher would put the bottles against the warm pipes to thaw them out. That made the milk taste disgusting lol I hated that.

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#12    spud the mackem

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:43 PM

View PostTaun, on 19 March 2012 - 01:58 PM, said:

In the early 60's I got my 'spending money' by mowing lawns (this is well before the adults took this job opportunity away from kids)... I would mow fornt and back yards, hand trim the grass around the house, drive and sidewalk - and charge $5.00

With $1 I could go to the gas station (convienence stores did not sell gas back then) and get a gallon of gas for 8 cents (normal price was 12 cents or so but there was always a 'gas war' between competeing stations), a 16 ounce bottle of soda (or pop if you prefer), some candy, a couple comic books and still have 5 cents left over...

I worked by butt off in the summer, but I had spending money all year at school...

I use to think that if I ever got a job that paid $5 an hour I would be living on easy street   :lol:

A kid could ride their bicycle on city streets (in housing neighborhhods anyway) and not worry about traffic, parents didn't think twice about letting kids play outdoors unsupervised, and many times I would spend Saturday mornings at the local theater watching cheesy sci-fi movies, and not an adult in sight...

Of course the problem with looking back at a 'golden age' is that there were many bad things at the same time... Many people had it pretty rough, and not every kid had a good life...
     Hi,Taun, agree with you above I had a paper round which paid about 75 cents a week,but you could get into the movies for 10 cents and walk home 5 miles saved you 8 cents on the bus..In my village it was considered unsociable if you locked your door before midnight,as people used to "pop" in for a chat and a "cuppa" (tea) and  help with whatever project or chore you were doing..Nowadays if you go out alone walking,after dark, you stand a good chance of being mugged,as the town I now live in turns off the street lights about 8 p.m.to save energy.No red and blues about,they go to the city about 10 miles away.cheers.

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#13    spud the mackem

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:54 PM

Hi ,Still Waters, Thanks for bringing up this subject and the pictures.I sailed out of Liverpool a couple of times on a "two fat & one lean" Harrison Line ship,it certainly brings back the "good old days"."Life was grim and times were hard ..but you were ok with your union card" ha .cheers

(1) try your best, ............if that dont work.
(2) try your second best, ........if that dont work
(3) give up you aint gonna win

#14    susieice

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 12:27 AM

View PostStill Waters, on 19 March 2012 - 02:28 PM, said:

My grandmother had one of those washing machines, only hers was in an outhouse not in her kitchen. I used to help her sometimes but she wouldn't let me feed the washing through the rollers (mangle) for fear I'd get my fingers trapped.

She also had a sewing machine with a foot pedal to operate it. She never had a fridge or freezer either and kept all her food in her pantry and had a bread bin. Mind you she lived very close to the shops so could get fresh bread and milk whenever she wanted.

I've still got my transistor radio  B)
That's funny. My grandmother used to say the same thing to me about keeping my hands away from the rollers. I remember Mom's old Singer with the footpedals. We did have a fridge but we had a milkbox on the porch steps. The milkman would come and put bottles of milk and butter into it. I still have a scar on my left hand between my thumb and forefinger where I fell when I was about 4 yrs. old and cut myself when the bottle I was carrying broke. 14 stitches to close it and 2 on the pinky finger of my right hand. OMG, now I have radio envy.  :w00t:

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Opponere draconem est prehendere vitam

"I'm sure the universe is full of intelligent life. It's just been too intelligent to come here." Arthur C. Clarke

#15    Eldorado

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 01:59 AM

In the mid to late sixties we had two sinks side by side in the kitchen. One was for clothes and the other for dishes and it had a wringer (iron mangle thingy) in between.
Can remember getting a bath in the deep sink.... lol... seriously!  I must have been about three or four years old.

(Happy Days)





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