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Did dinosaurs live in the water ?


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#1    Saru

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 08:45 AM

A startling new theory suggests that dinosaurs were simply too big and cumbersome to live on land.

Telegraph said:

Professor Brian J Ford said the prehistoric creatures “just don’t work” in the way palaeontologists have understood for decades. He believes their tails were too large and cumbersome for them to hunt or move with agility, and said they could not have consumed enough food to sustain their energy needs.

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#2    marharthm

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 10:18 AM

Makes perfect sense. Plenty of dinosaurs have methods of swimming.

Look at the T-Rex for example. Perfect limbs for such a thing.


#3    Arbitran

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 10:25 AM

 Saru, on 03 April 2012 - 08:45 AM, said:

A startling new theory suggests that dinosaurs were simply too big and cumbersome to live on land.

The most absurd theory of paleontology I've heard in recent years. What will they dream up next? That sauropods walked with their legs sprawled like a lizard? Oh, yes... They debunked that a century ago as well.

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#4    voiceofreason

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:24 AM

So they built nests under water and their eggs didn't float away? Twoddle. Next crackpot theory please.


#5    Taun

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:37 AM

That's a brilliant theory...  That fully explains why there are no fossilized dinosaur foot prints!!!!....

oh wait....


#6    gentai

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:13 PM

this goes hand in hand with aquatic ape theory. the only evidence off the top of my head is the fossilized ancient chinese forest that they found under a coal mine. the picture they drew was of a partially submerged environment. i read it on UM


#7    gentai

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:25 PM

the idea being they are not swimming most of the time. things get debunked and then somtimes get undebunked in science. like flat earth. some water type creatures today go to land to lay their eggs. i thought that dino footprints were rare compared to the amount of dinos there were.


#8    highdesert50

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:36 PM

Why not ... certainly there are distinct parallels with, for example the hippo, where the aquatic setting is dominant. Given the diversity in lifeforms that currently exist, certainly there would have been a great deal of diversity in these earlier ages.


#9    Taun

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 12:40 PM

 highdesert50, on 03 April 2012 - 12:36 PM, said:

Why not ... certainly there are distinct parallels with, for example the hippo, where the aquatic setting is dominant. Given the diversity in lifeforms that currently exist, certainly there would have been a great deal of diversity in these earlier ages.


For sauropods (the huge four legged ones) sure... a marshy, watery environment makes sense... But for the large therapods (two legged like the T-Rex, hadrosaurs, etc) a marshy, swamp would be a hinderance for two legs, especially considering their weight... (IMO)...

Edited by Taun, 03 April 2012 - 12:40 PM.


#10    TheSpoonyOne

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 03:48 PM

'Professor Brian J Ford said the prehistoric creatures “just don’t work” in the way palaeontologists have understood for decades.'

It looks like Professor Brian J Ford is looking for his 5 minutes of fame...


#11    Heroic Bishop

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 03:52 PM

What he says does present a fascinating theory, and it is indeed interesting. I for one would like to see further evidence than just his supposition, because the evidence to the contrary makes his theory all but extinct at the moment!


#12    Mizo

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 04:16 PM

So everywhere large Dinosaurs inhabited must have been partially submerged? That seems unlikely.


#13    spud the mackem

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 04:19 PM

This is to me a total "wind up" by B.J.Ford who is a Professor and therefor must have researched the subject including past history of what his eminent colleagues have written and said.He is either trying to gain recognition in the subject or he has been at the back of the bicycle sheds having a bit of Wacky Baccy,Which ever .The subject from my p.o.v. is not worth the time debating as its all been said before by people who have spent their lives researching the period....and who must be regarded as specialists in this field...

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#14    BrandOfAmber

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 04:34 PM

 gentai, on 03 April 2012 - 12:25 PM, said:

the idea being they are not swimming most of the time. things get debunked and then somtimes get undebunked in science. like flat earth. some water type creatures today go to land to lay their eggs. i thought that dino footprints were rare compared to the amount of dinos there were.

I am very confused by this comment...

When exactly did the Flat Earth Theory become 'un-debunked'?


#15    BrandOfAmber

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 04:36 PM

 Vigilanis, on 03 April 2012 - 03:52 PM, said:

What he says does present a fascinating theory, and it is indeed interesting. I for one would like to see further evidence than just his supposition, because the evidence to the contrary makes his theory all but extinct at the moment!

Indeed, well said.  A theory at best, strictly confined to evolutionary locale.  He's saying that they developed partially submerged, and that might be true.  

However with such creatures as T-Rex roaming the landscape (with a full set of land moving apparatus and zero water movement capability) the theory leaves much to be desired...

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