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Profiles of Egypt's main presidential


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#1    Parsip

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 11:47 PM

http://news.yahoo.co...-180042151.html

THE ISLAMISTS:

KHAIRAT EL-SHATER

Deputy head of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's strongest political movement, and thus a top contender. A behind-the-scenes operator, el-Shater, 61, is the top Brotherhood strategist and a chief financier.

Educated as an engineer, el-Shater is a multimillionaire, owning or running a network of businesses, including investment companies, manufacturers and a furniture chain.

El-Shater spent 12 of the past 20 years in prison under then-President Hosni Mubarak's crackdowns on the Brotherhood. He was released from his latest stint after last year's anti-Mubarak uprising and was pardoned by the ruling military.

The Brotherhood calls for an "Islamic basis" for Egypt's government. El-Shater touts his "Renaissance Project" aimed at modernizing long corrupt and incompetent institutions including education, agriculture, transportation and health care.

ABDEL-MONEIM ABOLFOTOH

Formerly the top reformist within the Muslim Brotherhood, which led to clashes with its conservative leadership. The 60-year-old Abolfotoh was ousted from the group last year when he announced his presidential bid, defying the Brotherhood's decision at the time not to field a candidate — a promise it later broke anyway by fielding el-Shater.

Abolfotoh has stood out from the Brotherhood by promoting a more inclusive and open vision. As a result, he is popular among pro-reform Brotherhood youth. In his campaign, he seeks to appeal to moderate Muslims and Egyptians wary of both Mubarak-era officials and hard-line Islamists. A religious conservative, he emphasizes democratic reform over an Islamist agenda.

HAZEM ABU ISMAIL

A lawyer turned television preacher who emerged as a favorite of ultraconservative Islamists known as Salafis. Abu Ismail, 50, has mirrored their calls for implementing a strict version of Islamic law, similar to Saudi Arabia's, with segregation of the sexes and enforcement of public morality. He has also gained support through his denunciations of military rule.

Salafi support makes Abu Ismail a strong rival of el-Shater. But he is very likely to be disqualified by the election commission after it confirmed his mother received American citizenship briefly before her death. Election rules bar any candidate whose spouse or parents hold foreign nationality.

FORMER REGIME FIGURES:

OMAR SULEIMAN

One of the most powerful figures in Mubarak's inner circle, serving as his intelligence chief since 1993.

Beyond intelligence duties, Suleiman was entrusted with running Egypt's most important relationships — with the U.S., Israel and the Palestinians. His intelligence agencies were key to maintaining domestic security, and he is believed to have played a direct role in the United States' "rendition" program, in which terror suspects were sent to allies like Egypt for interrogation — often under torture.

A secretive figure, Suleiman was rarely seen in public. He took an unusually public profile when Mubarak named him vice president during last year's 18-day uprising. It was Suleiman who announced Mubarak's resignation on state TV on Feb. 11.

In his presidential bid, the 75-year-old Suleiman says his priorities are to re-establish security and rebuild the economy. He is believed to be running with the support of the ruling military.

AMR MOUSSA

One of the more popular politicians of Mubarak's regime, serving as foreign minister for decade before becoming Arab League secretary-general in 2001. One reason for his popularity was his vocal criticism of Israel. One singer even put out a tune called, "I Love Amr Moussa and I Hate Israel," which became a big hit. Some believe the song prompted Mubarak, worried over a possible rival, to move Moussa to the Arab League.

Moussa, 76, is of secular background and backs good ties with the West. He is positioning himself as an elder statesman. For revolution supporters, he bears the taint of his regime ties, but in the eyes of others his past frictions with Mubarak give him a distance from his former boss.

AHMED SHAFIQ

A former Air Force commander and civil aviation minister who briefly served as prime minister in the last days of Mubarak. Shafiq, 70, was replaced less than month after Mubarak's Feb. 11 fall, amid protests over a regime figure holding the prime minister post.

THE REVOLUTIONARY:

KHALED ALI

A 40-year-old human rights lawyer and anti-corruption advocate who has spoken out against the handling of Egypt's transition by the military rulers and has taken part in strikes for workers' rights.

He is the closest candidate in ideology to the young, liberal and leftist activists who launched the anti-Mubarak uprising. But he is hardly known by the general public and several activists have said they will not back him since he is not a real contender.

----------------------------------------

A Muslim Bro, a Salafist, and the former dictator's right hand man. See, this is what happens when you get rid of an unelected tyrant and give Middle Easterners the right to vote: they vote in a new tyrant. :blink:


#2    and then

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 12:55 AM

I assume that since the MB made such a powerful showing in parliament that el Shater will win.  None appear particularly friendly either to Israel or the West in general.  Obama is still funding the military so I cannot imagine even the MB trying to remove them from power totally.

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#3    Knight Of Shadows

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:41 AM

it's democracy .. if people wants brotherhood .. or your worst fear " muslims " they will get them
it's elections am sure you heard how it works before
they elect in little box who they want and who gets the votes wins .. so whatever the people choose they get
.. disregarding your opinion for sure

"why should we not rely on Allah when he guided us our path . we shall certainly bear with patience all the hurt you may cause us. for those who want to put their trust in someone should put their trust in Allah.


#4    and then

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 05:16 AM

View PostKnight Of Shadows, on 12 April 2012 - 04:41 AM, said:

it's democracy .. if people wants brotherhood .. or your worst fear " muslims " they will get them
it's elections am sure you heard how it works before
they elect in little box who they want and who gets the votes wins .. so whatever the people choose they get
.. disregarding your opinion for sure
If they want to hand themselves over to tormenters I say go for it!  Frankly I could care less what they do in their own country.  I feel badly for those with education enough to know how life could be and who are forced by circumstances to remain in such a place.  KoS I don't fear Muslims.  I despise those who arrogantly tell me that I'm wrong and need to live life by their direction.  That's the difference between us KoS.  I think if you could have your own will be done, you would force all people to worship your god.  I'm perfectly willing to worship the God of the Bible and leave everyone else to worship anything they choose.
Your attempt at sarcasm about elections is pretty funny.  Islam and democracy do not and never will coexist.  If given the right to cast a vote, the sheep just bleat the same sound as the mullahs and then, poof! No more elections.  Just look at the Hamas.  Perfect example.  Just a bunch of backward idiots.  They possess land and resources that could make Gaza  a wealthy place for tourism.  Yet they prefer being beggars with their hands out to the whole world to feed them and secure land for them that they can never take on their own.  Generation after generation...living as beggars....pathetic.
Oh and BTW KoS, that whole, "living as beggars" thing isn't unique to Arabs.  Many here in the US are just the same and for the same reasons, generational, irrational hatred.

edited to make a further point!

Edited by and then, 12 April 2012 - 05:21 AM.

  We've cast the world, we've set the stage,
  for what could be, the darkest age...
“This is like playing poker with a guy who cheated you twice before. You know who does that, a moron.

#5    Knight Of Shadows

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 06:02 AM

did you just call us beggars ?  :lol:
i wasn't really talking to you but hey it'll be nice chatting with you too
as axel almighty always says umm that will be me of course

you chant about democracy .. and when people choose representer you don't like .. you call them foolish ?
they pick their goverment to represent them .. them and not you or your desires
let me enlighten your dark brain .. although light isn't really a shadow's job but just so you reliaze
how important you are to me brother :D

you see each sect shows their work agenda .. and future plans and laws and their way of working as goverment
people see this goverment didn't stick to their plan they're gonna go out on another revolution and throw it away
just like the past one but what you need to reliaze that you're dealing with the people will not
not one person country

and who said i want all people to worship my god .. i don't worship him often last time i prayed was ... damn i don't remember
no religion goes well with democracy .. not even your bible religion and that's a fact
but hey people of egypt decide what they want .. without reviewing their thoughts with you  :lol:
or anyone else .. it's their country they live it the way they deem fit their lives
that doesn't make them stupid maybe you look stupid to them for your way of life just like they look stupid or foolish to you
so it's round table really just depends on which way you look at it
be nice chatting with ya  :P

"why should we not rely on Allah when he guided us our path . we shall certainly bear with patience all the hurt you may cause us. for those who want to put their trust in someone should put their trust in Allah.


#6    Parsip

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:13 PM

The only way for democracy to work in the Middle East is if the general population and the police and military forces support a constitution that guarantees every individual's right, so that even 80% of the population or government is unable to deny any rights to any person. This is impossible in the Middle East, as each ethnic, religious, political or even linguistic group couldn't care less about the rights of any other group.


#7    meryt-tetisheri

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:17 AM

View PostKnight Of Shadows, on 12 April 2012 - 04:41 AM, said:

it's democracy .. if people wants brotherhood .. or your worst fear " muslims " they will get them it's elections am sure you heard how it works before they elect in little box who they want and who gets the votes wins .. so whatever the people choose they get.. disregarding your opinion for sure



Knight, unfortunately what is going on in Egypt now has little to do with democracy. It is rather a dangerous political ‘circus’ and a tug of war between powers which have little genuine interest in the welfare of Egyptian citizens, except to exploit their misery. It has become so depressive & nauseating that I am reluctant to participate in the thread except with this comment!


#8    Knight Of Shadows

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:45 PM

View Postmeryt-tetisheri, on 15 April 2012 - 04:17 AM, said:

Knight, unfortunately what is going on in Egypt now has little to do with democracy. It is rather a dangerous political ‘circus’ and a tug of war between powers which have little genuine interest in the welfare of Egyptian citizens, except to exploit their misery. It has become so depressive & nauseating that I am reluctant to participate in the thread except with this comment!
i know man and i noticed how the brotherhood stopped joining protests anymore coz it didn't suit their political view
and that really set them off on my list and the remainants of the old regiem still hanging on to their power there
therefore that revo is still incomplete there in my opinion egypt revo is still in proceess
i hope it gets better for you people there

"why should we not rely on Allah when he guided us our path . we shall certainly bear with patience all the hurt you may cause us. for those who want to put their trust in someone should put their trust in Allah.


#9    Knight Of Shadows

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:48 PM

View PostParsip, on 12 April 2012 - 04:13 PM, said:

The only way for democracy to work in the Middle East is if the general population and the police and military forces support a constitution that guarantees every individual's right, so that even 80% of the population or government is unable to deny any rights to any person. This is impossible in the Middle East, as each ethnic, religious, political or even linguistic group couldn't care less about the rights of any other group.
it's no longer democracy if it's forced .. and then the military forces will become the dictators
it's painfull circle however you looked it .. but in middle east there's so much violence and racisim against each other
different religious .. that started to show off lately due to the recent major changes
and that will need years and years to wash away not any time soon

"why should we not rely on Allah when he guided us our path . we shall certainly bear with patience all the hurt you may cause us. for those who want to put their trust in someone should put their trust in Allah.


#10    and then

and then

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 08:11 PM

I noticed today that Egypt disqualified Suleiman and Shater (for different reasons) so neither can run.  Suleiman I understood but I was suprised that they told an MB guy he couldn't run because he hadn't been out of jail long enough. I thought it was an encouraging sign for the people.

  We've cast the world, we've set the stage,
  for what could be, the darkest age...
“This is like playing poker with a guy who cheated you twice before. You know who does that, a moron.

#11    meryt-tetisheri

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:35 PM

View Postand then, on 16 April 2012 - 08:11 PM, said:

I noticed today that Egypt disqualified Suleiman and Shater (for different reasons) so neither can run.  Suleiman I understood but I was suprised that they told an MB guy he couldn't run because he hadn't been out of jail long enough. I thought it was an encouraging sign for the people.


Mubarak's regime was criticized for fostering the collusion between politics & business, which opened the door for corruption. Now the 'revolutionary' MB is going one step further by nominating a businessman for the presidency, this is anything but encouraging.  In their grab for power, the MB is following in the steps of Mubarak's NDP. In both cases, it's the poor who lose!




#12    meryt-tetisheri

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 12:16 AM

View PostKnight Of Shadows, on 16 April 2012 - 07:45 PM, said:

i know man and i noticed how the brotherhood stopped joining protests anymore coz it didn't suit their political view
and that really set them off on my list and the remainants of the old regiem still hanging on to their power there
therefore that revo is still incomplete there in my opinion egypt revo is still in proceess
i hope it gets better for you people there


Aborted or still in process? I'm not so sure any more. Browse FB, particularly the pages "Al Ikhwan Kazeboun", "6 April", "the Guy Behind Omar Sulieman" & others to get an idea of the failures of the MB.One page gives a summary evaluation of presidential candidates as a funny parody of an Arabic grammar lesson is here : https://www.facebook...23710742&type=1


#13    Parsip

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 02:13 AM

:rofl: That is pretty funny.





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